liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 44 of 44
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Adori, Csaba
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Daraio, Teresa
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kuiper, Raoul
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Barde, Swapnali
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Horvathova, Lubica
    Slovak Acad Sci, Slovakia.
    Yoshitake, Takashi
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ihnatko, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Georg August Univ Gottingen, Germany.
    Valladolid-Acebes, Ismael
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Vercruysse, Pauline
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Wellendorf, Ashley M.
    Cincinnati Childrens Hosp Med Ctr, OH 45229 USA.
    Gramignoli, Roberto
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bozoky, Bela
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Kehr, Jan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Cancelas, Jose A.
    Cincinnati Childrens Hosp Med Ctr, OH 45229 USA; Univ Cincinnati, OH 45267 USA.
    Mravec, Boris
    Slovak Acad Sci, Slovakia; Comenius Univ, Slovakia.
    Jorns, Carl
    Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Sweden.
    Ellis, Ewa
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Mulder, Jan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Uhlen, Mathias
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Bark, Christina
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hökfelt, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Disorganization and degeneration of liver sympathetic innervations in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease revealed by 3D imaging2021In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 7, no 30, article id eabg5733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hepatic nerves have a complex role in synchronizing liver metabolism. Here, we used three-dimensional (3D) immunoimaging to explore the integrity of the hepatic nervous system in experimental and human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We demonstrate parallel signs of mild degeneration and axonal sprouting of sympathetic innervations in early stages of experimental NAFLD and a collapse of sympathetic arborization in steatohepatitis. Human fatty livers display a similar pattern of sympathetic nerve degeneration, correlating with the severity of NAFLD pathology. We show that chronic sympathetic hyperexcitation is a key factor in the axonal degeneration, here genetically phenocopied in mice deficient of the Rac-1 activator Vav3. In experimental steatohepatitis, 3D imaging reveals a severe portal vein contraction, spatially correlated with the extension of the remaining nerves around the portal vein, enlightening a potential intrahepatic neuronal mechanism of portal hypertension. These fundamental alterations in liver innervation and vasculature uncover previously unidentified neuronal components in NAFLD pathomechanisms.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Anderson, Christopher P.
    et al.
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA; Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Glen, Elena O.
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Zeledon, Cyrus
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Bourassa, Alexandre
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Jin, Yu
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Zhu, Yizhi
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Vorwerk, Christian
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Crook, Alexander L.
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA; Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Abe, Hiroshi
    Natl Inst Quantum Sci & Technol, Japan.
    Ul-Hassan, Jawad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ohshima, Takeshi
    Natl Inst Quantum Sci & Technol, Japan.
    Nguyen, Son Tien
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Galli, Giulia
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA; Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA; Argonne Natl Lab, IL 60439 USA.
    Awschalom, David D.
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA; Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA; Argonne Natl Lab, IL 60439 USA.
    Five-second coherence of a single spin with single-shot readout in silicon carbide2022In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 8, no 5, article id eabm5912Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An outstanding hurdle for defect spin qubits in silicon carbide (SiC) is single-shot readout, a deterministic measurement of the quantum state. Here, we demonstrate single-shot readout of single defects in SiC via spin-to-charge conversion, whereby the defects spin state is mapped onto a long-lived charge state. With this technique, we achieve over 80% readout fidelity without pre- or postselection, resulting in a high signal-to-noise ratio that enables us to measure long spin coherence times. Combined with pulsed dynamical decoupling sequences in an isotopically purified host material, we report single-spin T-2 > 5 seconds, over two orders of magnitude greater than previously reported in this system. The mapping of these coherent spin states onto single charges unlocks both single-shot readout for scalable quantum nodes and opportunities for electrical readout via integration with semiconductor devices.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Armada Moreira, Adam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Int Sch Adv Studies, Italy.
    Manan Dar, Abdul Manan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhao, Zifang
    Columbia Univ, NY 10027 USA.
    Cea, Claudia
    Columbia Univ, NY 10027 USA.
    Gelinas, Jennifer
    Columbia Univ, NY 10032 USA.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Costa, Alex
    Univ Milan, Italy; Natl Res Council Italy CNR, Italy.
    Khodagholy, Dion
    Columbia Univ, NY 10027 USA.
    Stavrinidou, Eleni
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Plant electrophysiology with conformable organic electronics: Deciphering the propagation of Venus flytrap action potentials2023In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 9, no 30, article id eadh4443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrical signals in plants are mediators of long-distance signaling and correlate with plant movements and responses to stress. These signals are studied with single surface electrodes that cannot resolve signal propagation and integration, thus impeding their decoding and link to function. Here, we developed a conformable multielectrode array based on organic electronics for large-scale and high-resolution plant electrophysiology. We performed precise spatiotemporal mapping of the action potential (AP) in Venus flytrap and found that the AP actively propagates through the tissue with constant speed and without strong directionality. We also found that spontaneously generated APs can originate from unstimulated hairs and that they correlate with trap movement. Last, we demonstrate that the Venus flytrap circuitry can be activated by cells other than the sensory hairs. Our work reveals key properties of the AP and establishes the capacity of organic bioelectronics for resolving electrical signaling in plants contributing to the mechanistic understanding of long-distance responses in plants.

  • 4.
    Arvidsson, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Collet, F.
    Ramon Llull Univ, Spain.
    Hedström, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Trojan-horse mechanism: How networks reduce gender segregation2021In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 7, no 16, article id eabf6730Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The segregation of labor markets along ethnic and gender lines is socially highly consequential, and the social science literature has long viewed homophily and network-based job recruitments as some of its most crucial drivers. Here, we focus on a previously unidentified mechanism, the Trojan-horse mechanism, which, in contradiction to the main tenet of previous research, suggests that network-based recruitment reduce rather than increase segregation levels. We identify the conditions under which networks are desegregating, and using unique data on all individuals and all workplaces located in the Stockholm region during the years 2000-2017, we find strong empirical evidence for the Trojan-horse mechanism and its role in the gender segregation of labor markets.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Bernardo, Carmela
    et al.
    Univ Sannio, Italy.
    Wang, Lingfei
    Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Vasca, Francesco
    Univ Sannio, Italy.
    Hong, Yiguang
    Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Shi, Guodong
    Univ Sydney, Australia.
    Altafini, Claudio
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Achieving consensus in multilateral international negotiations: The case study of the 2015 Paris Agreement on climate change2021In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 7, no 51, article id eabg8068Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to propose a dynamical model describing the achievement of the 2015 Paris Agreement on climate change. To represent the complex, decade-long, multiparty negotiation process that led to the accord, we use a two time scale dynamical model. The short time scale corresponds to the discussion process occurring at each meeting and is represented as a Friedkin-Johnsen model, a dynamical multiparty model in which the parties show stubbornness, i.e., tend to defend their positions during the discussion. The long time scale behavior is determined by concatenating multiple Friedkin-Johnsen models (one for each meeting). The proposed model, tuned on real data extracted from the Paris Agreement meetings, achieves consensus on a time horizon similar to that of the real negotiations. Remarkably, the model is also able to identify a series of parties that exerted a key leadership role in the Paris Agreement negotiation process.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Bertassoli, Dailson J. Jr.
    et al.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil; Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Sawakuchi, Henrique
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    de Araujo, Kleiton R.
    Fed Univ Para, Brazil.
    de Camargo, Marcelo G. P.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Alem, Victor A. T.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Pereira, Tatiana S.
    Fed Univ Para, Brazil.
    Krusche, Alex V
    Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Bastviken, David
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Richey, Jeffrey E.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil; Univ Washington, WA 98195 USA.
    Sawakuchi, Andre O.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    How green can Amazon hydropower be?: Net carbon emission from the largest hydropower plant in Amazonia2021In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 7, no 26, article id eabe1470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current resurgence of hydropower expansion toward tropical areas has been largely based on run-of-the-river (ROR) dams, which are claimed to have lower environmental impacts due to their smaller reservoirs. The Belo Monte dam was built in Eastern Amazonia and holds the largest installed capacity among ROR power plants worldwide. Here, we show that postdamming greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the Belo Monte area are up to three times higher than preimpoundment fluxes and equivalent to about 15 to 55 kg CO(2)eq MWh(-1). Since per-area emissions in Amazonian reservoirs are significantly higher than global averages, reducing flooded areas and prioritizing the power density of hydropower plants seem to effectively reduce their carbon footprints. Nevertheless, total GHG emissions are substantial even from this leading-edge ROR power plant. This argues in favor of avoiding hydropower expansion in Amazonia regardless of the reservoir type.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Burwood, George
    et al.
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, OR 97239 USA.
    Hakizimana, Pierre
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nuttall, Alfred L.
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, OR 97239 USA.
    Fridberger, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, OR 97239 USA.
