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  • 1.
    Berg, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Postoperative recovery after different orthopedic day surgical procedures2011In: International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing, ISSN 1878-1241, E-ISSN 1878-1292, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 165-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Orthopedic day surgery is common. Postoperative recovery may differ according to surgical procedures and personal factors. We studied postoperative recovery up to 2 weeks after different orthopedic day surgical procedures and tried to identify possible predictors associated with recovery. Three-hundred and fifty eight patients who had undergone knee arthroscopy or surgery to the hand/arm, foot/leg or shoulder were included. Data were collected on postoperative days 1, 7 and 14 using the Swedish Post-discharge Surgery Recovery scale, the emotional state, physical comfort and physical independence dimensions in the Quality of Recovery-23 and a general health question. Multiple linear regression was used to explore predictors of recovery. The shoulder patients experienced significantly lower postoperative recovery and general health 1 and 2 weeks after surgery compared to the other patient groups (p < 0.001). Significant predictors of recovery were age, perceived health and emotional status on the first postoperative day and type of surgery. Postoperative recovery after common orthopedic day surgical procedures varies and factors influencing it need to be further explored. The impact of a patient’s emotional state on recovery after day surgery can be of particular interest in this work. Post-discharge planning needs to be tailored to the surgical procedure.

  • 2.
    Johansson Stark, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Salanterä, Sanna
    University of Turku, Department of Nursing Science, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Sigurdardottir, Arun K
    School of Health Sciences, University of Akureyri, Iceland .
    Valkeapää, Kirsi
    University of Turku, Department of nursing Science, Turku, Finland and Dean Lahti University of Applied Sciences, Lahti Finland.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Spouse-related factors associated with Quality of Recovery of patients after hip or knee replacement: a Nordic perspective2016In: International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing, ISSN 1878-1241, E-ISSN 1878-1292, Vol. 23, p. 32-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Today’s shorter hospital stays means that patients may need support from informal caregivers during their recovery period. The responsibility for providing this support shifts from the health care staff to their family members fairly early in the recovery process. Spousal caregivers are considered to be primary caregivers as their relationship with the patient is more interdependent than other family members or caregivers.

    Objectives: The aim was to describe spouse-related factors that were associated with patients’ quality of recovery on discharge from hospital after elective hip or knee replacement.

    Design: The design was prospective, descriptive and comparative with two measurements; before arthroplasty and on discharge.

    Settings: Two Finnish, three Icelandic and two Swedish university or community hospitals.

    Participants: The sample consisted of spouses and patients. The inclusion criteria were: age ≥ 18 years, able to complete the questionnaires, and able to understand Finnish/Icelandic/Swedish. The patients were asked to identify one family member. Spouses were those defining themselves as; wife, husband or cohabiting partner. Out of 463 spouses, 306 (66%) were included. The mean age of the included spouses was 64 years, and 54% of them were females.

    Methods: Self-reported instruments on; expected and received knowledge, access to knowledge, emotional state and quality of recovery were used.

    Results: If the spouses were or had been employed in the social services or healthcare their partner had greater quality of recovery (p=0.006). Spouses experiencing negative emotions had partners who experienced lower quality of recovery (p<0.001). Spouses who experienced that nurses had enough time and explained matters concerning their family members’ care and treatment had partners who experienced greater quality of recovery (p=0.011, 0.044).

    Conclusions: Spouses’ emotional state played an important role in the patients’ quality of recovery, with uncertainty and depressive state as the main predictors. The importance of nurses explaining matters sufficiently to spouses was emphasized, while spouses’ fulfilment of knowledge expectations was not associated with patients’ recovery.

  • 3.
    Malmgren, Malin
    et al.
    Hospital of Halland, Varberg, Sweden.
    Törnvall, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Jansson, Inger
    School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Patients with hip fracture: Experiences of participation in care2014In: International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing, ISSN 1878-1241, E-ISSN 1878-1292, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 143-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health care staff are obliged to help patients participate in their care. Previous research has shown that information and relationships with staff are important factors for patients to feel involved. The aim of the study was to describe patients’ experiences of participation during hospitalization for hip fracture. Eleven patients being treated for hip fracture were included and data were collected using interviews. Analysis of the data was carried out through qualitative content analysis. The results illustrate that the experiences of participation are governed by the patient’s personal circumstances, needs and wishes and are affected by how responsive the staff are to these. Patients’ experience of participation is also affected by having to adapt to the health care organization and structure. To pursue individualized care, staff need to start from patient preferences and it is a challenge to adapt care to both the individual and the organization. By paying attention to patient preferences, the staff have a greater opportunity to implement changes in health care that will benefit a large patient population. This can lead to patients gaining better functional capacity and quality of life.

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