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  • 1.
    Ali, Neserin
    et al.
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Karin
    Center for Molecular Protein Science, Biochemistry and Structural Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rissler, Jenny
    Department of Design Sciences, Ergonomic and Aerosol Technology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Helen Marg
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Svensson, Christian R
    Department of Design Sciences, Ergonomic and Aerosol Technology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gudmundsson, Anders
    Department of Design Sciences, Ergonomic and Aerosol Technology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Lindh, Christian H
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Bo A G
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Cedervall, Tommy
    Center for Molecular Protein Science, Biochemistry and Structural Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Kåredal, Monica
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Analysis of nanoparticle-protein coronas formed in vitro between nanosized welding particles and nasal lavage proteins.2016In: Nanotoxicology, ISSN 1743-5390, E-ISSN 1743-5404, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 226-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Welding fumes include agglomerated particles built up of primary nanoparticles. Particles inhaled through the nose will to some extent be deposited in the protein-rich nasal mucosa, and a protein corona will be formed around the particles. The aim was to identify the protein corona formed between nasal lavage proteins and four types of particles with different parameters. Two of the particles were formed and collected during welding and two were manufactured iron oxides. When nasal lavage proteins were added to the particles, differences were observed in the sizes of the aggregates that were formed. Measurements showed that the amount of protein bound to particles correlated with the relative size increase of the aggregates, suggesting that the surface area was associated with the binding capacity. However, differences in aggregate sizes were detected when nasal proteins were added to UFWF and Fe2O3 particles (having similar agglomerated size) suggesting that yet parameters other than size determine the binding. Relative quantitative mass spectrometric and gel-based analyses showed differences in the protein content of the coronas. High-affinity proteins were further assessed for network interactions. Additional experiments showed that the inhibitory function of secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor, a highly abundant nasal protein, was influenced by particle binding suggesting that an understanding of protein function following particle binding is necessary to properly evaluate pathophysiological events. Our results underscore the importance of including particles collected from real working environments when studying the toxic effects of particles because these effects might be mediated by the protein corona.

  • 2.
    Bayat, Narges
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Rajapakse, Katarina
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia .
    Marinsek-Logar, Romana
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia .
    Drobne, Damjana
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia Centre Excellence Adv Mat and Technology Future CONAMASTE, Slovenia Centre Excellence Nanosci and Nanotechnol CO Nanoctr, Slovenia .
    Cristobal, Susana
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The effects of engineered nanoparticles on the cellular structure and growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae2014In: Nanotoxicology, ISSN 1743-5390, E-ISSN 1743-5404, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 363-373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to study the effects of nanoparticles (NPs) with different physicochemical properties on cellular viability and structure, Saccharomyces cerevisiae were exposed to different concentrations of TiO2-NPs (1-3 nm), ZnO-NPs (less than100 nm), CuO-NPs (less than50 nm), their bulk forms, Ag-NPs (10 nm) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The GreenScreen assay was used to measure cyto- and genotoxicity, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) used to assess ultrastructure. Cu-ONPs were highly cytotoxic, reducing the cell density by 80% at 9 cm(2)/ml, and inducing lipid droplet formation. Cells exposed to Ag-NPs (19 cm(2)/ml) and TiO2-NPs (147 cm(2)/ml) contained dark deposits in intracellular vacuoles, the cell wall and vesicles, and reduced cell density (40 and 30%, respectively). ZnO-NPs (8 cm(2)/ml) caused an increase in the size of intracellular vacuoles, despite not being cytotoxic. SWCNTs did not cause cytotoxicity or significant alterations in ultrastructure, despite high oxidative potential. Two genotoxicity assays, GreenScreen and the comet assay, produced different results and the authors discuss the reasons for this discrepancy. Classical assays of toxicity may not be the most suitable for studying the effects of NPs in cellular systems, and the simultaneous assessment of other measures of the state of cells, such as TEM are highly recommended.

  • 3.
    Rajapakse, K.
    et al.
    University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Drobne, D.
    University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Kastelec, D.
    University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Kogej, K.
    University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Makovec, D.
    Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Gallampois, Christine
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Amelina, H.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Danielsson, G.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fanedl, L.
    University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Marinsek-Logar, R.
    University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Cristobal, Susana
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, University of the Basque Country, Leioa, Spain.
    Proteomic analyses of early response of unicellular eukaryotic microorganism Tetrahymena thermophila exposed to TiO2 particles.2016In: Nanotoxicology, ISSN 1743-5390, E-ISSN 1743-5404, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 542-556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Key biological functions involved in cell survival have been studied to understand the difference between the impact of exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) and their bulk counterparts (bulk-TiO2). By selecting a unicellular eukaryotic model organism and applying proteomic analysis an overview of the possible impact of exposure could be obtained. In this study, we investigated the early response of unicellular eukaryotic protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila exposed to TiO2-NPs or bulk-TiO2 particles at subtoxic concentrations for this organism. The proteomic analysis based on 2DE + nLC-ESI-MS/MS revealed 930 distinct protein spots, among which 77 were differentially expressed and 18 were unambiguously identified. We identified alterations in metabolic pathways, including lipid and fatty acid metabolism, purine metabolism and energetic metabolism, as well as salt stress and protein degradation. This proteomic study is consistent with our previous findings, where the early response of T. thermophila to subtoxic concentrations of TiO2 particles included alterations in lipid and fatty acid metabolism and ion regulation. The response to the lowest TiO2-NPs concentration differed significantly from the response to higher TiO2-NPs concentration and both bulk-TiO2concentrations. Alterations on the physiological landscape were significant after exposure to both nano- and bulk-TiO2; however, no toxic effects were evidenced even at very high exposure concentrations. This study confirms the relevance of the alteration of the lipid profile and lipid metabolism in understanding the early impact of TiO2-NPs in eukaryotic cells, for example, phagocytosing cells like macrophages and ciliated cells in the respiratory epithelium.

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