    Best frequencies and temporal delays are similar across the low-frequency regions of the guinea pig cochlea2022In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 8, no 38, article id eabq2773Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cochlea maps tones with different frequencies to distinct anatomical locations. For instance, a faint 5000-hertz tone produces brisk responses at a place approximately 8 millimeters into the 18-millimeter-long guinea pig cochlea, but little response elsewhere. This place code pervades the auditory pathways, where neurons have "best frequencies" determined by their connections to the sensory cells in the hearing organ. However, frequency selectivity in cochlear regions encoding low-frequency sounds has not been systematically studied. Here, we show that low-frequency hearing works according to a unique principle that does not involve a place code. Instead, sound-evoked responses and temporal delays are similar across the low-frequency regions of the cochlea. These findings are a break from theories considered proven for 100 years and have broad implications for understanding information processing in the brainstem and cortex and for optimizing the stimulus delivery in auditory implants.

  • 8.
    Dahlqvist, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Meshkian, Rahele
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tao, Quanzheng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Prediction and synthesis of a family of atomic laminate phases with Kagome-like and in-plane chemical ordering2017In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 3, no 7, article id e1700642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The enigma of MAX phases and their hybrids prevails. We probe transition metal (M) alloying in MAX phases for metal size, electronegativity, and electron configuration, and discover ordering in these MAX hybrids, namely, (V2/3Zr1/3)(2)AlC and (Mo2/3Y1/3)(2)AlC. Predictive theory and verifying materials synthesis, including a judicious choice of alloying M from groups III to VI and periods 4 and 5, indicate a potentially large family of thermodynamically stable phases, with Kagome-like and in-plane chemical ordering, and with incorporation of elements previously not known for MAX phases, including the common Y. We propose the structure to be monoclinic C2/c. As an extension of the work, we suggest a matching set of novel MXenes, from selective etching of the A-element. The demonstrated structural design on simultaneous two-dimensional (2D) and 3D atomic levels expands the property tuning potential of functional materials.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Demchyshyn, Stepan
    et al.
    Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria; Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria; LIT, Austria.
    Melanie Roemer, Janina
    Ludwig Maximilians University of Munchen, Germany; Ludwig Maximilians University of Munchen, Germany.
    Groiss, Heiko
    Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria; Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria.
    Heilbrunner, Herwig
    Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria.
    Ulbricht, Christoph
    Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria; Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria.
    Apaydin, Dogukan
    Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria.
    Boehm, Anton
    Ludwig Maximilians University of Munchen, Germany; Ludwig Maximilians University of Munchen, Germany.
    Ruett, Uta
    DESY, Germany.
    Bertram, Florian
    DESY, Germany.
    Hesser, Guenter
    Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria.
    Clark Scharber, Markus
    Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria.
    Serdar Sariciftci, Niyazi
    Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria.
    Nickel, Bert
    Ludwig Maximilians University of Munchen, Germany; Ludwig Maximilians University of Munchen, Germany; Nanosyst Initiat Munich, Germany.
    Bauer, Siegfried
    Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria.
    Glowacki, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kaltenbrunner, Martin
    Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria; LIT, Austria.
    Confining metal-halide perovskites in nanoporous thin films2017In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 3, no 8, article id e1700738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Controlling the size and shape of semiconducting nanocrystals advances nanoelectronics and photonics. Quantumconfined, inexpensive, solution-derived metal halide perovskites offer narrowband, color-pure emitters as integral parts of next-generation displays and optoelectronic devices. We use nanoporous silicon and alumina thin films as templates for the growth of perovskite nanocrystallites directly within device-relevant architectures without the use of colloidal stabilization. We find significantly blue-shifted photoluminescence emission by reducing the pore size; normally infrared-emitting materials become visibly red, and green-emitting materials become cyan and blue. Confining perovskite nanocrystals within porous oxide thin films drastically increases photoluminescence stability because the templates auspiciously serve as encapsulation. We quantify the template-induced size of the perovskite crystals in nanoporous silicon with microfocus high-energy x-ray depth profiling in transmission geometry, verifying the growth of perovskite nanocrystals throughout the entire thickness of the nanoporous films. Low-voltage electroluminescent diodes with narrow, blue-shifted emission fabricated from nanocrystalline perovskites grown in embedded nanoporous alumina thin films substantiate our general concept for next-generation photonic devices.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Domi, Esi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Xu, Li
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Elect Sci & Technol China, Peoples R China.
    Toivainen, Sanne
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nordeman, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gobbo, Francesco
    Univ Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Venniro, Marco
    Univ Maryland, MD 21201 USA.
    Shaham, Yavin
    Natl Inst Drug Abuse NIDA, MD 21224 USA.
    Messing, Robert O.
    Univ Texas Austin, TX 78712 USA; Univ Texas Austin, TX 78712 USA; Univ Texas Austin, TX 78712 USA.
    Visser, Esther
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    van den Oever, Michel C.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Holm, Lovisa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Barbier, Estelle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Augier, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    A neural substrate of compulsive alcohol use2021In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 7, no 34, article id eabg9045Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alcohol intake remains controlled in a majority of users but becomes "compulsive," i.e., continues despite adverse consequences, in a minority who develop alcohol addiction. Here, using a footshock-punished alcohol self-administration procedure, we screened a large population of outbred rats to identify those showing compulsivity operationalized as punishment-resistant self-administration. Using unsupervised clustering, we found that this behavior emerged as a stable trait in a subpopulation of rats and was associated with activity of a brain network that included central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA). Activity of PKC delta(+) inhibitory neurons in the lateral subdivision of CeA (CeL) accounted for similar to 75% of variance in punishment-resistant alcohol taking. Activity-dependent tagging, followed by chemogenetic inhibition of neurons activated during punishment-resistant self-administration, suppressed alcohol taking, as did a virally mediated shRNA knockdown of PKC delta in CeA. These findings identify a previously unknown mechanism for a core element of alcohol addiction and point to a novel candidate therapeutic target.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11.
    Douvlataniotis, Karolos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    Bensberg, Maike
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    Lentini, Antonio
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    Gylemo, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    Nestor, Colm
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    No evidence for DNA N-6-methyladenine in mammals2020In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 6, no 12, article id eaay3335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    N-6-methyladenine (6mdA) is a widespread DNA modification in bacteria. More recently, 6mdA has also been characterized in mammalian DNA. However, measurements of 6mdA abundance and profiles are often very dissimilar between studies, even when performed on DNA from identical mammalian cell types. Using comprehensive bioinformatics analyses of published data and novel experimental approaches, we reveal that efforts to assay 6mdA in mammals have been severely compromised by bacterial contamination, RNA contamination, technological limitations, and antibody nonspecificity. These complications render 6mdA an exceptionally problematic DNA modification to study and have resulted in erroneous detection of 6mdA in several mammalian systems. Together, our results strongly imply that the evidence published to date is not sufficient to support the presence of 6mdA in mammals.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12.
    Erlandsdotter, Lisa-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Giammarino, Lucilla
    Univ Hosp Bern, Switzerland; Univ Bern, Switzerland.
    Halili, Azemine
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nikesjö, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Green, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Genet & Forens Toxicol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Odening, Katja E.
    Univ Hosp Bern, Switzerland; Univ Bern, Switzerland.
    Liin, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Long-QT mutations in KCNE1 modulate the 1713-estradiol response of Kv7.1/KCNE12023In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 9, no 11, article id eade7109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Estradiol (1713-E2) is implicated in higher arrhythmia risk of women with congenital or acquired long-QT syn-drome (LQTS) compared to men. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood, and little is known about the impact of LQTS-associated mutations. We show that 1713-E2 inhibits the human cardiac Kv7.1/ KCNE1 channel expressed in Xenopus oocytes. We find that the 1713-E2 effect depends on the Kv7.1 to KCNE1 stoichiometry, and we reveal a critical function of the KCNE1 carboxyl terminus for the effect. LQTS-associated mutations in the KCNE1 carboxyl terminus show a range of responses to 1713-E2, from a wild-type like response to impaired or abolished response. Together, this study increases our understanding of the mechanistic basis for 1713-E2 inhibition of Kv7.1/KCNE1 and demonstrates mutation-dependent responses to 1713-E2. These findings suggest that the 1713-E2 effect on Kv7.1/KCNE1 might contribute to the higher arrhythmia risk of women, par-ticularly in carriers with specific LQTS-associated mutations.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13.
    Fabiano, Simone
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Abdollahi Sani, Negar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. RISE Acreo, Sweden.
    Kawahara, Jun
    RISE Acreo, Sweden; LINTEC Corp, Japan.
    Kergoat, Loig
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Aix Marseille University, France.
    Nissa, Josefin
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Engquist, Isak
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ferroelectric polarization induces electronic nonlinearity in ion-doped conducting polymers2017In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 3, no 6, article id e1700345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) is an organic mixed ion-electron conducting polymer. The PEDOT phase transports holes and is redox-active, whereas the PSS phase transports ions. When PEDOT is redox-switched between its semiconducting and conducting state, the electronic and optical properties of its bulk are controlled. Therefore, it is appealing to use this transition in electrochemical devices and to integrate those into large-scale circuits, such as display or memory matrices. Addressability and memory functionality of individual devices, within these matrices, are typically achieved by nonlinear current-voltage characteristics and bistability-functions that can potentially be offered by the semiconductor-conductor transition of redox polymers. However, low conductivity of the semiconducting state and poor bistability, due to self-discharge, make fast operation and memory retention impossible. We report that a ferroelectric polymer layer, coated along the counter electrode, can control the redox state of PEDOT. The polarization switching characteristics of the ferroelectric polymer, which take place as the coercive field is overcome, introduce desired nonlinearity and bistability in devices that maintain PEDOT in its highly conducting and fast-operating regime. Memory functionality and addressability are demonstrated in ferro-electrochromic display pixels and ferro-electrochemical transistors.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    Fredriksson, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. NIDA, MD 21224 USA.
