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  • 1.
    Haglund, Jesper
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Andersson, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Primary school childrens´s ideas of mixing and heat as expressed in a classroom setting2014In: Journal of Baltic Science Education, ISSN 1648-3898, E-ISSN 2538-7138, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 726-739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates primary school children’s (7-8 year-old, N = 25) ideas of mixing of marbles and of heat, expressed in small-group predict-observe-explain exercises, and drawings representing the children’s own analogies in a classroom setting. The children were typically found to predict that marbles of two different colours would mix when rocked back and forth on a board. This idea of mixing is slightly more advanced than previously reported in the literature. The children’s ideas of heat included reference to warm objects, their own bodies when exercising, and the process of one warm solid object heating another object in direct contact. In addition, through scaffolding, some of the children expressed a substance view of heat. Finally, the potential and challenges in probing children’s ideas through a combination of data collection techniques in a classroom setting are reflected upon

  • 2.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science.
    Haglund, Jesper
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science.
    Strömdahl, Helge
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Exploiting languages in teaching of entropy2011In: Journal of Baltic Science Education, ISSN 1648-3898, E-ISSN 2538-7138, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 27-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The words disorder, information, freedom and spreading are used as metaphors and analogies in science teaching to capture the scientific qualitative sense of entropy. In addition, the identification of entropy with the everyday conception of heat has been proposed. While physical sciences are regarded as exact disciplines, in which terms have precise definitions, the words being used in the qualitative interpretation of entropy have many senses. This may provide an obstacle to achieving a scientific understanding of entropy. In this study, the metaphors for entropy and seeing entropy as heat were analysed by use of the different entries for the words in a dictionary. The present paper is a contribution to highlighting the importance of making any metaphors and analogies and their benefits and limitations explicit.

  • 3.
    Löfgren, Ragnhild
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Schoultz, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Hultman, Glenn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Björklund, Lars-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Exploratory talk in science education: Inquiry-based learning and communicative approach in primary school2013In: Journal of Baltic Science Education, ISSN 1648-3898, E-ISSN 2538-7138, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 482-496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research on science education has increasingly focused on the role of exploratory talk for learning science in school. This study was conducted in third grade in the Swedish compulsory school and shows how difficult exploratory talk in science is to achieve. The recordings of each lesson focused mainly on the teacher but included the pupils as the teacher interacted with them. The empirical material was analysed from two different perspectives: ways of communicating the science content and communicative approach. The analysis of the classroom practice showed that scientific descriptions were dominating ways of communication. Only in a few cases explanations of scientific phenomena were in focus. Those situations caused turning points into more interactive/dialogic communications or exploratory talk. One main conclusion is that exploratory talk and scientific explanations are not easily achieved when working in primary school. These skills are not automatically attained by the use of inquiry-based material - it needs to be trained!

  • 4.
    Schönborn, Konrad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Haglund, Jesper
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Xie, Charles
    Concord Consortium, Concord, MA, USA.
    Pupils' early explorations of thermoimaging to interpret heat and temperature2014In: Journal of Baltic Science Education, ISSN 1648-3898, E-ISSN 2538-7138, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 118-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In thermodynamics teaching, pupils have been found to confuse temperature and heat, and to conceive touch as an infallible thermometer. This study explored the potential of combining the sense of touch with infrared (IR) thermal imaging on pupils’ understanding of heat and temperature. Eight 7th-grade pupils (12-13 years old) worked in pairs across three laboratory exercises (real-time IR imaging, static IR images, or thermometers) to predict, observe and explain (POE) the temperatures of different objects. An anomaly between perceived ‘coldness’ and measured temperature was induced among the pupils, but they did not manage to resolve this cognitive conflict. The pupils observed the objects getting warmer and increasing in temperature, but did not explain the experiments as involving a heat flow from their bodies to the objects. Successful explanation might require a combination of thermal imaging and the explicit introduction of a simple heat-flow model.

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