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  • 1.
    Brus, Ole
    et al.
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Orebro Univ, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hammar, Asa
    Univ Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hosp, Norway.
    Landen, Mikael
    Gothenburg Univ, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden.
    Nordanskog, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Psykiatriska kliniken inkl beroendekliniken.
    Nordenskjold, Axel
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Lithium for suicide and readmission prevention after electroconvulsive therapy for unipolar depression: population-based register study2019In: BJPsych Open, E-ISSN 2056-4724, Vol. 5, no 3, article id e46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is effective for unipolar depression but relapse and suicide are significant challenges. Lithium could potentially lower these risks, but is used only in a minority of patients. Aims This study quantifies the effect of lithium on risk of suicide and readmission and identifies factors that are associate with readmission and suicide. Method This population-based register study used data from the Swedish National Quality Register for ECT and other Swedish national registers. Patients who have received ECT for unipolar depression as in-patients between 2011 and 2016 were followed until death, readmission to hospital or the termination of the study at the end of 2016. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) of readmission and suicide in adjusted models. Results Out of 7350 patients, 56 died by suicide and 4203 were readmitted. Lithium was prescribed to 638 (9%) patients. Mean follow-up was 1.4 years. Lithium was significantly associated with lower risk of suicide (P = 0.014) and readmission (HR 0.84 95% CI 0.75-0.93). The number needed to be treated with lithium to prevent one readmission was 16. In addition, the following factors were statistically associated with suicide: male gender, being a widow, substance use disorder and a history of suicide attempts. Readmission was associated with young age, being divorced or unemployed, comorbid anxiety disorder, nonpsychotic depression, more severe symptoms before ECT, no improvement with ECT, not receiving continuation ECT or antidepressants, usage of antipsychotics, anxiolytics or benzodiazepines, severity of medication resistance and number of previous admissions. Conclusions More patients could benefit from lithium treatment.

  • 2.
    Gustafsson, Berit M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Granlund, Mats
    CHILD research environment, SIDR, Jönköping University, Sweden and Department of Special Education, Oslo University, Norway.
    Gustafsson, Per A
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Proczkowska, Marie
    Psychiatric Clinic, Hospital of Jönköping, Division of Psychiatrics and Rehabilitation/Jönköping County, Sweden..
    Hyperactivity precedes conduct problems in preschool children: a longitudinal study.2018In: BJPsych Open, E-ISSN 2056-4724, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 186-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Externalising problems are among the most common symptoms of mental health problems in preschool children.

    Aims: To investigate the development of externalising problems in preschool children over time, and the way in which conduct problems are linked to hyperactivity problems.

    Method: In this longitudinal study, 195 preschool children were included. Latent growth modelling of conduct problems was carried out, with gender and hyperactivity at year 1 as time-invariant predictors.

    Results: Hyperactivity was a significant predictor for the intercept and slope of conduct problems. Children with more hyperactivity at year 1 had more conduct problems and a slower reduction in conduct problems. Gender was a significant predictor for the slope of conduct problems.

    Conclusions: Children with more initial hyperactivity have less of a reduction in conduct problems over time. It is important to consider the role of hyperactivity in studies of the development of conduct problems.

    Declaration of interest: None.

  • 3.
    Josefsson, Ann
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Vikström, Josefin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Psykiatriska kliniken inkl beroendekliniken.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Major depressive disorder in women and risk for future generations: population-based three-generation study2019In: BJPsych Open, E-ISSN 2056-4724, Vol. 5, no 1, article id e8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The well-known adverse consequences of maternal depression prompts consideration of the importance of learning more about intergenerational transmission in order to identify individuals at risk of developing depressive disorders. Aims To follow two generations of women with major depressive disorder (MDD) and to examine the risk of MDD in the third-generation children. Method A register-based, retrospective cohort study of all women born in Sweden between 1973 and 1982 who had given birth during the study period, their mothers and their children. All generations were followed until 2013. Data was stratified into two cohorts: women born between 1973 and 1977 and those born between 1978 and 1982. Results Second-generation women were twice as likely to be diagnosed with MDD if their mothers had been diagnosed with MDD. If both previous generations had been diagnosed with depression the likelihood of the third-generation child being diagnosed with MDD was markedly increased (odds ratio (OR) = 5.07, 95% CI 4.06-6.34 and OR = 7.20, 95% CI 4.41-11.77 in cohort 1 and cohort 2, respectively). Conclusions There is a strong intergenerational impact in the transmission of MDD. The risk of MDD is especially high in individuals with MDD in both previous maternal generations.

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