    Tsai, Pei-Jung
    NIDA, MD USA.
    Shekara, Aniruddha
    NIDA, MD 21224 USA.
    Duan, Ying
    NIDA, MD USA.
    Applebey, Sarah V.
    NIDA, MD 21224 USA.
    Minier-Toribio, Angelica
    NIDA, MD 21224 USA.
    Batista, Ashley
    NIDA, MD 21224 USA.
    Chow, Jonathan J.
    NIDA, MD 21224 USA.
    Altidor, Lindsay
    NIDA, MD 21224 USA.
    Barbier, Estelle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cifani, Carlo
    Univ Camerino, Italy.
    Li, Xuan
    Univ Maryland, MD 20742 USA.
    Reiner, David J.
    NIDA, MD 21224 USA.
    Rubio, F. Javier
    NIDA, MD 21224 USA.
    Hope, Bruce T.
    NIDA, MD 21224 USA.
    Yang, Yihong
    NIDA, MD USA.
    Bossert, Jennifer M.
    NIDA, MD 21224 USA.
    Shaham, Yavin
    NIDA, MD 21224 USA.
    Role of ventral subiculum neuronal ensembles in incubation of oxycodone craving after electric barrier-induced voluntary abstinence2023In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 9, no 2, article id eadd8687Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High relapse rate is a key feature of opioid addiction. In humans, abstinence is often voluntary due to negative consequences of opioid seeking. To mimic this human condition, we recently introduced a rat model of incubation of oxycodone craving after electric barrier-induced voluntary abstinence. Incubation of drug craving refers to time-dependent increases in drug seeking after cessation of drug self-administration. Here, we used the activity marker Fos, muscimol-baclofen (GABAa + GABAb receptor agonists) global inactivation, Daun020-selective inactivation of putative relapse-associated neuronal ensembles, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting of Fos-positive cells and quantitative polymerase chain reaction to demonstrate a key role of vSub neuronal ensembles in incubation of oxycodone craving after voluntary abstinence, but not homecage forced abstinence. We also used a longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging method and showed that functional connectivity changes in vSub-related circuits predict opioid relapse after abstinence induced by adverse consequences of opioid seeking.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15.
    Goodall, Rhys E. A.
    et al.
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Parackal, Abhijith S
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Faber, Felix A.
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Armiento, Rickard
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lee, Alpha A.
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Rapid discovery of stable materials by coordinate-free coarse graining2022In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 8, no 30, article id eabn4117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A fundamental challenge in materials science pertains to elucidating the relationship between stoichiometry, stability, structure, and property. Recent advances have shown that machine learning can be used to learn such relationships, allowing the stability and functional properties of materials to be accurately predicted. However, most of these approaches use atomic coordinates as input and are thus bottlenecked by crystal structure identification when investigating previously unidentified materials. Our approach solves this bottleneck by coarse-graining the infinite search space of atomic coordinates into a combinatorially enumerable search space. The key idea is to use Wyckoff representations, coordinate-free sets of symmetry-related positions in a crystal, as the input to a machine learning model. Our model demonstrates exceptionally high precision in finding unknown theoretically stable materials, identifying 1569 materials that lie below the known convex hull of previously calculated materials from just 5675 ab initio calculations. Our approach opens up fundamental advances in computational materials discovery.

  • 16.
    Gorbunov, Andrey V.
    et al.
    Eindhoven Univ Technol, Netherlands.
    Iglesias, Miguel Garcia
    Eindhoven Univ Technol, Netherlands.
    Guilleme, Julia
    Univ Autonoma Madrid, Spain.
    Cornelissen, Tim
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Roelofs, W. S. Christian
    Eindhoven Univ Technol, Netherlands.
    Torres, Tomas
    Univ Autonoma Madrid, Spain; IM DEA Nanociencia, Spain.
    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David
    Univ Autonoma Madrid, Spain.
    Meijer, E. W.
    Eindhoven Univ Technol, Netherlands.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Eindhoven Univ Technol, Netherlands.
    Ferroelectric self-assembled molecular materials showing both rectifying and switchable conductivity2017In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 3, no 9, article id e1701017Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advanced molecular materials that combine two or more physical properties are typically constructed by combining different molecules, each being responsible for one of the properties required. Ideally, single molecules could take care of this combined functionality, provided they are self-assembled correctly and endowed with different functional subunits whose strong electronic coupling may lead to the emergence of unprecedented and exciting properties. We present a class of disc-like semiconducting organic molecules that are functionalized with strong dipolar side groups. Supramolecular organization of these materials provides long-range polar order that supports collective ferroelectric behavior of the side groups as well as charge transport through the stacked semiconducting cores. The ferroelectric polarization in these supramolecular polymers is found to couple to the charge transport and leads to a bulk conductivity that is both switchable and rectifying. An intuitive model is developed and found to quantitatively reproduce the experimental observations. In a larger perspective, these results highlight the possibility of modulating material properties using the large electric fields associated with ferroelectric polarization.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pshyk, Oleksandr V.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Toward an increased reliability of chemical bonding assignment in insulating samples by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy2023In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 9, no 37, article id eadi3192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra from solid samples are conventionally referenced to the spectrometer Fermi level (FL). While, in the case of metallic samples, alignment of the sample and the spectrometer FLs can be directly verified from the measured Fermi edge position, thus allowing to assess the surface electrical potential, this is not a workable option for insulators. When applied, it generates a large spread in reported binding energy values that often exceed involved chemical shifts. By depositing insulating amorphous alumina thin films on a variety of conducting substrates with different work functions, we show not only that FL referencing fails but also that the Al2O3 energy levels align instead to the vacuum level, as postulated in the early days of XPS. Based on these model experiments that can be repeated for all sorts of thin-film insulators, a solution to the binding energy reference problem is proposed for reliable assessment of chemical bonding.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18.
    Hellenbrand, Markus
    et al.
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Bakhit, Babak
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Cambridge, England; Univ Cambridge, England.
    Dou, Hongyi
    Purdue Univ, IN 47907 USA.
    Xiao, Ming
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Hill, Megan O.
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Sun, Zhuotong
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Mehonic, Adnan
    UCL, England.
    Chen, Aiping
    Los Alamos Natl Lab, NM 87545 USA.
    Jia, Quanxi
    Univ Buffalo, NY 14260 USA.
    Wang, Haiyan
    Purdue Univ, IN 47907 USA.
    MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Thin-film design of amorphous hafnium oxide nanocomposites enabling strong interfacial resistive switching uniformity2023In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 9, no 25, article id eadg1946Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A design concept of phase-separated amorphous nanocomposite thin films is presented that realizes interfacial resistive switching (RS) in hafnium oxide-based devices. The films are formed by incorporating an average of 7% Ba into hafnium oxide during pulsed laser deposition at temperatures <= 400 degrees C. The added Ba prevents the films from crystallizing and leads to similar to 20-nm-thin films consisting of an amorphous HfOx host matrix interspersed with similar to 2-nm-wide, similar to 5-to-10-nm-pitch Ba-rich amorphous nanocolumns penetrating approximately two-thirds through the films. This restricts the RS to an interfacial Schottky-like energy barrier whose magnitude is tuned by ionic migration under an applied electric field. Resulting devices achieve stable cycle-to-cycle, device-to-device, and sample-to-sample reproducibility with a measured switching endurance of >= 10(4) cycles for a memory window >= 10 at switching voltages of +/- 2 V. Each device can be set to multiple intermediate resistance states, which enables synaptic spike-timing-dependent plasticity. The presented concept unlocks additional design variables for RS devices.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 19.
    Iwamoto, Hideki
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Zhang, Yin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Seki, Takahiro
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Yang, Yunlong
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nakamura, Masaki
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Wang, Jian
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Yang, Xiaojuan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Tongji Univ, Peoples R China.
    Torimura, Takuji
    Kurume Univ, Japan.
    Cao, Yihai
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Univ Leicester, England; Glenfield Hosp, England.
    PlGF-induced VEGFR1-dependent vascular remodeling determines opposing antitumor effects and drug resistance to Dll4-Notch inhibitors2015In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 1, no 3, article id e1400244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inhibition of Dll4 (delta-like ligand 4)-Notch signaling-mediated tumor angiogenesis is an attractive approach in cancer therapy. However, inhibition of Dll4-Notch signaling has produced different effects in various tumors, and no biomarkers are available for predicting the anti-Dll4-Notch-associated antitumor activity. We show that human and mouse tumor cell-derived placental growth factor (PlGF) is a key determinant of the Dll4-Notch-induced vascular remodeling and tumor growth. In natural PlGF-expressing human tumors, inhibition of Dll4-Notch signaling markedly accelerated tumor growth by increasing blood perfusion in nonleaking tumor vasculatures. Conversely, in PlGF-negative tumors, Dll4 inhibition suppressed tumor growth by the formation of nonproductive and leaky vessels. Surprisingly, genetic inactivation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1) completely abrogated the PlGF-modulated vascular remodeling and tumor growth, indicating a crucial role for VEGFR1-mediated signals in modulating Dll4-Notch functions. These findings provide mechanistic insights on PlGF-VEGFR1 signaling in the modulation of the Dll4-Notch pathway in angiogenesis and tumor growth, and have therapeutic implications of PlGF as a biomarker for predicting the antitumor benefits of Dll4 and Notch inhibitors.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 20.
    Jakesova, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Silverå Ejneby, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Derek, Vedran
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schmidt, Tony
    Med Univ Graz, Austria.
    Gryszel, Maciej
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brask, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schindl, Rainer
    Med Univ Graz, Austria.
    Simon, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Elinder, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Glowacki, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Optoelectronic control of single cells using organic photocapacitors2019In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 5, no 4, article id eaav5265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Optical control of the electrophysiology of single cells can be a powerful tool for biomedical research and technology. Here, we report organic electrolytic photocapacitors (OEPCs), devices that function as extracellular capacitive electrodes for stimulating cells. OEPCs consist of transparent conductor layers covered with a donor-acceptor bilayer of organic photoconductors. This device produces an open-circuit voltage in a physiological solution of 330 mV upon illumination using light in a tissue transparency window of 630 to 660 nm. We have performed electrophysiological recordings on Xenopus laevis oocytes, finding rapid (time constants, 50 mu s to 5 ms) photoinduced transient changes in the range of 20 to 110 mV. We measure photoinduced opening of potassium channels, conclusively proving that the OEPC effectively depolarizes the cell membrane. Our results demonstrate that the OEPC can be a versatile nongenetic technique for optical manipulation of electrophysiology and currently represents one of the simplest and most stable and efficient optical stimulation solutions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 21.
    Jogenfors, Jonathan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Information Coding. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Elhassan, Ashraf M
    Physics Department, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ahrens, Johan
    Physics Department, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bourennane, Mohamed
    Physics Department, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Jan-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Information Coding. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hacking the Bell test using classical light in energy-time entanglement–based quantum key distribution2015In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 1, no 11, p. 1-7, article id e1500793Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Photonic systems based on energy-time entanglement have been proposed to test local realism using the Bell inequality. A violation of this inequality normally also certifies security of device-independent quantum key distribution (QKD) so that an attacker cannot eavesdrop or control the system. We show how this security test can be circumvented in energy-time entangled systems when using standard avalanche photodetectors, allowing an attacker to compromise the system without leaving a trace. We reach Bell values up to 3.63 at 97.6% faked detector efficiency using tailored pulses of classical light, which exceeds even the quantum prediction. This is the first demonstration of a violation-faking source that gives both tunable violation and high faked detector efficiency. The implications are severe: the standard Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality cannot be used to show device-independent security for energy-time entanglement setups based on Franson’s configuration. However, device-independent security can be reestablished, and we conclude by listing a number of improved tests and experimental setups that would protect against all current and future attacks of this type.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 22.
    Jonsson, Amanda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Arbring Sjöström, Theresia
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tybrandt, Klas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simon, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chemical delivery array with millisecond neurotransmitter release2016In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 2, no 11, article id e1601340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technologies that restore or augment dysfunctional neural signaling represent a promising route to deeper understanding and new therapies for neurological disorders. Because of the chemical specificity and subsecond signaling of the nervous system, these technologies should be able to release specific neurotransmitters at specific locations with millisecond resolution. We have previously demonstrated an organic electronic lateral electrophoresis technology capable of precise delivery of charged compounds, such as neurotransmitters. However, this technology, the organic electronic ion pump, has been limited to a single delivery point, or several simultaneously addressed outlets, with switch-on speeds of seconds. We report on a vertical neurotransmitter delivery device, configured as an array with individually controlled delivery points and a temporal resolution of 50 ms. This is achieved by supplementing lateral electrophoresis with a control electrode and an ion diode at each delivery point to allow addressing and limit leakage. By delivering local pulses of neurotransmitters with spatiotemporal dynamics approaching synaptic function, the high-speed delivery array promises unprecedented access to neural signaling and a path toward biochemically regulated neural prostheses.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 23.
    Jonsson, Amanda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Song, Zhiyang
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nilsson, David
    Acreo Swedish ICT AB, SE-601 17 Norrköping, Sweden.
    Meyerson, Björn A.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Simon, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Linderoth, Bengt
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Therapy using implanted organic bioelectronics2015In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 1, no 4, article id e1500039Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many drugs provide their therapeutic action only at specific sites in the body, but are administered in ways that cause the drug’s spread throughout the organism. This can lead to serious side effects. Local delivery from an implanted device may avoid these issues, especially if the delivery rate can be tuned according to the need of the patient. We turned to electronically and ionically conducting polymers to design a device that could be implanted and used for local electrically controlled delivery of therapeutics. The conducting polymers in our device allow electronic pulses to be transduced into biological signals, in the form of ionic and molecular fluxes, which provide a way of interfacing biology with electronics. Devices based on conducting polymers and polyelectrolytes have been demonstrated in controlled substance delivery to neural tissue, biosensing, and neural recording and stimulation. While providing proof of principle of bioelectronic integration, such demonstrations have been performed in vitro or in anesthetized animals. Here, we demonstrate the efficacy of an implantable organic electronic delivery device for the treatment of neuropathic pain in an animal model. Devices were implanted onto the spinal cord of rats, and 2 days after implantation, local delivery of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was initiated. Highly localized delivery resulted in a significant decrease in pain response with low dosage and no observable side effects. This demonstration of organic bioelectronics-based therapy in awake animals illustrates a viable alternative to existing pain treatments, paving the way for future implantable bioelectronic therapeutics. Keywords

  • 24.
    Keuschnigg, Marc
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mutgan, Selcan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hedström, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Urban scaling and the regional divide2019In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 5, no 1, article id eaav0042Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Superlinear growth in cities has been explained as an emergent consequence of increased social interactions in dense urban environments. Using geocoded microdata from Swedish population registers, we remove population composition effects from the scaling relation of wage income to test how much of the previously reported superlinear scaling is truly attributable to increased social interconnectivity in cities. The Swedish data confirm the previously reported scaling relations on the aggregate level, but they provide better information on the micromechanisms responsible for them. We find that the standard interpretation of urban scaling is incomplete as social interactions only explain about half of the scaling parameter of wage income and that scaling relations substantively reflect differences in cities sociodemographic composition. Those differences are generated by selective migration of highly productive individuals into larger cities. Big cities grow through their attraction of talent from their hinterlands and the already-privileged benefit disproportionally from urban agglomeration.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 25.
    Lan, Yang
    et al.
    McGill Univ, Canada.
    Dringoli, Benjamin J.
    McGill Univ, Canada.
    Valverde-Chavez, David A.
    McGill Univ, Canada.
    Ponseca, Carlito
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sutton, Mark
    McGill Univ, Canada.
    He, Yihui
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Cooke, David G.
    McGill Univ, Canada.
    Ultrafast correlated charge and lattice motion in a hybrid metal halide perovskite2019In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 5, no 5, article id eaaw5558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hybrid organic-inorganic halide perovskites have shown remarkable optoelectronic properties, exhibiting an impressive tolerance to defects believed to originate from correlated motion of charge carriers and the polar lattice forming large polarons. Few experimental techniques are capable of directly probing these correlations, requiring simultaneous sub-millielectron volt energy and femtosecond temporal resolution after absorption of a photon. Here, we use time-resolved multi-THz spectroscopy, sensitive to the internal excitations of the polaron, to temporally and energetically resolve the coherent coupling of charges to longitudinal optical phonons in single-crystal CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPI). We observe room temperature intraband quantum beats arising from the coherent displacement of charge from the coupled phonon cloud. Our measurements provide strong evidence for the existence of polarons in MAPI at room temperature, suggesting that electron/hole-phonon coupling is a defining aspect of the hybrid metal-halide perovskites contributing to the protection from scattering and enhanced carrier lifetimes that define their usefulness in devices.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 26.
    Maziz, Ali
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Concas, Alexandre
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Khaldi, Alexandre
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Stålhand, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Persson, Nils-Krister
    Swedish School of Textiles (THS), SmartTextiles, University of Borås, 50190 Borås, Sweden.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Knitting and weaving artificial muscles2017In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 3, no 1, article id e1600327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A need exists for artificial muscles that are silent, soft, and compliant, with performance characteristics similar to those of skeletal muscle, enabling natural interaction of assistive devices with humans. By combining one of humankind’s oldest technologies, textile processing, with electroactive polymers, we demonstrate here the feasibility of wearable, soft artificial muscles made by weaving and knitting, with tunable force and strain. These textile actuators were produced from cellulose yarns assembled into fabrics and coated with conducting polymers using a metal-free deposition. To increase the output force, we assembled yarns in parallel by weaving. The force scaled linearly with the number of yarns in the woven fabric. To amplify the strain, we knitted a stretchable fabric, exhibiting a 53-fold increase in strain. In addition, the textile construction added mechanical stability to the actuators. Textile processing permits scalable and rational production of wearable artificial muscles, and enables novel ways to design assistive devices.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 27.
    McTiernan, Christopher D.
    et al.
    Hop Maison Neuve Rosemont, Canada; Univ Montreal, Canada; Univ Montreal, Canada; Univ Ottawa, Canada.
    Simpson, Fiona C.
    Hop Maison Neuve Rosemont, Canada; Univ Montreal, Canada; Univ Montreal, Canada.
    Haagdorens, Michel
    Univ Antwerp, Belgium.
    Samarawickrama, Chameen
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Sydney, Australia.
    Hunter, Damien
    Univ Sydney, Australia.
    Buznyk, Oleksiy
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Sensory Organs and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Sensory Organs and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lewis, Philip
    Cardiff Univ, Wales.
    Pintelon, Isabel
    Univ Antwerp, Belgium.
    Olsen, David
    FibroGen Inc, CA USA.
    Edin, Elle
    Hop Maison Neuve Rosemont, Canada; Univ Montreal, Canada; Univ Montreal, Canada.
    Groleau, Marc
    Hop Maison Neuve Rosemont, Canada.
    Allan, Bruce D.
    Moorfields Eye Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England; UCL Inst Ophthalmol, England.
    Griffith, May
    Hop Maison Neuve Rosemont, Canada; Univ Montreal, Canada; Univ Montreal, Canada.
    LiQD Cornea: Pro-regeneration collagen mimetics as patches and alternatives to corneal transplantation2020In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 6, no 25, article id eaba2187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transplantation with donor corneas is the mainstay for treating corneal blindness, but a severe worldwide shortage necessitates the development of other treatment options. Corneal perforation from infection or inflammation is sealed with cyanoacrylate glue. However, the resulting cytotoxicity requires transplantation. LiQD Cornea is an alternative to conventional corneal transplantation and sealants. It is a cell-free, liquid hydrogel matrix for corneal regeneration, comprising short collagen-like peptides conjugated with polyethylene glycol and mixed with fibrinogen to promote adhesion within tissue defects. Gelation occurs spontaneously at body temperature within 5 min. Light exposure is not required-particularly advantageous because patients with corneal inflammation are typically photophobic. The self-assembling, fully defined, synthetic collagen analog is much less costly than human recombinant collagen and reduces the risk of immune rejection associated with xenogeneic materials. In situ gelation potentially allows for clinical application in outpatient clinics instead of operating theaters, maximizing practicality, and minimizing health care costs.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 28.
    Miao, Kevin C.
    et al.
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Bourassa, Alexandre
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Anderson, Christopher P.
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Whiteley, Samuel J.
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Crook, Alexander L.
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Bayliss, Sam L.
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Wolfowicz, Gary
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Thiering, Gergo
    Hungarian Acad Sci, Hungary.
    Udvarhelyi, Peter
    Hungarian Acad Sci, Hungary; Eotvos Lorand Univ, Hungary.
    Ivády, Viktor
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Hungarian Acad Sci, Hungary.
    Abe, Hiroshi
    Natl Inst Quantum and Radiol Sci and Technol, Japan.
    Ohshima, Takeshi
    Natl Inst Quantum and Radiol Sci and Technol, Japan.
    Gali, Adam
    Hungarian Acad Sci, Hungary; Budapest Univ Technol and Econ, Hungary.
    Awschalom, David D.
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA; Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA; Argonne Natl Lab, IL 60439 USA; Argonne Natl Lab, IL 60439 USA.
    Electrically driven optical interferometry with spins in silicon carbide2019In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 5, no 11, article id eaay0527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interfacing solid-state defect electron spins to other quantum systems is an ongoing challenge. The ground-state spins weak coupling to its environment not only bestows excellent coherence properties but also limits desired drive fields. The excited-state orbitals of these electrons, however, can exhibit stronger coupling to phononic and electric fields. Here, we demonstrate electrically driven coherent quantum interference in the optical transition of single, basally oriented divacancies in commercially available 4H silicon carbide. By applying microwave frequency electric fields, we coherently drive the divacancys excited-state orbitals and induce Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg interference fringes in the resonant optical absorption spectrum. In addition, we find remarkably coherent optical and spin subsystems enabled by the basal divacancys symmetry. These properties establish divacancies as strong candidates for quantum communication and hybrid system applications, where simultaneous control over optical and spin degrees of freedom is paramount.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 29.
    Nagi, Saad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Sydney, Australia.
    Marshall, Andrew G.
    Univ Manchester, England; Liverpool John Moores Univ, England.
    Makdani, Adarsh
    Liverpool John Moores Univ, England.
    Jarocka, Ewa
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Liljencrantz, Jaquette
    Natl Ctr Complementary and Integrat Hlth, MD 20892 USA; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ridderstrom, Mikael
    Umea Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Shaikh, Sumaiya
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Sydney, Australia.
    ONeill, Francis
    Univ Liverpool, England.
    Saade, Dimah
    NINDS, MD 20892 USA.
    Donkervoort, Sandra
    NINDS, MD 20892 USA.
    Foley, A. Reghan
    NINDS, MD 20892 USA.
    Minde, Jan
    Umea Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Trulsson, Mats
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Cole, Jonathan
    Bournemouth Univ, England.
    Bonnemann, Carsten G.
    NINDS, MD 20892 USA.
    Chesler, Alexander T.
    Natl Ctr Complementary and Integrat Hlth, MD 20892 USA.
    Bushnell, M. Catherine
    Natl Ctr Complementary and Integrat Hlth, MD 20892 USA.
    McGlone, Francis
    Liverpool John Moores Univ, England; Univ Liverpool, England.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    An ultrafast system for signaling mechanical pain in human skin2019In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 5, no 7, article id eaaw1297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The canonical view is that touch is signaled by fast-conducting, thickly myelinated afferents, whereas pain is signaled by slow-conducting, thinly myelinated ("fast" pain) or unmyelinated ("slow" pain) afferents. While other mammals have thickly myelinated afferents signaling pain (ultrafast nociceptors), these have not been demonstrated in humans. Here, we performed single-unit axonal recordings (microneurography) from cutaneous mechanoreceptive afferents in healthy participants. We identified A-fiber high-threshold mechanoreceptors (A-HTMR5) that were insensitive to gentle touch, encoded noxious skin indentations, and displayed conduction velocities similar to A-fiber low-threshold mechanoreceptors. Intraneural electrical stimulation of single ultrafast A-HTMRs evoked painful percepts. Testing in patients with selective deafferentation revealed impaired pain judgments to graded mechanical stimuli only when thickly myelinated fibers were absent. This function was preserved in patients with a loss-of-function mutation in mechanotransduction channel PIEZO2.These findings demonstrate that human mechanical pain does not require PIEZO2 and can be signaled by fast-conducting, thickly myelinated afferents.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 30.
    Ning, Weihua
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bao, Jinke
    Argonne Natl Lab, IL 60439 USA.
    Puttisong, Yuttapoom
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Moro, Fabrizio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kobera, Libor
    Czech Acad Sci, Czech Republic.
    Shimono, Seiya
    Natl Def Acad, Japan.
    Wang, Linqin
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Ji, Fuxiang
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cuartero, Maria
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Kawaguchi, Shogo
    Japan Synchrotron Radiat Res Inst JASRI, Japan.
    Abbrent, Sabina
    Czech Acad Sci, Czech Republic.
    Ishibashi, Hiroki
    Osaka Prefecture Univ, Japan.
    De Marco, Roland
    Univ Sunshine Coast, Australia.
    Buyanova, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crespo, Gaston A.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Kubota, Yoshiki
    Osaka Prefecture Univ, Japan.
    Brus, Jiri
    Czech Acad Sci, Czech Republic.
    Chung, Duck Young
    Argonne Natl Lab, IL 60439 USA.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden; Westlake Univ, Peoples R China.
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.
    Argonne Natl Lab, IL 60439 USA; Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Magnetizing lead-free halide double perovskites2020In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 6, no 45, article id eabb5381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spintronics holds great potential for next-generation high-speed and low-power consumption information technology. Recently, lead halide perovskites (LHPs), which have gained great success in optoelectronics, also show interesting magnetic properties. However, the spin-related properties in LHPs originate from the spin-orbit coupling of Pb, limiting further development of these materials in spintronics. Here, we demonstrate a new generation of halide perovskites, by alloying magnetic elements into optoelectronic double perovskites, which provide rich chemical and structural diversities to host different magnetic elements. In our iron-alloyed double perovskite, Cs2Ag(Bi:Fe)Br-6, Fe3+ replaces Bi3+ and forms FeBr6 clusters that homogenously distribute throughout the double perovskite crystals. We observe a strong temperature-dependent magnetic response at temperatures below 30 K, which is tentatively attributed to a weak ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic response from localized regions. We anticipate that this work will stimulate future efforts in exploring this simple yet efficient approach to develop new spintronic materials based on lead-free double perovskites.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 31.
    Ottosson, Nina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Silverå Ejneby, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wu, Xiongyu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yazdi, Samira
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lindahl, Erik
    Stockholm University, Sweden; KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Elinder, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    A drug pocket at the lipid bilayer-potassium channel interface2017In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 3, no 10, article id e1701099Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many pharmaceutical drugs against neurological and cardiovascular disorders exert their therapeutic effects by binding to specific sites on voltage-gated ion channels of neurons or cardiomyocytes. To date, all molecules targeting known ion channel sites bind to protein pockets that are mainly surrounded by water. We describe a lipid-protein drug-binding pocket of a potassium channel. We synthesized and electrophysiologically tested 125 derivatives, analogs, and related compounds to dehydroabietic acid. Functional data in combination with docking and molecular dynamics simulations mapped a binding site for small-molecule compounds at the interface between the lipid bilayer and the transmembrane segments S3 and S4 of the voltage-sensor domain. This fundamentally new binding site for small-molecule compounds paves the way for the design of new types of drugs against diseases caused by altered excitability.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 32.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    et al.
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, United States.
    Wei, B.
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, United States.
    Kuo, C.-C.
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, United States.
    Pathak, S.
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, College Park, PA, United States.
    Farrell, B.
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, United States.
    Martin, D.C.
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, United States; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, United States.
    Enhanced PEDOT adhesion on solid substrates with electrografted P(EDOT-NH2)2017In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 3, no 3, article id e1600448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conjugated polymers, such as poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) (PEDOT), have emerged as promising materials for interfacing biomedical devices with tissue because of their relatively soft mechanical properties, versatile organic chemistry, and inherent ability to conduct both ions and electrons. However, their limited adhesion to substrates is a concern for in vivo applications. We report an electrografting method to create covalently bonded PEDOT on solid substrates. An amine-functionalized EDOT derivative (2,3-dihydrothieno[3,4-b][1,4]dioxin-2-yl)methanamine (EDOT-NH2), was synthesized and then electrografted onto conducting substrates including platinum, iridium, and indium tin oxide. The electrografting process was performed under slightly basic conditions with an overpotential of ~2 to 3 V. A nonconjugated, cross-linked, and well-adherent P(EDOT-NH2)–based polymer coating was obtained. We found that the P(EDOT-NH2) polymer coating did not block the charge transport through the interface. Subsequent PEDOT electrochemical deposition onto P(EDOT-NH2)–modified electrodes showed comparable electroactivity to pristine PEDOT coating. With P(EDOT-NH2) as an anchoring layer, PEDOT coating showed greatly enhanced adhesion. The modified coating could withstand extensive ultrasonication (1 hour) without significant cracking or delamination, whereas PEDOT typically delaminated after seconds of sonication. Therefore, this is an effective means to selectively modify microelectrodes with highly adherent and highly conductive polymer coatings as direct neural interfaces. © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved.

  • 33.
    Parks, Matthew M.
    et al.
    Weill Cornell Med, NY 10065 USA.
    Kurylo, Chad M.
    Weill Cornell Med, NY 10065 USA.
    Dass, Randall A.
    Weill Cornell Med, NY 10065 USA.
    Bojmar, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Weill Cornell Med, NY 10065 USA; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lyden, David
    Weill Cornell Med, NY 10065 USA; Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, NY 10065 USA.
    Vincent, C. Theresa
    Weill Cornell Med, NY 10065 USA; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Blanchard, Scott C.
    Weill Cornell Med, NY 10065 USA.
    Variant ribosomal RNA alleles are conserved and exhibit tissue-specific expression2018In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 4, no 2, article id eaao0665Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ribosome, the integration point for protein synthesis in the cell, is conventionally considered a homogeneous molecular assembly that only passively contributes to gene expression. Yet, epigenetic features of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) operon and changes in the ribosomes molecular composition have been associated with disease phenotypes, suggesting that the ribosome itself may possess inherent regulatory capacity. Analyzing whole-genome sequencing data from the 1000 Genomes Project and the Mouse Genomes Project, we find that rDNA copy number varies widely across individuals, and we identify pervasive intra-and interindividual nucleotide variation in the 5S, 5.8S, 18S, and 28S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes of both human and mouse. Conserved rRNA sequence heterogeneities map to functional centers of the assembled ribosome, variant rRNA alleles exhibit tissue-specific expression, and ribosomes bearing variant rRNA alleles are present in the actively translating ribosome pool. These findings provide a critical framework for exploring the possibility that the expression of genomically encoded variant rRNA alleles gives rise to physically and functionally heterogeneous ribosomes that contribute to mammalian physiology and human disease.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 34.
    Reusch, Thorsten B. H.
    et al.
    GEOMAR Helmholtz Ctr Ocean Res Kiel, Germany.
    Dierking, Jan
    GEOMAR Helmholtz Ctr Ocean Res Kiel, Germany.
    Andersson, Helen C.
    Swedish Meteorol and Hydrol Inst, Sweden.
    Bonsdorff, Erik
    Abo Akad Univ, Finland.
    Carstensen, Jacob
    Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    Casini, Michele
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Czajkowski, Mikolaj
    Univ Warsaw, Poland.
    Hasler, Berit
    Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    Hinsby, Klaus
    Geol Survey Denmark and Greenland, Denmark.
    Hyytiainen, Kari
    Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Johannesson, Kerstin
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jomaa, Seifeddine
    UFZ Helmholtz Ctr Environm Res, Germany.
    Jormalainen, Veijo
    Univ Turku, Finland.
    Kuosa, Harri
    Finnish Environm Inst SYKE, Finland.
    Kurland, Sara
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Laikre, Linda
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    MacKenzie, Brian R.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Margonski, Piotr
    Natl Marine Fisheries Res Inst, Poland.
    Melzner, Frank
    GEOMAR Helmholtz Ctr Ocean Res Kiel, Germany.
    Oesterwind, Daniel
    Inst Balt Sea Fisheries, Germany.
    Ojaveer, Henn
    Univ Tartu, Estonia.
    Refsgaard, Jens Christian
    Geol Survey Denmark and Greenland, Denmark.
    Sandstrom, Annica
    Lulea Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Schwarz, Gerald
    Thuenen Inst Farm Econ, Germany.
    Tonderski, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Winder, Monika
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Zandersen, Marianne
    Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    The Baltic Sea as a time machine for the future coastal ocean2018In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 4, no 5, article id eaar8195Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coastal global oceans are expected to undergo drastic changes driven by climate change and increasing anthropogenic pressures in coming decades. Predicting specific future conditions and assessing the best management strategies to maintain ecosystem integrity and sustainable resource use are difficult, because of multiple interacting pressures, uncertain projections, and a lack of test cases for management. We argue that the Baltic Sea can serve as a time machine to study consequences and mitigation of future coastal perturbations, due to its unique combination of an early history of multistressor disturbance and ecosystem deterioration and early implementation of cross-border environmental management to address these problems. The Baltic Sea also stands out in providing a strong scientific foundation and accessibility to long-term data series that provide a unique opportunity to assess the efficacy of management actions to address the breakdown of ecosystem functions. Trend reversals such as the return of top predators, recovering fish stocks, and reduced input of nutrient and harmful substances could be achieved only by implementing an international, cooperative governance structure transcending its complex multistate policy setting, with integrated management of watershed and sea. The Baltic Sea also demonstrates how rapidly progressing global pressures, particularly warming of Baltic waters and the surrounding catchment area, can offset the efficacy of current management approaches. This situation calls for management that is (i) conservative to provide a buffer against regionally unmanageable global perturbations, (ii) adaptive to react to new management challenges, and, ultimately, (iii) multisectorial and integrative to address conflicts associated with economic trade-offs.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 35.
    Sangiovanni, Davide
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kaufmann, Kevin
    Univ Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA.
    Vecchio, Kenneth
    Univ Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA.
    Valence electron concentration as key parameter to control the fracture resistance of refractory high-entropy carbides2023In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 9, no 37, article id eadi2960Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although high-entropy carbides (HECs) have hardness often superior to that of parent compounds, their brittleness-a problem shared with most ceramics-has severely limited their reliability. Refractory HECs in particular are attracting considerable interest due to their unique combination of mechanical and physical properties, tunable over a vast compositional space. Here, combining statistics of crack formation in bulk specimens subject to mild, moderate, and severe nanoindentation loading with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of alloys under tension, we show that the resistance to fracture of cubic-B1 HECs correlates with their valence electron concentration (VEC). Electronic structure analyses show that VEC greater than or similar to 9.4 electrons per formula unit enhances alloy fracture resistance due to a facile rehybridization of electronic metallic states, which activates transformation plasticity at the yield point. Our work demonstrates a reliable strategy for computationally guided and rule based (i.e., VEC) engineering of deformation mechanisms in high entropy, solid solution, and doped ceramics.

