liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bergfur, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Friberg, Nikolai
    Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, Silkeborg, Denmark.
    Trade-offs between fungal and bacterial respiration along gradients in temperature, nutrients and substrata: Experiments with stream derived microbial communities2012In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 46-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined the effects of temperature, nutrients and substrata on microbial respiration rates. Leaves of alder and oak were incubated in a natural stream. Leaf discs were incubated in antibiotics to manipulate the ratio of fungi to bacteria with three treatments: antifungal, antibacterial, and combined antifungal and antibacterial treatment in addition to controls. Discs were subsequently incubated in different nutrient set-ups and temperature regimes. Significant effects of temperature, nutrients, microbial treatment and leaf type on respiration rates were found. However, temperature did not significantly add to the effect of eutrophication on microbial respiration rates. A stronger effect of temperature on fungal mediated respiration than on bacterial mediated respiration was found. In streams where leaf litter constitutes the main energy source, fungi constitute the dominant microbial decomposer. Our results indicate that increased temperature due to global warming might have serious implications for ecosystem functioning when leaf litter constitutes the main energy source.

  • 2.
    Malacrinò, Antonino
    et al.
    University of Reggio Calabria, Italy; Universita of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.
    Schena, Leonardo
    University of Reggio Calabria, Italy.
    Campolo, Orlando
    University of Reggio Calabria, Italy.
    Laudani, Francesca
    University of Reggio Calabria, Italy.
    Palmeri, Vincenzo
    University of Reggio Calabria, Italy.
    Molecular analysis of the fungal microbiome associated with the olive fruit fly Bactrocera oleae2015In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 18, p. 67-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A molecular approach was used to investigate the fungal microbiome associated with Bactrocera oleae a major key pest of Olea europea, using the ITS2 region of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) as barcode gene. Amplicons were cloned and a representative number of sequenced fragments were used as barcode genes for the identification of fungi. The analysis of the detected sequence types (STs) enabled the identification of a total of 34 phylotypes which were associated with 10 fungal species, 3 species complexes and 8 genera. Three phylotypes remained unresolved within the order Saccharomycetales and the phylum Ascomycota because of the lack of closely related sequences in GenBank. Cladosporium was the most abundantly detected genus, followed by Alternaria and Aureobasidium, well-known components of olive sooty moulds. Interestingly, Colletotrichum sp. and other fungal plant pathogens were also detected, leading to potential new insights into heir epidemiology. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The British Mycological Society. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Malacrinó, Antonino
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Mediterranea Reggio Calabria, Italy.
    Rassati, Davide
    University of Padua, Italy.
    Schena, Leonardo
    University of Mediterranea Reggio Calabria, Italy.
    Mehzabin, Rupa
    University of Padua, Italy.
    Battisti, Andrea
    University of Padua, Italy.
    Palmeri, Vincenzo
    University of Mediterranea Reggio Calabria, Italy.
    Fungal communities associated with bark and ambrosia beetles trapped at international harbours2017In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 28, p. 44-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bark and ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera; Scolytinae) establish trophic relationships with fungi, which could be also agents of plant diseases. Orthotomicus erosus (Wollaston) and Xyleborinus saxesenii (Ratzeburg) are two species of Palaearctic origin that have been introduced in several countries around the world. Here, we investigated their associated fungal communities using individuals trapped at harbours in their native range, without strictly focusing on nutritional symbionts. Targeting the ITS2 region of the fungal rDNA through pyrosequencing, we retrieved taxa known to be agents of plant diseases, taxa never previously reported associated with these beetle species, and sequence clusters not linked to any known fungus. These findings underline that surveillance at harbours should be extended to the fungi associated with trapped bark and ambrosia beetles, taking into account their role as potential vectors of plant pathogens. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd and British Mycological Society. All rights reserved.

1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf