liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Borutinskaite, Veronika V
    et al.
    Vilnius State University, Lithuania .
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Navakauskiene, Ruta
    Vilnius State University, Lithuania .
    Histone deacetylase inhibitor BML-210 induces growth inhibition and apoptosis and regulates HDAC and DAPC complex expression levels in cervical cancer cells2012In: Molecular Biology Reports, ISSN 0301-4851, E-ISSN 1573-4978, Vol. 39, no 12, p. 10179-10186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) represent a new class of targeted anti-cancer agents and different other diseases, like muscular disorders. A number of studies have shown that extracellular signal-activated kinases can target chromatin-modifying complexes directly and regulate their function. The molecular connection between the dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC) and chromatin has been described, by showing that NO signaling regulates histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and influences gene expression in different cell types. In present study, we investigated HDACs changes in HeLa cells undergoing growth inhibition and apoptosis, caused by HDACI BML-210 and retinoic acid (ATRA). Cell cycle analysis indicated that HeLa cell treatment with 20 and 30 mu M concentration of BML-210 increased the proportion of cells in G0/G1 phase, and caused accumulation in subG1, indicating that the cells are undergoing apoptosis. We determined down-regulation of HDAC 1-5 and 7 after treatment with BML-210. Also, we demonstrated expression of different isoforms of alpha-dystrobrevin (alpha-DB) and other components of DAPC such as syntrophin, dystrophin, beta-dystrobrevin (beta-DB) and NOS in HeLa cells after treatments. We determined changes in protein expression level of dystrophin, NOS1, alpha- and beta-DB and in subcellular localization of alpha-DB after treatments with BML-210 and ATRA. In conclusion, these results suggest that HDACI BML-210 can inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis in cervical cancer cells, what correlates with down-regulation of HDAC class I and II and changes in the DAPC expression levels. This can be important for identifying target proteins in DAPC signaling to HDACs, as a target of pharmacological intervention for treatment of muscular dystrophies and other diseases.

  • 2. Dannaeus, Karin
    et al.
    Bessonova, Marina
    Jönsson, Jan-Ingvar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of cell biology.
    Characterization of the mouse myeloid-associated differentiation marker (myadm) gene: Promoter analysis and protein localization2005In: Molecular Biology Reports, ISSN 0301-4851, E-ISSN 1573-4978, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 149-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hematopoietic differentiation is a complex process involving many genes inducing functional changes and characteristics of different cell lineages. To understand this process, it is important to identify genes involved in lineage commitment and maturation of hematopoietic progenitor cells. Recently we isolated the novel gene MYADM which is strongly up-regulated as multipotent progenitor cells differentiate towards myeloid cells. Because it is not expressed in lymphocytes, understanding the transcriptional control of MYADM could further explain differences in gene expression between myeloid and lymphoid cells. To identify regulatory elements controlling its restricted expression, we have analyzed the 5′-flanking region of the MYADM gene. The proximal promoter was found to lack both TATA and CCAAT boxes, but contained several potential binding sites for both ubiquitous and myeloid-specific transcription factors. Maximal promoter activity was contained within 800∈bp from the tentative transcription initiation site, which was reduced as portions of the 5′-end were deleted, and completely abolished when the transcription initiation site was deleted. This promoter sequence had higher activity in myeloid cells compared to B cells, and activity was enhanced during myeloid differentiation, suggesting that we have identified the MYADM core promoter. Computer predictions had suggested MYADM to encode a protein with multiple transmembrane domains. By immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy we demonstrate that the protein is localized to the nuclear envelope and to intracytoplasmic membranes, indicating that MYADM constitutes an integral membrane protein. © Springer 2005.

  • 3.
    Zhou, Bin
    et al.
    Sichuan University.
    Yan, Hui
    Sichuan University.
    Li, Yuan
    Sichuan University.
    Wang, Rong
    Sichuan University.
    Chen, Keling
    Sichuan University.
    Zhou, Zongguang
    Sichuan University.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    PNAS-4 expression and its relationship to p53 in colorectal cancer2012In: Molecular Biology Reports, ISSN 0301-4851, E-ISSN 1573-4978, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 243-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PNAS-4 is a novel pro-apoptotic protein activated during the early response to DNA damage; however, the molecular mechanisms and pathways regulating PNAS-4 expression in tumors are not well understood. We hypothesized that PNAS-4 is a p53 down-stream target gene and designed this study. We searched online for putative p53-binding sites in the entire PNAS-4 gene and did not find any corresponding information. In HCT116 colon cancer cells, after being transfected with small interfering RNA to silence p53, the expressions of PNAS-4 and other known p53 target gene (Apaf1, Bax, Fas and Dr5) were determined by real-time PCR. We found that PNAS-4 was up-regulated while Apaf1, Bax, Fas and Dr5 were down-regulated. We then examined the expression of PNAS-4 and p53 mutation in colorectal cancer patients. PNAS-4 expressed both in colorectal cancers and normal tissues, but compared with paired control, PNAS-4 was up-regulated in cancers (P = 0.018). PNAS-4 overexpression ratios were correlated to the p53 mutant status (P = 0.001). The mean PNAS-4 expression levels of p53 mutant homozygote group and heterozygote group were higher than that of p53 wild type group (P = 0.013). The expression ratios of PNAS-4 (every sample in relative to its paired normal mucosa) were different between negative lymph node metastasis (66% up-regulated, 34% down-regulated) and positive metastasis (42% up-regulated, 58% down-regulated). Taken together, these findings suggested that PNAS-4 was not a p53 target, but overexpression of PNAS-4 was correlated to p53 inactivity in colorectal cancer.

1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf