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  • 1.
    Byström, IngMarie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hollén, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Johansson, AnnaKarin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Health-Related Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents with Celiac Disease: From the Perspectives of Children and Parents2012In: Gastroenterology Research and Practice, ISSN 1687-6121, E-ISSN 1687-630X, Vol. 2012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To examine how celiac children and adolescents on gluten-free diet valued their health-related quality of life, and if age and severity of the disease at onset affected the childrens self-valuation later in life. We also assessed the parents valuation of their childs quality of life. Methods. The DISABKIDS Chronic generic measure, short versions for both children and parents, was used on 160 families with celiac disease. A paediatric gastroenterologist classified manifestations of the disease at onset retrospectively. Results. Age or sex did not influence the outcome. Children diagnosed before the age of five scored higher than children diagnosed later. Children diagnosed more than eight years ago scored higher than more recently diagnosed children, and children who had the classical symptoms of the disease at onset scored higher than those who had atypical symptoms or were asymptomatic. The parents valuated their childrens quality of life as lower than the children did. Conclusion. Health-related quality of life in treated celiac children and adolescents was influenced by age at diagnosis, disease severity at onset, and years on gluten-free diet. The disagreement between child-parent valuations highlights the importance of letting the children themselves be heard about their perceived quality of life.

  • 2.
    Redéen, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Petersson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Forensic Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Törnkrantz, E.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery.
    Levander, H.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery.
    Mårdh, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Borch, Kurt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Reliability of diagnostic tests for Helicobacter pylori infection2011In: Gastroenterology Research and Practice, ISSN 1687-6121, E-ISSN 1687-630X, Vol. 2011, no 940650Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection is very common worldwide. A reliable diagnosis is crucial for patients with H.pylori related diseases. At follow-up it is important to confirm that eradication therapy has been successful. There is no established gold standard for the diagnosis of H.pylori infection.

    Material and Methods: A sample of 304 volunteers from the general population was screened for H.pylori infection with serology, 13C-urea breath test (UBT), rapid urease test (RUT) on fresh biopsy, culture from biopsy and histological examination. Each method was tested against the other methods (except serology) taken together as gold standard.

    Result: The sensitivity was 0.99 for serology 0.92 for UBT, 0.96 for RUT, 0.99 for culture and 0.95 for histological examination. Corresponding specificities were 0.82, 0.94, 0.93, 0.90 and 0.92, respectively. The accuracy was 0.86 for serology, 0.94 for UBT, 0.94 for RUT, 0.93 for culture and 0.93 for histology. There was a strong correlation between the results of UBT and histological scores for H.pylori colonization as well as between the results of UBT and the scores of RUT.

    Conclusion: There were only minor differences in accuracy between three invasive tests for H.pylori infection in this population. RUT may be recommended as first choice since a result is obtained within hours. The accuracy of UBT was comparable to the invasive tests and it is recommended for situations when endoscopy is not needed.

  • 3.
    Strand, A. Horna
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Franzen, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Influence of Life Style Factors on Barretts Oesophagus2014In: Gastroenterology Research and Practice, ISSN 1687-6121, E-ISSN 1687-630X, Vol. 2014, no 408470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Since the incidence of adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus is rising, the prognosis is poor, and surveillance programs are expensive and mostly cost ineffective, there is a need to increase the knowledge of risk factors in Barretts oesophagus and oesophageal cancer in order to be able to give attention to medical prevention and/or surveillance programs. Aim. To study if there is a correlation between the development of Barretts oesophagus and GOR (gastro oesophageal reflux), family history of GOR, and life style factors, such as alcohol, smoking habits, and mental stress. Methods. Fifty-five consecutively selected patients with Barretts oesophagus (BO) examined at Linkoping University Hospitals Oesophageal Laboratory were matched by sex, age, and duration of reflux symptoms with 55 GOR patients without Barretts oesophagus at the Oesophageal Laboratory. The medical charts in respective groups were examined for comparison of life style factors, mental stress, medication, duration of gastroesophageal acid reflux at 24 hr-pH-metry, and incidence of antireflux surgery and of adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus (ACO). Also, potential gender differences and diagnosis of ACO were studied. Results. Mean percentage reflux time on 24 hr-pH-metry was higher for the Barretts oesophagus group, 18% for women and 17% for men compared to 4% for women and 4% for men in the control group (P less than 0.05). Family history of GOR was more frequent in Barretts oesophagus patients (62%) than in the control group (35%) (P less than 0.05). Male patients with Barretts oesophagus had medical therapy for their GOR symptoms to a higher extent (38%) than male controls (65%) (P less than 0.05). No difference was found in the number of tobacco users or former tobacco users between Barretts oesophagus patients and controls. Barretts oesophagus patients had the same level of alcohol consumption and the same average BMI as the control subjects. Female patients with Barretts oesophagus rated themselves as more mentally stressed (67%) than the female controls (38%) (P less than 0.05). In the five-year medical chart follow-up, five of 55 patients developed adenocarcinoma among the Barretts oesophagus patients, none in the control group. Conclusions. Long reflux time and family clustering of GOR seem to influence the development of Barretts oesophagus. Smoking habits, alcohol consumption and BMI do not seem to have any impact on the development of Barretts oesophagus.

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