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  • 1.
    Haake, Magnus
    et al.
    Cognitive Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hansson, Kristina
    Department of Logopedics, Phoniatrics & Audiology, Clinical Sciences Lund.
    Gulz, Agneta
    Cognitive Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Schötz, Susanne
    Department of Linguistics, Centre for Languages and Literature, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Department of Logopedics, Phoniatrics & Audiology, Clinical Sciences Lund.
    The slower the better: Does the speaker' speech rate influence children' performance on a language comprehension test?2013In: International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, ISSN 1754-9507, E-ISSN 1754-9515, Vol. 16, no 2, 181-190 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of speech rate on children' performance on a widely used language comprehension test, the Test for Reception of Grammar, version 2 (TROG 2), and to explore how test performance interacts with task difficulty and with the child' working memory capacity. Participants were 102 typically developing Swedish-speaking children randomly assigned to one of the three conditions; the TROG 2 sentences spoken by a speech-language pathologist with slow, normal or fast speech rate. Results showed that the fast speech rate had a negative effect on the TROG 2 scores and that slow rate was more beneficial in general. However, for more difficult tasks the beneficial effect of slow speech was only pronounced for children with better scores on a working memory task. Our interpretation is that slow speech is particularly helpful when children do not yet fully master a task but are just about to grasp it. Our results emphasise the necessity of careful considerations of the role dynamic aspects of examiner' speech might play in test administration and favour digitalised procedures in standardised language comprehension assessment.

  • 2.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Collaboration, trouble and repair in multiparty interactions involving couples with dementia or aphasia2017In: International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, ISSN 1754-9507, E-ISSN 1754-9515, Vol. 19, no 5, 454-464 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to identify problems with communication with persons with aphasia and persons with dementia in a collaborative interview setting with their significant others. In particular, to compare interactional practices used in order to resolve problems caused by specific symptoms. Method: Five persons with aphasia and five persons with dementia and their spouses participated in the study. Interviews were carried out couple by couple, and the interviews had a task-oriented character. The interviews were video and audio recorded. All interviews were transcribed. From the transcriptions categorisations according to previous literature were made. Result: The results demonstrated that repair sequences were frequent in interaction involving people with aphasia (PWA), and even more so in interaction involving persons with dementia (PWD). In general, it was the PWA/PWD that initiated the repair sequence more often than the spouse, thus keeping the general rule of a preference for self-initiated repair compared to other-initiated repair. Conclusion: The active involvement of the conversational partners in trouble solving sequences in interaction with PWA/PWD demonstrated in the present study indicates that the interactional style of the conversational partner to PWA/PWD important. This implies that conversation partner training programmes would be useful both for PWA and for PWD.

  • 3.
    Tukel, Sermin
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bjorelius, Helena
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Henningsson, Gunilla
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Mcallister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Christin Eliasson, Ann
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Motor functions and adaptive behaviour in children with childhood apraxia of speech2015In: International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, ISSN 1754-9507, E-ISSN 1754-9515, Vol. 17, no 5, 470-480 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Undiagnosed motor and behavioural problems have been reported for children with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). This study aims to understand the extent of these problems by determining the profile of and relationships between speech/non-speech oral, manual and overall body motor functions and adaptive behaviours in CAS. Method: Eighteen children (five girls and 13 boys) with CAS, 4 years 4 months to 10 years 6 months old, participated in this study. The assessments used were the Verbal Motor Production Assessment for Children (VMPAC), Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (BOT-2) and Adaptive Behaviour Assessment System (ABAS-II). Result: Median result of speech/non-speech oral motor function was between -1 and -2 SD of the mean VMPAC norms. For BOT-2 and ABAS-II, the median result was between the mean and -1 SD of test norms. However, on an individual level, many children had co-occurring difficulties (below -1 SD of the mean) in overall and manual motor functions and in adaptive behaviour, despite few correlations between sub-tests. Conclusion: In addition to the impaired speech motor output, children displayed heterogeneous motor problems suggesting the presence of a global motor deficit. The complex relationship between motor functions and behaviour may partly explain the undiagnosed developmental difficulties in CAS.

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