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  • 1.
    Brown, Sally
    et al.
    University of Southampton, UK.
    Nicholls, Robert J.
    University of Southampton, UK.
    Hanson, Susan
    University of Southampton, UK.
    Brundrit, Geoff
    University of Cape Town, South Africa.
    Dearing, John A.
    University of Southampton, UK.
    Dickson, Mark E.
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Gallop, Shari L.
    University of Southampton, UK.
    Gao, Shu
    Nanjing University, China.
    Haigh, Ivan D.
    University of Southampton, UK.
    Hinkel, Jochen
    Global Climate Forum eV, Berlin, Germany.
    Jimenez, Jose A.
    University of Politecn Cataluna, Spain.
    Klein, Richard
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Stockholm Environm Institute, Sweden.
    Kron, Wolfgang
    Munich Reinsurance Company, Germany.
    Lazar, Attila N.
    University of Southampton, UK.
    Freitas Neves, Claudio
    Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    Newton, Alice
    University of Algarve, Portugal; Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Kjeller, Norway; NILU-IMPEC, Kjeller, Norway.
    Pattiaratachi, Charitha
    University of Western Australia.
    Payo, Andres
    University of Oxford, UK.
    Pye, Kenneth
    University of Southampton, UK.
    Sanchez-Arcilla, Agustin
    University of Politecn Cataluna, Spain.
    Siddall, Mark
    University of Bristol, UK.
    Shareef, Ali
    Ministry of Environment and Energy, Maldives.
    Tompkins, Emma L.
    University of Southampton, UK.
    Vafeidis, Athanasios T.
    University of Kiel, Germany.
    van Maanen, Barend
    University of Southampton, UK.
    Ward, Philip J.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Woodroffe, Colin D.
    University of Wollongong, Australia.
    Shifting perspectives on coastal impacts and adaptation2014In: Nature Climate Change, ISSN 1758-678X, E-ISSN 1758-6798, Vol. 4, no 9, p. 752-755Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports reflect evolving attitudes in adapting to sea-level rise by taking a systems approach and recognizing that multiple responses exist to achieve a less hazardous coast.

  • 2.
    Carlsen, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm Environm Institute, Sweden.
    Klein, Richard
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Stockholm Environm Institute, Germany.
    Wikman-Svahn, Per
    Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Letter: Transparent scenario development in NATURE CLIMATE CHANGE, vol 7, issue 9, pp 613-6132017In: Nature Climate Change, ISSN 1758-678X, E-ISSN 1758-6798, Vol. 7, no 9, p. 613-613Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 3.
    Dow, Kirstin
    et al.
    University of South Carolina, Columbia, USA.
    Berkhout, Frans
    Institute for Environmental Studies, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Preston, Benjamin L.
    Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, USA.
    Klein, Richard J. T.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Stockholm Environment Institute, Sweden.
    Midgley, Guy
    South African National Biodiversity Institute, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Shaw, M. Rebecca
    University of Kwazulu Natal, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa.
    COMMENTARY: Limits to adaptation2013In: Nature Climate Change, ISSN 1758-678X, E-ISSN 1758-6798, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 305-307Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An actor-centered, risk-based approach to defining limits to social adaptation provides a useful analytic framing for identifying and anticipating these limits and informing debates over society's responses to climate change.

  • 4.
    Eisenack, Klaus
    et al.
    Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Germany.
    Moser, Susanne C.
    Susanne Moser Research and Consulting, CA 95060 USA.
    Hoffmann, Esther
    Institute Ecol Econ Research, Germany.
    Klein, Richard
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Stockholm Environment Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Oberlack, Christoph
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Pechan, Anna
    Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Germany.
    Rotter, Maja
    Deutsch Gesell Int Zusammenarbeit GIZ, Germany.
    Termeer, Catrien J. A. M.
    Wageningen University, Netherlands.
    Explaining and overcoming barriers to climate change adaptation2014In: Nature Climate Change, ISSN 1758-678X, E-ISSN 1758-6798, Vol. 4, no 10, p. 867-872Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of barriers is increasingly used to describe the obstacles that hinder the planning and implementation of climate change adaptation. The growing literature on barriers to adaptation reveals not only commonly reported barriers, but also conflicting evidence, and few explanations of why barriers exist and change. There is thus a need for research that focuses on the interdependencies between barriers and considers the dynamic ways in which barriers develop and persist. Such research, which would be actor-centred and comparative, would help to explain barriers to adaptation and provide insights into how to overcome them.

  • 5.
    Eisenack, Klaus
    et al.
    Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Germany.
    Moser, Susanne C.
    Susanne Moser Research and Consulting, CA 95060 USA.
    Hoffmann, Esther
    Institute Ecol Econ Research, Germany.
    Klein, Richard
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Stockholm Environm Institute, Sweden.
    Oberlack, Christoph
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Pechan, Anna
    Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Germany.
    Rotter, Maja
    Deutsch Gesell Int Zusammenarbeit GIZ, Ghana.
    Termeer, Catrien J. A. M.
    Wageningen University, Netherlands.
    Letter: Reply to Opening up the black box of adaptation decision-making in NATURE CLIMATE CHANGE, vol 5, issue 6, pp 494-4952015In: Nature Climate Change, ISSN 1758-678X, E-ISSN 1758-6798, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 494-495Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 6.
    Gålfalk, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bastviken, David
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Making methane visible2016In: Nature Climate Change, ISSN 1758-678X, E-ISSN 1758-6798, Vol. 6, p. 426-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methane (CH4) is one of the most important greenhouse gases, and an important energy carrier in biogas and natural gas. Its large-scale emission patterns have been unpredictable and the source and sink distributions are poorly constrained. Remote assessment of CH4 with high sensitivity at a m2 spatial resolution would allow detailed mapping of the near-ground distribution and anthropogenic sources in landscapes but has hitherto not been possible. Here we show that CH4gradients can be imaged on the <m2 scale at ambient levels (~1.8 ppm) and filmed using optimized infrared (IR) hyperspectral imaging. Our approach allows both spectroscopic confirmation and quantification for all pixels in an imaged scene simultaneously. It also has the ability to map fluxes for dynamic scenes. This approach to mapping boundary layer CH4 offers a unique potential way to improve knowledge about greenhouse gases in landscapes and a step towards resolving source–sink attribution and scaling issues.

  • 7.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Nasiritousi, Naghmeh
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Views on alternative forums for effectively tackling climate change2015In: Nature Climate Change, ISSN 1758-678X, E-ISSN 1758-6798, Vol. 5, no 9, p. 864-867Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This year (2015) marks the 21st formal anniversary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and in December a new climate treaty is expected to be reached. Yet, the UNFCCC has not been successful in setting the world on a path to meet a target to prevent temperatures rising by more than 2 degrees C above pre-industrial levels(1). Meanwhile, other forums, such as the G20 and subnational forums, have increasingly become sites of climate change initiatives(2-6). There has, however, so far been no systematic evaluation of what forums climate change policymakers and practitioners perceive to be needed to effectively tackle climate change. Drawing on survey data from two recent UNFCCC Conference of the Parties (COP), we show that there exists an overall preference for state-led, multilateral forums. However, preferences starkly diverge between respondents from different geographical regions and no clear alternative to the UNFCCC emerges. Our results highlight difficulties in coordinating global climate policy in a highly fragmented governance landscape.

  • 8.
    Marotta, H.
    et al.
    University of Federal Fluminense, Brazil University of Federal Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    Pinho, L.
    University of Federal Rio de Janeiro, Brazil .
    Gudasz, C.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Princeton University, NJ USA.
    Bastviken, David
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Tranvik, L.J.
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Enrich Prast, Alex
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Greenhouse gas production in low-latitude lake sediments responds strongly to warming2014In: Nature Climate Change, ISSN 1758-678X, E-ISSN 1758-6798, Vol. 4, no 6, p. 467-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inland water sediments receive large quantities of terrestrial organic matter(1-5) and are globally important sites for organic carbon preservation(5,6). Sediment organic matter mineralization is positively related to temperature across a wide range of high-latitude ecosystems(6-10), but the situation in the tropics remains unclear. Here we assessed temperature effects on the biological production of CO2 and CH4 in anaerobic sediments of tropical lakes in the Amazon and boreal lakes in Sweden. On the basis of conservative regional warming projections until 2100 (ref. 11), we estimate that sediment CO2 and CH4 production will increase 9-61% above present rates. Combining the CO2 and CH4 as CO2 equivalents (CO(2)eq; ref. 11), the predicted increase is 2.4-4.5 times higher in tropical than boreal sediments. Although the estimated lake area in low latitudes is 3.2 times smaller than that of the boreal zone, we estimate that the increase in gas production from tropical lake sediments would be on average 2.4 times higher for CO2 and 2.8 times higher for CH4. The exponential temperature response of organic matter mineralization, coupled with higher increases in the proportion of CH4 relative to CO2 on warming, suggests that the production of greenhouse gases in tropical sediments will increase substantially. This represents a potential large-scale positive feedback to climate change.

  • 9.
    Sovacool, Benjamin K.
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Goodsite, Michael E.
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    COMMENTARY: The political economy of climate adaptation in NATURE CLIMATE CHANGE, vol 5, issue 7, pp 616-6182015In: Nature Climate Change, ISSN 1758-678X, E-ISSN 1758-6798, Vol. 5, no 7, p. 616-618Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Initiatives to adapt to the effects of climate change are growing in number but may fail to achieve the desired outcomes unless critical competing interests are taken into account during the planning process.

1 - 9 of 9
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