  • 36.
    Sha, Bo
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Johansson, Jana
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Salter, Matthew E.
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden; Bolin Ctr Climate Res, Sweden.
    Blichner, Sara M.
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Cousins, Ian T.
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Constraining global transport of perfluoroalkyl acids on sea spray aerosol using field measurements2024In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 10, no 14, article id eadl1026Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are highly persistent anthropogenic pollutants that have been detected in the global oceans. Our previous laboratory studies demonstrated that PFAAs in seawater are remobilized to the air in sea spray aerosols (SSAs). Here, we conducted field experiments along a north-south transect of the Atlantic Ocean to study the enrichment of PFAAs in SSA. We show that in some cases PFAAs were enriched >100,000 times in the SSA relative to seawater concentrations. On the basis of the results of the field experiments, we estimate that the secondary emission of certain PFAAs from the global oceans via SSA emission is comparable to or greater than estimates for the other known global sources of PFAAs to the atmosphere from manufacturing emissions and precursor degradation.

  • 37.
    Shiba, Koichiro
    et al.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, MA 02115 USA; Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, MA 02115 USA.
    Daoud, Adel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, MA USA; Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Hikichi, Hiroyuki
    Kitasato Univ, Japan.
    Yazawa, Aki
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, MA 02115 USA.
    Aida, Jun
    Tokyo Med & Dent Univ, Japan.
    Kondo, Katsunori
    Chiba Univ, Japan; Natl Ctr Geriatr & Gerontol, Japan.
    Kawachi, Ichiro
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, MA 02115 USA.
    Heterogeneity in cognitive disability after a major disaster: A natural experiment study2021In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 7, no 40, article id eabj2610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive disability following traumatic experiences of disaster has been documented; however, little is known about heterogeneity in the association across individuals. In this natural experiment study of approximately 3000 Japanese older adults in an area directly affected by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake, the baseline survey was established 7 months before the 2011 earthquake. To inductively identify heterogeneity in post-disaster cognitive disability by predisaster characteristics, we applied a machine learning-based causal inference approach-generalized random forest. We identified strong evidence for heterogeneity in the association between home loss and cognitive disability objectively assessed 2.5 and 5.5 years after the 2011 earthquake. The subgroups with the strongest disaster-dementia associations tended to be from low socioeconomic backgrounds and have predisaster health problems. The study demonstrated that some subpopulations are particularly prone to experience cognitive disability after disasters, which could be overlooked in studies assessing population average associations only.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 38.
    Stavrinidou, Eleni
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gabrielsson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gomez, Eliot
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nilsson, Ove
    Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden..
    Simon, Daniel T.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Electronic plants2015In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 1, no 10, p. 1-8, article id e1501136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The roots, stems, leaves, and vascular circuitry of higher plants are responsible for conveying the chemical signals that regulate growth and functions. From a certain perspective, these features are analogous to the contacts, interconnections, devices, and wires of discrete and integrated electronic circuits. Although many attempts have been made to augment plant function with electroactive materials, plants’ “circuitry” has never been directlymerged with electronics. We report analog and digital organic electronic circuits and devices manufactured in living plants. The four key components of a circuit have been achieved using the xylem, leaves, veins, and signals of the plant as the template and integral part of the circuit elements and functions. With integrated and distributed electronics in plants, one can envisage a range of applications including precision recording and regulation of physiology, energy harvesting from photosynthesis, and alternatives to genetic modification for plant optimization.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 39.
    Tommasini, Giuseppina
    et al.
    CNR, Italy; Univ Zaragoza, Spain.
    De Simone, Mariarosaria
    CNR, Italy.
    Santillo, Silvia
    CNR, Italy.
    Dufil, Gwennael
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Iencharelli, Marika
    CNR, Italy.
    Mantione, Daniele
    POLYMAT Univ Basque Country UPV EHU, Spain; Basque Fdn Sci, Spain.
    Stavrinidou, Eleni
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tino, Angela
    CNR, Italy.
    Tortiglione, Claudia
    CNR, Italy.
    In vivo neuromodulation of animal behavior with organic semiconducting oligomers2023In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 9, no 42, article id eadi5488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modulating neural activity with electrical or chemical stimulus can be used for fundamental and applied research. Typically, neuronal stimulation is performed with intracellular and extracellular electrodes that deliver brief electrical pulses to neurons. However, alternative wireless methodologies based on functional materials may allow clinical translation of technologies to modulate neuronal function. Here, we show that the organic semiconducting oligomer 4-[2-{2,5-bis(2,3-dihydrothieno[3,4-b][1,4]dioxin-5-yl)thiophen-3-yl}ethoxy]butane-1-sulfonate (ETE-S) induces precise behaviors in the small invertebrate Hydra, which were dissected through pharmacological and electrophysiological approaches. ETE-S-induced behavioral response relies on the presence of head neurons and calcium ions and is prevented by drugs targeting ionotropic channels and muscle contraction. Moreover, ETE-S affects Hydras electrical activity enhancing the contraction burst frequency. The unexpected neuromodulatory function played by this conjugated oligomer on a simple nerve net opens intriguing research possibilities on fundamental chemical and physical phenomena behind organic bioelectronic interfaces for neuromodulation and on alternative methods that could catalyze a wide expansion of this rising technology for clinical applications.

  • 40.
    Tybrandt, Klas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zozoulenko, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chemical potential-electric double layer coupling in conjugated polymer-polyelectrolyte blends2017In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 3, no 12, article id eaao3659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conjugated polymer-polyelectrolyte blends combine and couple electronic semiconductor functionality with selective ionic transport, making them attractive as the active material in organic biosensors and bioelectronics, electrochromic displays, neuromorphic computing, and energy conversion and storage. Although extensively studied and explored, fundamental knowledge and accurate quantitative models of the coupled ion-electron functionality and transport are still lacking to predict the characteristics of electrodes and devices based on these blends. We report on a two-phase model, which couples the chemical potential of the holes, in the conjugated polymer, with the electric double layer residing at the conjugated polymer-polyelectrolyte interface. The model reproduces a wide range of experimental charging and transport data and provides a coherent theoretical framework for the system as well as local electrostatic potentials, energy levels, and charge carrier concentrations. This knowledge is crucial for future developments and optimizations of bioelectronic and energy devices based on the electronic-ionic interaction within these materials.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 41.
    Vlasceanu, Madalina
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA.
    Doell, Kimberly C.
    Department of Psychology, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA.;Department of Cognition, Emotion, and Methods in Psychology, Faculty of Psychology, University of Vienna, Vienna 1010, Austria.
    Bak-Coleman, Joseph B.
    Craig Newmark Center for Journalism Ethics and Security, Columbia University, New York, NY 10018, USA.;Institute for Rebooting Social Media, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA.
    Todorova, Boryana
    Department of Cognition, Emotion, and Methods in Psychology, Faculty of Psychology, University of Vienna, Vienna 1010, Austria.
    Berkebile-Weinberg, Michael M.
    Department of Psychology, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA.
    Grayson, Samantha J.
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
    Patel, Yash
    Department of Psychology, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA.
    Goldwert, Danielle
    Department of Psychology, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA.
    Pei, Yifei
    Department of Psychology, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA.
    Chakroff, Alek
    San Luis Obispo, CA 93405, USA.
    Pronizius, Ekaterina
    Department of Cognition, Emotion, and Methods in Psychology, Faculty of Psychology, University of Vienna, Vienna 1010, Austria.
    van den Broek, Karlijn L.
    Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University, Utrecht, 3584 CB, Netherlands.
    Vlasceanu, Denisa
    Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA.
    Constantino, Sara
    School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA.;Department of Psychology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
    Morais, Michael J.
    Amazon, Seattle, WA 98109, USA.
    Schumann, Philipp
    Department of Psychology, Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Oldenburg 26129, Germany.
    Rathje, Steve
    Department of Psychology, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA.
    Fang, Ke
    Department of Psychology, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA.
    Aglioti, Salvatore Maria
    Santa Lucia Foundation, IRCCS, Rome 179, Italy.;Department of Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome 185, Italy.
    Alfano, Mark
    Department of Philosophy, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2000, Australia.
    Alvarado-Yepez, Andy J.
    Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, San Martín de Porres 15102, Peru.
    Andersen, Angélica
    Post-Graduation Program in Linguistics, Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba 80060150, Brasil.
    Anseel, Frederik
    UNSW Business School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia.
    Apps, Matthew A. J.
    Centre for Human Brain Health, School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK.
    Asadli, Chillar
    Psychology Scientific Research Institute, Baku, Azerbaijan.
    Awuor, Fonda Jane
    Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute, Kisumu 1881-40100, Kenya.
    Azevedo, Flavio
    Department of Psychology, University of Groningen, Groningen 9712TS, Netherlands.
    Basaglia, Piero
    Department of Economics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg 20146, Germany.
    Bélanger, Jocelyn J.
