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  • 1.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Morelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    The cortisol response in parents staying with a sick child at hospital2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 620-625Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To study the cortisol response in parents staying with their child in paediatric wards, to compare the parents’ cortisol levels between the paediatric ward and at home 4 weeks after discharge and to compare the parents’ cortisol levels with data of an adult reference population, reported by Wust et al., as there are few studies investigating parental cortisol.

    Design

    This study has a descriptive and prospective comparative design.

    Method

    Thirty‐one parents participated. Saliva samples were collected in the paediatric ward and 4 weeks later at home.

    Results

    The parents had lower morning awakening cortisol levels in the paediatric ward than at home after discharge. There were no statistically significant differences in postawakening cortisol or cortisol awakening response (CAR). The child's age, diagnosis or previously diagnosed chronic condition did not affect the parents’ cortisol levels. The morning and postawakening cortisol levels were lower than those of the reference population.

    Conclusion

    The hospital stay with a sick child affects parents’ cortisol levels. Parental stress needs more attention to find interventions to prevent the risk of stress‐related complications that subsequently can affect the care of the child.

  • 2.
    Bergdahl, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Faculty of Nursing and Health Sciences, Nord University, Bodø, Norway.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Department of Health Care Science/ Palliative Research Centre, Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Department of Health Care Science/ Palliative Research Centre, Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Stockholm, Sweden; Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Gjøvik, Norway .
    The theory of a co-creative process in advanced palliative home care nursing encounters: A qualitative deductive approach over time2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 175-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    The aim of this study was to test the theoretical conceptualization of the co‐creative process in home care nursing encounters over time.

    Method and design

    This was a multiple case study with a deductive analysis of qualitative data over time, using interviews and observations collected from three cases.

    Results

    The co‐creative process was complex and contained main, sub‐ and micro‐processes. Time was important and valuable, giving the patient and relatives space to adjust the process to their own pace. Some processes were worked on more intensively in accordance with the patients’ and relatives’ needs, and these are considered the main‐process. The further developed theory of the co‐creative process and its main, sub‐ and microprocesses can be understood as a concretization of how good nursing care can be performed within caring relationships in the context of advanced palliative home care.

  • 3.
    Hadziabdic, Emina
    et al.
    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences Department of Health and Caring Sciences Linnaeus University Växjö Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences Uppsala University Uppsala Sweden.
    Establishing a culturally specific nursing home for Finnish-speaking older persons in Sweden: A case study2018In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 210-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aims to describe the establishment of a culturally specific nursing home for Finnish-speaking older persons in Sweden.

  • 4.
    Pereira Caldas, Célia
    et al.
    Nursing Faculty, Rio de Janeiro State University, Brazil.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Taking the responsibility in dementia care: A concept analysis about facticity2018In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 310-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The aim of this study is to develop a comprehensive definition of facticity, applicable to dementia nursing.

    Methods

    Walker and Avant's Concept Analysis was used to analyse facticity. Published literature found in PubMed, CINAHL, PsycInfo, and Scopus using the search term facticity and nursing, as well as books and dictionaries and empirical data was used to clarify the concept.

    Results

    Facticity in nursing dementia care is being in reality taking on responsibility to truth. Antecedents of facticity include persons occupied with caring a demented older person including full‐time duties, often accompanied by resistive behaviours. They are overloaded both physically and psychologically. Being present and feeling compassion and nurturing the relationship with the demented older persons and in that way strengthen the caregiving process.

    Conclusion

    Nurses need to be aware that all human beings are living with facticity.

  • 5.
    Petersson, Christina
    et al.
    Department of Nursing at School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University and Member of IMPROVE Research Group at the Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare Jönköping University Sweden.
    Björkander, Jan Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Academy for Health and Care Futurum Jönköping Sweden.
    Fust, Ramona
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Discovering aspects of health-experiences of a web-based health diary among adults with primary immunodeficiency2018In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 642-648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advances in technology generate new opportunities to develop e-health tools to help individuals in self-management by assessing symptoms of illness and its relation to treatments. Self-management is central when living with primary immunodeficiency diseases. The aim was to explore the experiences of people living with primary immunodeficiency, who used a pilot version of the web-based health diary.

  • 6.
    Skagerström, Janna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regional Board, Research and Development Unit.
    Ericsson, Carin
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schildmeijer, Kristina
    Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden, .
    Patient involvement for improved patient safety: A qualitative study of nurses’ perceptions and experiences2017In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 230-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To explore nurses’ perceptions and experiences of patient involvement relevant to patient safety.

    Design

    Qualitative design using individual semi-structured interviews.

    Methods

    Interviews with registered nurses (= 11) and nurse assistants (= 8) were conducted in 2015–2016. Nurses were recruited from five different healthcare units in Sweden. The material was analysed using conventional content analysis.

    Results

    The analysis resulted in four categories: healthcare professionals’ ways of influencing patient involvement for safer care; patients’ ways of influencing patient involvement for safer care; barriers to patient involvement for safer care; and relevance of patient involvement for safer care. The nurses expressed that patient involvement is a shared responsibility. They also emphasized that healthcare provider has a responsibility to create opportunities for the patient to participate. According to the nurses, involvement can be hindered by factors related to the patient, the healthcare provider and the healthcare system. However, respondents expressed that patient involvement can lead to safer care and benefits for individual patients.

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