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  • 1.
    Bergström, Aileen
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Therapy, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Evaluation of manual wheelchairs by individuals with spinal cord injuries2006In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 175-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to investigate how adults with spinal cord injury assess their satisfaction regarding various aspects and use of their manual wheelchair. Method. The Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology (QUEST 2.0) together with seven additional questions was sent to 205 adults with SCI. Results. One hundred and twenty-four responses were available. The QUEST 2.0 showed a high level of satisfaction with manual wheelchair properties. However, the respondents were less satisfied with the services offered. Ease of use and comfort were identified as most important. Eighty-nine percent of the respondents rated their level of satisfaction as 'quite satisfied' or 'very satisfied' in ease of using a manual wheelchair compared with 68% of the respondents that were 'quite satisfied' or 'very satisfied' with the level of comfort. A greater satisfaction of ease in propulsion indoors compared with sitting comfort in various activities was found. Conclusions. A discrepancy was shown between users not being as satisfied with comfort in sitting in various activities as opposed to satisfaction with propulsion. This indicates the need for increased knowledge and developments concerning individual solutions, incorporating comfort as well as ease of use of a manual wheelchair.

  • 2.
    Boman, I L
    et al.
    Danderyd University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Tham, K
    Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Granqvist, A
    Danderyd University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Bartfai, A
    Danderyd University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Using electronic aids to daily living after acquired brain injury: a study of the learning process and the usability.2007In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 23-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The purpose was to study the ability of persons with memory impairments after acquired brain injury to learn how to and use electronic aids to daily living (EADL) and to describe changes in function and quality of life.

    METHOD: Eight participants stayed in two apartments equipped with a set of basic and advanced EADL for either 4 or 6 months during an intervention time of 2 years. The teaching and learning method was influenced by certain principles of errorless learning. Ability to learn to use EADL was measured by structured observations. Function and quality of life were assessed with self-rating questionnaires.

    RESULTS: Results indicate that the participants learned to use EADL in their everyday activities. They perceived that EADL were very useful and easy to learn. Occupational performance and satisfaction with occupational performance and quality of life was improved.

    CONCLUSION: The results indicate that EADL may play an important role in facilitating everyday activities and improve satisfaction with occupational performance and quality of life for people with memory impairments. The study indicates the importance of adjusting technology to the user's needs and calls for more consideration for human-technology interaction factors.

  • 3.
    Eek, Martina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Everyday technology and 86-year-old individuals in Sweden2011In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 2, no 6, p. 123-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The aim was to investigate everyday technology use in the homes of 86-year-old individuals in Sweden regarding usage, benefits or perceived problems and to study their perception of the technical development and its influence on daily living.

     

    Method

    The design was both quantitative and qualitative. An interview was conducted at a home visit performed by an occupational therapist using a questionnaire including questions on demographics and everyday technology. In addition, a qualitative part was performed based on an interview guide. Two hundred seventy four people participated.

     

    Results

    The results indicate that watching TV was important for almost all 86-year-old individuals. This medium, combined with reading newspapers, was important for obtaining news. The most common problems in usage of everyday technology were related to visual or hearing impairments or operating difficulties. References to the Internet for further information were perceived as problematic for individuals without access to a computer. Another difficulty was automated telephone services. Cognitive deficits impeded everyday technology use and increased perceived problems.

     

    Conclusions

    Access to information and services are important elements in order to be an active participant in the society. Everyday technology is an area that should be addressed by occupational therapists in order to facilitate daily living.

  • 4.
    Lidström, Helene
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm .
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, Västerås.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Computer-based assistive technology device for use by children with physical disabilities: a cross-sectional study2012In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 287-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of children with physical disabilities who used a computer-based ATD, and to examine characteristics differences in children and youths who do or do not use computer-based ATDs, as well as, investigate differences that might influence the satisfaction of those two groups of children and youths when computers are being used for in-school and outside school activities.Method: A cross-sectional survey about computer-based activities in and outside school (n = 287) and group comparisons.Results: The prevalence of using computer-based ATDs was about 44 % (n = 127) of the children in this sample. These children were less satisfied with their computer use in education and outside school activities than the children who did not use an ATD.Conclusion: Improved coordination of the usage of computer-based ATDs in school and in the home, including service and support, could increase the opportunities for children with physical disabilities who use computer-based ATDs to perform the computer activities they want, need and are expected to do in school and outside school. [Box: see text].

  • 5.
    Lindeblad, Emma
    et al.
    Department of Psychology , Linnaeus University , Växjö , Sweden.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Department of Mathematical Sciences , Chalmers Tekniska Högskola , Göteborg , Sweden.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Svensson, Idor
    Department of Psychology , Linnaeus University , Växjö , Sweden.
    Assistive technology as reading interventions for children with reading impairments with a one-year follow-up2017In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 713-724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This pilot study investigated the possible transfer effect on reading ability in children with reading difficulties after a systematic intervention to train and compensate for reading deficiencies by using applications in smartphones and tablets. The effects of using assistive technology (AT) one year after the interventions were completely studied. School related motivation, independent learning and family relations were also considered.

  • 6.
    Möller, Saffran
    et al.
    School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hagberg, Kerstin
    Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; dDepartment of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, SwedenAdvanced Reconstruction of Extremities, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Ramstrand, Nerrolyn
    School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Perceived self-efficacy and specific self-reported outcomes in persons withlower-limb amputation using a non-microprocessor-controlled versus amicroprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee2018In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 220-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To measure self-efficacy in a group of individuals who have undergone a lower-limb amputationand investigate the relationship between self-efficacy and prosthetic-specific outcomes including prostheticuse, mobility, amputation-related problems and global health. A second purpose was to examine ifdifferences exist in outcomes based upon the type of prosthetic knee unit being used.Method: Cross-sectional study using the General Self-Efficacy (GSE) Scale and the Questionnaire forPersons with a Transfemoral Amputation (Q-TFA). Forty-two individuals participated in the study. Twentythreeused a non-microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joint (non-MPK) and 19 used a microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joint (MPK).Results: The study sample had quite high GSE scores (32/40). GSE scores were significantly correlated tothe Q-TFA prosthetic use, mobility and problem scores. High GSE scores were related to higher levels ofprosthetic use, mobility, global scores and negatively related to problem score. No significant differencewas observed between individuals using a non-MPK versus MPK joints.Conclusions: Individuals with high self-efficacy used their prosthesis to a higher degree and high self-efficacywas related to higher level of mobility, global scores and fewer problems related to the amputationin individuals who have undergone a lower-limb amputation and were using a non-MPK or MPK knee.

  • 7.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Björk, Maarit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Erdugan, Ann-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Hansson, Anna-Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Rustner, Birgitta
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    The effect of shaped wheelchair cushion and lumbar supports on under-seat pressure, comfort, and pelvic rotation.2009In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 329-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: A wheelchair seat and position help clients perform daily activities. The comfort of the wheelchair can encourage clients to participate in daily activities and can help prevent future complications. PURPOSE: This study evaluates how a shaped seat-cushion and two different back supports affect under-seat pressure, comfort, and pelvic rotation. METHOD: Thirty healthy subjects were tested using two differently equipped manual wheelchairs. One wheelchair had a Velcro adjustable back seat and a plane seat-cushion. The other wheelchair had a non-adjustable sling-back seat and a plane cushion. The second wheelchair was also equipped with a shaped cushion and/or a detachable lumbar support. Under-seat pressure, estimated comfort, and pelvic rotation were measured after 10 min in each wheelchair outfit. RESULTS: Peak pressure increased with the shaped cushion compared to the plane cushion. No significant difference in estimated comfort was found. Pelvic posterior-rotation was reduced with the adjustable or detachable back-support irrespective of the shape of the seat cushion. CONCLUSIONS: To support a neutral pelvic position and spinal curvature, a combination of a shaped cushion and a marked lumbar support is most effective.

  • 8.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Powered wheelchairs and scooters for outdoor mobility: a pilot study on costs and benefits2014In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 330-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study evaluates the effect of electric powered wheelchairs/scooters (PWC/S) on occupational performance, social participation, health, and life satisfaction. In addition, this study estimates the costs and benefits of PWC/S and describes users’ experiences with the delivery process.

    Methods: This prospective study has a before-and-after design. Postal questionnaires were sent to 24 first-time PWC/S users before delivery of the PWC/S and four months after delivery. The participants used their PWC/S for outdoor mobility.

    Results: PWC/S improved the users’ daily lives, their ability to engage in mobility-related activities, and their social participation. For a majority of the users, estimated independence, feelings of safety, and self-esteem increased although overall health and life satisfaction were not significantly affected. All users thought that the therapist had considered their needs during the providing process. Most participants (73%) were satisfied with their device at follow-up. For the 12 users who reported no change in health status between measures, the mean societal savings based on calculated costs for assistance was € 6 227 per person per year.

    Conclusions: PWC/S seems to improve occupational performance, social participation, and life satisfaction for users. Moreover, these improvements seem to have an economic advantage for both users and society.

  • 9.
    Stenberg, Gunilla
    et al.
    Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Community Medicine Rehabilitation, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Henje, Catharina
    Umeå Institute of Design, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Levi, Richard
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindström, Maria
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Living with an electric wheelchair - the user perspective.2014In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 385-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Purpose: To explore the experiences of using an electric wheelchair in daily living. Methods: Fifteen participants, eight women and seven men, living in different parts of a Nordic country were interviewed. The interviews were conducted in the home or at the workplace. Open-ended questions were used. The data were collected and analyzed according to the grounded theory. Results: Analysis resulted in one core category: "Integrating the electric wheelchair - a manifold process", describing a process commencing from initial resistance against use of an electric wheelchair, to acceptance with various extent of integration. Six categories emerged that represent this core process: incorporating the electric wheelchair into the self-identity process, calculating functional consequences, encountering the reactions of others, facing duality in movability, using proactive strategies, and being at the mercy of the system. Findings indicate that the integration process is complex and manifold. Practical, personal, and social dimensions were intertwined and significantly involved. Conclusions: Integrating an electric wheelchair is a process closely connected to symbolic value, usability, community mobility and identity. These aspects should be considered in the production, prescription, and adaptation processes. Implications for Rehabilitation Integrating an electric wheelchair is a process closely connected to symbolic value, usability, community mobility, and identity. These aspects should be considered in the wheelchair production, prescription, and adaptation processes.

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