    Department of Psychology, New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi 129188, United Arab Emirates.
    Berger, Sebastian
    Department of Sociology, University of Bern, Bern 3012, Switzerland.
    Bertin, Paul
    LAPCOS, Université Côte d’Azur, Nice 6357, France.;Center for Social and Cultural Psychology, Université libre de Bruxelles, Brussels 1050, Belgium.
    Białek, Michał
    Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Historical and Pedagogical Sciences, University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw 50-120, Poland.
    Bialobrzeska, Olga
    Institute of Psychology, SWPS University, Warsaw 03-815, Poland.
    Blaya-Burgo, Michelle
    Department of Psychology, Division of Behavioral & Organizational Sciences, Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, NH 91711, USA.
    Bleize, Daniëlle N. M.
    Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, 6500 HE, Netherlands.
    Bø, Simen
    Department of Strategy and Management, Norwegian School of Economics, Bergen 5045, Norway.
    Boecker, Lea
    Department of Economic Psychology, Social Psychology and Experimental Methods, Leuphana University Lüneburg, Lüneburg 21335, Germany.
    Boggio, Paulo S.
    Social and Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Mackenzie Presbyterian University, Sao Paulo 1241001, Brazil.
    Borau, Sylvie
    Toulouse Business School, Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse. Toulouse, 31000, France.
    Bos, Björn
    Department of Economics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg 20146, Hamburg.
    Bouguettaya, Ayoub
    School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK.
    Brauer, Markus
    Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA.
    Brick, Cameron
    Department of Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, 1018 WT, Netherlands.;Department of Psychology, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Elverum 2418, Norway.
    Brik, Tymofii
    Policy Research Department, Kyiv School of Economics, Kyiv 2000, Ukraine.
    Briker, Roman
    Department of Organisation, Strategy, and Entrepreneurship, School of Business and Economics, Maastricht University, Maastricht 6211 LK, Netherlands.
    Brosch, Tobias
    Department of Psychology and Swiss Center for Affective Sciences, University of Geneva, Geneva 1205, Switzerland.
    Buchel, Ondrej
    Institute for Sociology of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava 81364, Slovakia.
    Buonauro, Daniel
    Psychological Science, Pomona College, Claremont, CA 91711, USA.
    Butalia, Radhika
    Department of Movement Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven 3001, Belgium.
    Carvacho, Héctor
    Escuela de Psicología, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile.
    Koppel, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Västfjäll, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Decision Research .
    Tinghög, Gustav
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Addressing climate change with behavioral science: A global intervention tournament in 63 countries2024In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 10, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Effectively reducing climate change requires marked, global behavior change. However, it is unclear which strategies are most likely to motivate people to change their climate beliefs and behaviors. Here, we tested 11 expert-crowdsourced interventions on four climate mitigation outcomes: beliefs, policy support, information sharing intention, and an effortful tree-planting behavioral task. Across 59,440 participants from 63 countries, the interventions’ effectiveness was small, largely limited to nonclimate skeptics, and differed across outcomes: Beliefs were strengthened mostly by decreasing psychological distance (by 2.3%), policy support by writing a letter to a future-generation member (2.6%), information sharing by negative emotion induction (12.1%), and no intervention increased the more effortful behavior—several interventions even reduced tree planting. Last, the effects of each intervention differed depending on people’s initial climate beliefs. These findings suggest that the impact of behavioral climate interventions varies across audiences and target behaviors.

  • 42.
    Wu, Bo
    et al.
    South China Normal Univ, Peoples R China; Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore; Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China; Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Ning, Weihua
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Xu, Qiang
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore.
    Manjappa, Manukumara
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore.
    Feng, Minjun
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore.
    Ye, Senyun
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore.
    Fu, Jianhui
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore.
    Lie, Stener
    Energy Res Inst NTU ERI N, Singapore.
    Yin, Tingting
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore.
    Wang, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Goh, Teck Wee
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore.
    Harikesh, Padinhare Cholakkal
    Energy Res Inst NTU ERI N, Singapore.
    Tay, Yong Kang Eugene
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore.
    Shen, Ze Xiang
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore; NTU Thales, Singapore.
    Huang, Fuqiang
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Singh, Ranjan
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore.
    Zhou, Guofu
    South China Normal Univ, Peoples R China; Shenzhen Guohua Optoelect Technol Co Ltd, Peoples R China.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sum, Tze Chien
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore.
    Strong self-trapping by deformation potential limits photovoltaic performance in bismuth double perovskite2021In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 7, no 8, article id eabd3160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bismuth-based double perovskite Cs2AgBiBr6 is regarded as a potential candidate for low-toxicity, high-stability perovskite solar cells. However, its performance is far from satisfactory. Albeit being an indirect bandgap semiconductor, we observe bright emission with large bimolecular recombination coefficient (reaching 4.5 +/- 0.1 x 10(-11) cm(3) s(-1)) and low charge carrier mobility (around 0.05 cm(2) s(-1) V-1). Besides intermediate Frohlich couplings present in both Pb-based perovskites and Cs2AgBiBr6, we uncover evidence of strong deformation potential by acoustic phonons in the latter through transient reflection, time-resolved terahertz measurements, and density functional theory calculations. The Frohlich and deformation potentials synergistically lead to ultrafast self-trapping of free carriers forming polarons highly localized on a few units of the lattice within a few picoseconds, which also breaks down the electronic band picture, leading to efficient radiative recombination. The strong self-trapping in Cs2AgBiBr6 could impose intrinsic limitations for its application in photovoltaics.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 43.
    Zarb, Yvette
    et al.
    Zurich Univ, Switzerland; Univ Zurich, Switzerland; Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Switzerland; Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Germany.
    Sridhar, Sucheta
    Zurich Univ, Switzerland; Univ Zurich, Switzerland; Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Switzerland.
    Nassiri, Sina
    Swiss Inst Bioinformat, Switzerland.
    Utz, Sebastian Guido
    Univ Zurich, Switzerland.
    Schaffenrath, Johanna
    Zurich Univ, Switzerland; Univ Zurich, Switzerland; Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Switzerland.
    Maheshwari, Upasana
    Zurich Univ, Switzerland; Univ Zurich, Switzerland; Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Switzerland.
    Rushing, Elisabeth J.
    Zurich Univ Hosp, Switzerland.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Delorenzi, Mauro
    Swiss Inst Bioinformat, Switzerland; Univ Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Colonna, Marco
    Washington Univ, MO USA.
    Greter, Melanie
    Univ Zurich, Switzerland.
    Keller, Annika
    Zurich Univ, Switzerland; Univ Zurich, Switzerland; Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Switzerland.
    Microglia control small vessel calcification via TREM22021In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 7, no 9, article id eabc4898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microglia participate in central nervous system (CNS) development and homeostasis and are often implicated in modulating disease processes. However, less is known about the role of microglia in the biology of the neurovascular unit (NVU). In particular, data are scant on whether microglia are involved in CNS vascular pathology. In this study, we use a mouse model of primary familial brain calcification, Pdgfb(ret/ret), to investigate the role of microglia in calcification of the NVU. We report that microglia enclosing vessel calcifications, coined calcification-associated microglia, display a distinct activation phenotype. Pharmacological ablation of microglia with the CSF1R inhibitor PLX5622 leads to aggravated vessel calcification. Mechanistically, we show that microglia require functional TREM2 for controlling vascular calcification. Our results demonstrate that microglial activity in the setting of pathological vascular calcification is beneficial. In addition, we identify a previously unrecognized function of microglia in halting the expansion of vascular calcification.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 44.
    Zubayer, Anton
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ghafoor, Naureen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Thorarinsdottir, Kristbjoerg Anna
    Univ Iceland, Iceland.
    Stendahl, Sjoerd
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Glavic, Artur
    Paul Scherrer Inst, Switzerland.
    Stahn, Jochen
    Paul Scherrer Inst, Switzerland.
    Nagy, Gyula
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schwartzkopf, Matthias
    DESY, Germany.
    Le Febvrier, Arnaud
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Magnus, Fridrik
    Univ Iceland, Iceland.
    Eriksson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Reflective, polarizing, and magnetically soft amorphous neutron optics with 11B-enriched B4C2024In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 10, no 7, article id eadl0402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The utilization of polarized neutrons is of great importance in scientific disciplines spanning materials science, physics, biology, and chemistry. However, state-of-the-art multilayer polarizing neutron optics have limitations, particularly low specular reflectivity and polarization at higher scattering vectors/angles, and the requirement of high external magnetic fields to saturate the polarizer magnetization. Here, we show that, by incorporating (B4C)-B-11 into Fe/Si multilayers, amorphization and smooth interfaces can be achieved, yielding higher neutron reflectivity, less diffuse scattering, and higher polarization. Magnetic coercivity is eliminated, and magnetic saturation can be reached at low external fields (>2 militesla). This approach offers prospects for substantial improvement in polarizing neutron optics with nonintrusive positioning of the polarizer, enhanced flux, increased data accuracy, and further polarizing/analyzing methods at neutron scattering facilities.

1 - 44 of 44
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf