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  • 1.
    Boiso, Samuel
    et al.
    Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping, Sweden.
    Dalin, Erik
    Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping, Sweden.
    Seidlitz, Heidi
    Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sidstedt, Maja
    Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping, Sweden / Applied Microbiology, Department of Chemistry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Trygg, Elias
    Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hedman, Johannes
    Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping, Sweden / Applied Microbiology, Department of Chemistry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ansell, Ricky
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping, Sweden.
    RapidHIT for the purpose of stain analyses – An interrupted implementation2017In: Forensic Science International: Genetics Supplement Series, ISSN 1875-1768, E-ISSN 1875-175X, Vol. 6, no Supplement C, p. e589-e590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid DNA instruments have in recent years been developed, enabling analysis of forensic samples with a minimum of human intervention. Initially intended for fast handling of reference samples, such as samples from suspects in booking suites, attention shifted to include crime scene samples. The aim of this study was to determine whether or not the RapidHIT System (IntegenX) is fit for crime scene samples. The first runs gave very poor results, which was found to be due to an incorrect firmware setting leading to no or just minute amounts of amplicons being injected for electrophoresis. After solving this problem, 28 full runs (seven samples each) applying NGM SElect Express were performed comprising various amounts of blood on cotton swabs. Six of the runs failed completely, four due to cartridge leakage and in two runs the PCR mix was not injected. For 155 samples with 1–5ÎŒL blood (volumes for which complete DNA profiles are expected), 119 samples (77%) gave complete DNA profiles. Among the most serious failures were incorrect allele calling and leakage of DNA extract or PCR product. Other general issues were failure to export results, anode motor breakdown and broken capillary array. Due to the encountered problems with software, hardware and cartridges, together with the low success rate, it was decided not to continue towards implementation of the RapidHIT System in casework.

  • 2.
    Foreberg, C.
    et al.
    Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wallmark, N.
    Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hedell, R.
    Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology and University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jansson, L.
    Applied Microbiology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ansell, Ricky
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hedman, J.
    Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping, Sweden; Applied Microbiology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Reference material for comparison of different adhesive tapes for forensic DNA sampling2015In: Forensic Science International: Genetics Supplement Series, ISSN 1875-1768, E-ISSN 1875-175X, Vol. 5, p. e454-e455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tape-lifting is an efficient method for collecting traces of cellular material from fabrics. Since 2006, an in-house adhesive tape has been used in casework at the Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping. Although this tape gives good DNA yields, we aim to replace it with a commercial tape to save cost and labour. In order to enable a fair comparison between different adhesive tapes, we have developed and evaluated a method for production of relevant reference material. One person, known to be a good shedder, wore identical long-sleeved T-shirts under controlled circumstances, and trace recovery was systematically performed with the in-house tape (3 T-shirts, total of 24 samples). Each sample was DNA extracted and quantified to find the normal variation within the reference material. The DNA recovery differed considerably between samples, with DNA concentrations between 0.010–0.48 ng/μL (mean: 0.083, SD: 0.12 ng/μL). Applying such a reference material for comparison between two commercial tapes and our in-house tape resulted in mean DNA recoveries plus/minus one standard deviation of 0.013 ± 0.006 ng/μL (Scenesafe FAST Box), 0.012 ± 0.007 ng/μL (Touch tape), and 0.023 ± 0.013 ng/μL (in-house tape). The in-house tape gave statistically significant higher yield compared to Touch tape (p  < 0.05), but for Scenesafe FAST Box the difference was not significant. The shedding of cells to clothes cannot be fully controlled. Having a systematically prepared, casework-like reference material with known variation is therefore vital for comparative studies of tapes

  • 3.
    Hedman, Johannes
    et al.
    Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping, Sweden; Applied Microbiology, Department of Chemistry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ågren, Joakim
    Swedish National Veterinary Institute, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ansell, Ricky
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping, Sweden.
    Crime scene DNA sampling by wet-vacuum applying M-VAC2015In: Forensic Science International: Genetics Supplement Series, ISSN 1875-1768, E-ISSN 1875-175X, Vol. 5, p. e89-e90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A possible alternative to conventional stain recovery by swabbing, taping or cutting, is the M-Vac wet-vacuum instrument (M-Vac Systems Inc.). We have evaluated M-Vac for sampling of dried saliva on porous and non-porous surfaces, shed cells on clothes and touch DNA. M-Vac gave significantly higher DNA yields for dried saliva stains on laminated wood, compared with cotton swabs (average DNA concentrations 1.14 vs. 0.57 ng/μL, p = 0.02). For stains on glass, M-Vac and cotton swabs gave comparable DNA yields. Additionally, M-Vac retrieved three times as much DNA from saliva stains on cotton fabric (T-shirt) compared with saliva on towels (terry cloth), showing that the absorption properties of the surface affect wet-vacuum sampling. M-Vac was also applied for retrieving wearer DNA from clothes, enabling generation of complete DNA profiles from denim jeans, leggings and cotton T-shirt. A mixed DNA profile was retrieved from an “aggressor” pressing a hand against the shoulder area of a worn T-shirt. Since the major component of the obtained mixed DNA profile was from the wearer, M-Vac may not be ideal for touch DNA sampling of clothes. Wet-vacuum sampling requires a fairly large instrument, trained users and DNA extraction procedures handling large sample volumes. The complexity of M-Vac sampling prevents it from being extensively used, but in specific and important cases it can be a valuable sampling tool.

  • 4.
    Kling, Daniel
    et al.
    Department of Forensic Services, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Tillmar, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kinship inference for males with identical Y-STR profiles using whole genome SNP data provides a deeper understanding about the level of coancestry in the Swedish male population2017In: Forensic Science International: Genetics Supplement Series, ISSN 1875-1768, E-ISSN 1875-175X, Vol. 6, p. e393-e394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Male individuals, from a Swedish reference population, with identical 17 loci Y-chromosomal STR haplotypes were analyzed with more than 900,000 autosomal SNPs in order to estimate their degree of genetic relatedness. This study shows that even though identical Y-STR profiles are shared, there is no evidence that these individuals are related to a higher degree compared with randomly unrelated male individuals in the Swedish population. Based on the results in this study, we conclude that the data do not show any signs of a biased sampling when it comes to the studied male individuals representing the Swedish reference population. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.

  • 5.
    Sanga, Malin
    et al.
    Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping, Sweden.
    Boiso, Lina
    Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lindsten, Harwati
    Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping, Sweden.
    Rådström, Peter
    Applied Microbiology, Department of Chemistry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ansell, Ricky
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hedman, Johannes
    Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping, Sweden; Applied Microbiology, Department of Chemistry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    A panel of PCR-inhibitory reference materials for quality evaluation of multiplex STR analysis kits2015In: Forensic Science International: Genetics Supplement Series, ISSN 1875-1768, E-ISSN 1875-175X, Vol. 5, p. e317-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PCR inhibition is a critical parameter in forensic DNA analysis. Substances interfering with amplification of short tandem repeats (STRs) may generate partial and/or ambiguous DNA profiles. We present a strategy for developing a broad panel of PCR-inhibitory reference materials (RMs), representing common casework samples. Our panel, including solutions prepared from for example cigarettes, chewing gum and soil, is a tool for in-house validation and lot testing of STR systems. PowerPlex ESX 16 Fast System tolerated high levels of some RMs, but several substances caused amplification problems. Humic acid had a negative effect on amelogenin, moist snuff hindered amplification of longer fragments, and chewing gum caused generally lowered allele peak heights. Applying a broad panel of RMs ensures that a wide range of inhibitory substances are tested, giving an improved understanding of inhibitor tolerance and effects.

  • 6.
    Sidstedt, M.
    et al.
    Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping, Sweden; Applied Microbiology, Department of Chemistry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Grandell, I.
    Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Linköping, Sweden.
    Boiso, S.
    Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sanga, Malin
    Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gréen, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hedman, J.
    Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping, Sweden; Applied Microbiology, Department of Chemistry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Tillmar, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Linköping, Sweden.
    Assessing the GeneRead SNP panel for analysis of low-template and PCR-inhibitory samples2017In: Forensic Science International: Genetics Supplement Series, ISSN 1875-1768, E-ISSN 1875-175X, Vol. 6, p. e267-e269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Massive parallel sequencing (MPS) is increasingly used for human identification purposes in forensic DNA laboratories. Forensic DNA samples are by nature heterogeneous and of varying quality, both concerning DNA integrity and matrices, creating a need for assays that can handle low amounts of DNA as well as impurities. Commercial short tandem repeat (STR) analysis kits for capillary electrophoresis-based separation have evolved drastically over the past years to handle low-template samples and high amounts of various PCR inhibitors. If MPS is to be used extensively in forensic laboratories there is a need to ascertain a similar performance. We have evaluated the GeneRead Individual Identity SNP panel (Qiagen) that includes 140 SNP markers, following the GeneRead DNAseq Targeted Panels V2 handbook for library preparation, applying low levels of DNA and relevant impurities. Analysis of down to 0.1 ng DNA generated SNP profiles with at least 85% called SNPs, after increasing the number of PCR cycles in the initial PCR from 20 to 24. The SNP assay handled extracts from four different DNA extraction methods, including Chelex with blood and saliva, without detrimental effects. Further, the assay was shown to tolerate relevant amounts of inhibitor solutions from soil, cigarettes, snuff and chewing gum. In conclusion, the performance of the SNP panel was satisfactory for casework-like samples. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.

1 - 6 of 6
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