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  • 1.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany.
    Dingemanse, Niels J.
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Germany.
    Adaptive individual variation in phenological responses to perceived predation levels2019Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, artikel-id 1601Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The adaptive evolution of timing of breeding (a component of phenology) in response to environmental change requires individual variation in phenotypic plasticity for selection to act upon. A major question is what processes generate this variation. Here we apply multi-year manipulations of perceived predation levels (PPL) in an avian predator-prey system, identifying phenotypic plasticity in phenology as a key component of alternative behavioral strategies with equal fitness payoffs. We show that under low-PPL, faster (versus slower) exploring birds breed late (versus early); the pattern is reversed under high-PPL, with breeding synchrony decreasing in conjunction. Timing of breeding affects reproductive success, yet behavioral types have equal fitness. The existence of alternative behavioral strategies thus explains variation in phenology and plasticity in reproductive behavior, which has implications for evolution in response to anthropogenic change.

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  • 2.
    Ahmed, Heba
    et al.
    RMIT Univ, Australia.
    Alijani, Hossein
    RMIT Univ, Australia.
    El Ghazaly, Ahmed
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Materialdesign. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Halim, Joseph
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Materialdesign. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Murdoch, Billy J.
    RMIT Univ, Australia.
    Ehrnst, Yemima
    RMIT Univ, Australia.
    Massahud, Emily
    RMIT Univ, Australia.
    Rezk, Amgad R.
    RMIT Univ, Australia.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Materialdesign. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Yeo, Leslie Y.
    RMIT Univ, Australia.
    Recovery of oxidized two-dimensional MXenes through high frequency nanoscale electromechanical vibration2023Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, nr 1, artikel-id 3Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    MXenes hold immense potential given their superior electrical properties. The practical adoption of these promising materials is, however, severely constrained by their oxidative susceptibility, leading to significant performance deterioration and lifespan limitations. Attempts to preserve MXenes have been limited, and it has not been possible thus far to reverse the materials performance. In this work, we show that subjecting oxidized micron or nanometer thickness dry MXene films-even those constructed from nanometer-order solution-dispersed oxidized flakes-to just one minute of 10 MHz nanoscale electromechanical vibration leads to considerable removal of its surface oxide layer, whilst preserving its structure and characteristics. Importantly, electrochemical performance is recovered close to that of their original state: the pseudocapacitance, which decreased by almost 50% due to its oxidation, reverses to approximately 98% of its original value, with good capacitance retention ( approximate to 93%) following 10,000 charge-discharge cycles at 10 A g(-1). These promising results allude to the exciting possibility for rejuvenating the material for reuse, therefore offering a more economical and sustainable route that improves its potential for practical translation. Despite their vast potential, the practical deployment of MXenes has been hampered by their tendency to be oxidized. Here, the authors show that simply vibrating MXene films in just a minute can remove the oxide layer formed and restore their electrochemical performance close to its original state.

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  • 3.
    Alvez, Maria Bueno
    et al.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Edfors, Fredrik
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    von Feilitzen, Kalle
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Zwahlen, Martin
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden; Kings Coll London, England.
    Edqvist, Per-Henrik
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Sjoblom, Tobias
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lundin, Emma
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Rameika, Natallia
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lindman, Henrik
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Hoglund, Martin
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Hesselager, Goran
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Stalberg, Karin
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Enblad, Malin
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Simonson, Oscar E.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Haggman, Michael
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Tomas
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Aberg, Mikael
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Nordlund, Jessica
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Zhong, Wen
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Karlsson, Max
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Ponten, Fredrik
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Uhlen, Mathias
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Next generation pan-cancer blood proteome profiling using proximity extension assay2023Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, nr 1Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Comprehensive and scalable proteomic profiling of plasma samples can improve the screening and diagnosis of cancer patients. Here, the authors use the Olink Proximity Extension Assay technology to characterise the plasma proteomes of 1477 patients across twelve cancer types, and use machine learning to obtain a protein panel for cancer classification. A comprehensive characterization of blood proteome profiles in cancer patients can contribute to a better understanding of the disease etiology, resulting in earlier diagnosis, risk stratification and better monitoring of the different cancer subtypes. Here, we describe the use of next generation protein profiling to explore the proteome signature in blood across patients representing many of the major cancer types. Plasma profiles of 1463 proteins from more than 1400 cancer patients are measured in minute amounts of blood collected at the time of diagnosis and before treatment. An open access Disease Blood Atlas resource allows the exploration of the individual protein profiles in blood collected from the individual cancer patients. We also present studies in which classification models based on machine learning have been used for the identification of a set of proteins associated with each of the analyzed cancers. The implication for cancer precision medicine of next generation plasma profiling is discussed.

  • 4.
    Amora-Nogueira, Leonardo
    et al.
    Biomass & Water Management Res Ctr NAB UFF, Brazil; Fluminense Fed Univ UFF, Brazil; Fluminense Fed Univ, Brazil.
    Sanders, Christian J.
    Southern Cross Univ, Australia.
    Enrich Prast, Alex
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Miljöförändring. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Univ Fed Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    Monteiro Sanders, Luciana Silva
    Biomass & Water Management Res Ctr NAB UFF, Brazil; Fluminense Fed Univ UFF, Brazil; Fluminense Fed Univ, Brazil; Southern Cross Univ, Australia.
    Abuchacra, Rodrigo Coutinho
    Biomass & Water Management Res Ctr NAB UFF, Brazil; State Univ Rio de Janeiro UERJ FFP, Brazil.
    Moreira-Turcq, Patricia F.
    Inst Rech Dev IRD, France.
    Cordeiro, Renato Campello
    Fluminense Fed Univ, Brazil.
    Gauci, Vincent
    Univ Birmingham, England; Univ Birmingham, England.
    Moreira, Luciane Silva
    Fluminense Fed Univ, Brazil.
    Machado-Silva, Fausto
    Univ Toledo, OH 43606 USA; Univ Fed Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    Libonati, Renata
    Univ Fed Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Univ Lisbon, Portugal; Univ Lisbon, Portugal.
    Fonseca, Thairiny
    Biomass & Water Management Res Ctr NAB UFF, Brazil; Fluminense Fed Univ UFF, Brazil; Fluminense Fed Univ, Brazil.
    Francisco, Cristiane Nunes
    Fluminense Fed Univ, Brazil.
    Marotta, Humberto
    Biomass & Water Management Res Ctr NAB UFF, Brazil; Fluminense Fed Univ UFF, Brazil; Fluminense Fed Univ, Brazil.
    Tropical forests as drivers of lake carbon burial2022Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 13, nr 1, artikel-id 4051Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A significant proportion of carbon (C) captured by terrestrial primary production is buried in lacustrine ecosystems, which have been substantially affected by anthropogenic activities globally. However, there is a scarcity of sedimentary organic carbon (OC) accumulation information for lakes surrounded by highly productive rainforests at warm tropical latitudes, or in response to land cover and climate change. Here, we combine new data from intensive campaigns spanning 13 lakes across remote Amazonian regions with a broad literature compilation, to produce the first spatially-weighted global analysis of recent OC burial in lakes (over ~50-100-years) that integrates both biome type and forest cover. We find that humid tropical forest lake sediments are a disproportionately important global OC sink of 7.4 Tg C yr−1 with implications for climate change. Further, we demonstrate that temperature and forest conservation are key factors in maintaining massive organic carbon pools in tropical lacustrine sediments.

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  • 5.
    Amora-Nogueira, Leonardo
    et al.
    Biomass & Water Management Res Ctr NAB UFF, Brazil; Fluminense Fed Univ UFF, Brazil; Fluminense Fed Univ, Brazil.
    Sanders, Christian J.
    Southern Cross Univ, Australia.
    Enrich Prast, Alex
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Miljöförändring. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Inst Sea, Brazil; Univ Fed Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    Sanders, Luciana Silva Monteiro
    Biomass & Water Management Res Ctr NAB UFF, Brazil; Fluminense Fed Univ UFF, Brazil; Fluminense Fed Univ, Brazil; Southern Cross Univ, Australia.
    Abuchacra, Rodrigo Coutinho
    Biomass & Water Management Res Ctr NAB UFF, Brazil; State Univ Rio de Janeiro UERJ FFP, Brazil.
    Moreira-Turcq, Patricia F.
    IRD, France.
    Cordeiro, Renato Campello
    Fluminense Fed Univ, Brazil.
    Gauci, Vincent
    Univ Birmingham, England.
    Moreira, Luciane Silva
    Fluminense Fed Univ, Brazil.
    Machado-Silva, Fausto
    Univ Toledo, OH 43606 USA; Univ Fed Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    Libonati, Renata
    Univ Fed Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Univ Lisbon, Portugal; Univ Lisbon, Portugal.
    Fonseca, Thairiny
    Biomass & Water Management Res Ctr NAB UFF, Brazil; Fluminense Fed Univ UFF, Brazil; Fluminense Fed Univ, Brazil.
    Francisco, Cristiane Nunes
    Fluminense Fed Univ, Brazil.
    Marotta, Humberto
    Biomass & Water Management Res Ctr NAB UFF, Brazil; Fluminense Fed Univ UFF, Brazil; Fluminense Fed Univ, Brazil.
    Correction: Tropical forests as drivers of lake carbon burial (vol 13, 4051, 2022)2023Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, nr 1, artikel-id 3282Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 6.
    Andersson Ersman, Peter
    et al.
    RISE Acreo, Sweden.
    Lassnig, Roman
    RISE Acreo, Sweden.
    Strandberg, Jan
    RISE Acreo, Sweden.
    Tu, Deyu
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för teknik och naturvetenskap, Laboratoriet för organisk elektronik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Keshmiri, Vahid
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för systemteknik, Informationskodning. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Forchheimer, Robert
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för systemteknik, Informationskodning. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Fabiano, Simone
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för teknik och naturvetenskap, Laboratoriet för organisk elektronik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Gustafsson, Goran
    RISE Acreo, Sweden.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för teknik och naturvetenskap, Laboratoriet för organisk elektronik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    All-printed large-scale integrated circuits based on organic electrochemical transistors2019Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, artikel-id 5053Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The communication outposts of the emerging Internet of Things are embodied by ordinary items, which desirably include all-printed flexible sensors, actuators, displays and akin organic electronic interface devices in combination with silicon-based digital signal processing and communication technologies. However, hybrid integration of smart electronic labels is partly hampered due to a lack of technology that (de)multiplex signals between silicon chips and printed electronic devices. Here, we report all-printed 4-to-7 decoders and seven-bit shift registers, including over 100 organic electrochemical transistors each, thus minimizing the number of terminals required to drive monolithically integrated all-printed electrochromic displays. These relatively advanced circuits are enabled by a reduction of the transistor footprint, an effort which includes several further developments of materials and screen printing processes. Our findings demonstrate that digital circuits based on organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) provide a unique bridge between all-printed organic electronics (OEs) and low-cost silicon chip technology for Internet of Things applications.

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  • 7.
    Andrighetto, Giulia
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Institutet för analytisk sociologi, IAS. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Natl Res Council Italy, Italy; Inst Futures Studies, Sweden.
    Szekely, Aron
    Natl Res Council Italy, Italy; Coll Carlo Alberto, Italy.
    Guido, Andrea
    Natl Res Council Italy, Italy; Inst Futures Studies, Sweden; Univ Bourgogne Franche Comte, France.
    Gelfand, Michele
    Stanford Univ, CA USA.
    Abemathy, Jered
    Univ South Carolina, SC USA.
    Arikan, Gizem
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Ireland.
    Aycan, Zeynep
    Koc Univ, Turkiye.
    Bankar, Shweta
    Ashoka Univ, India.
    Barrera, Davide
    Coll Carlo Alberto, Italy; Univ Turin, Italy.
    Basnight-Brown, Dana
    US Int Univ Africa, Kenya.
    Belaus, Anabel
    Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn CONICET, Argentina; Univ Nacl Cordoba, Argentina.
    Berezina, Elizaveta
    Sunway Univ, Malaysia.
    Blumen, Sheyla
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Peru, Peru.
    Boski, Pawel
    SWPS Univ, Poland.
    Bui, Huyen Thi Thu
    Hanoi Natl Univ Educ, Vietnam.
    Camilo Cardenas, Juan
    Univ Los Andes, Colombia; Univ Massachusetts Amherst, MA USA.
    Cekrlija, Dorde
    Univ Banja Luka, Bosnia & Herceg; Univ Greifswald, Germany.
    de Barra, Micheal
    Brunel Univ London, England.
    de Zoysa, Piyanjali
    Univ Colombo, Sri Lanka.
    Dorrough, Angela
    Univ Cologne, Germany.
    Engelmann, Jan B.
    Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Euh, Hyun
    Univ Illinois, IL USA.
    Fiedler, Susann
    Vienna Univ Econ & Business, Austria.
    Foster-Gimbel, Olivia
    NYU, NY USA.
    Freitas, Goncalo
    Univ Lisbon, Portugal.
    Fulop, Marta
    HUN REN Inst Cognit Neurosci & Psychol, Hungary; Karoli Gaspar Univ Reformed Churches, Hungary.
    Gardarsdottir, Ragna B.
    Univ Iceland, Iceland.
    Gill, Colin Mathew Hugues D.
    Sunway Univ, Malaysia; Universal Coll Bangladesh, Bangladesh.
    Gloeckner, Andreas
    Univ Cologne, Germany.
    Graf, Sylvie
    Czech Acad Sci, Czech Republic.
    Grigoryan, Ani
    Yerevan State Univ, Armenia.
    Growiec, Katarzyna
    SWPS Univ, Poland.
    Hashimoto, Hirofumi
    Osaka Metropolitan Univ, Japan.
    Hopthrow, Tim
    Univ Kent, England.
    Hrebickova, Martina
    Czech Acad Sci, Czech Republic.
    Imada, Hirotaka
    Royal Holloway Univ London, England.
    Kamijo, Yoshio
    Waseda Univ, Japan.
    Kapoor, Hansika
    Monk Prayogshala, India.
    Kashima, Yoshihisa
    Univ Melbourne, Australia.
    Khachatryan, Narine
    Yerevan State Univ, Armenia.
    Kharchenko, Natalia
    Kyiv Int Inst Sociol, Ukraine.
    Leon, Diana
    DeJusticia, Colombia.
    Leslie, Lisa M.
    NYU, NY USA.
    Li, Yang
    Nagoya Univ, Japan.
    Liik, Kadi
    Tallinn Univ, Estonia.
    Liuzza, Marco Tullio
    Magna Graecia Univ Catanzaro, Italy.
    Maitner, Angela T.
    Amer Univ Sharjah, U Arab Emirates.
    Mamidi, Pavan
    Ashoka Univ, India.
    McArdle, Michele
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Ireland.
    Medhioub, Imed
    Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic Univ, Saudi Arabia.
    Mendes Teixeira, Maria Luisa
    Presbyterian Mackenzie Univ, Brazil.
    Mentser, Sari
    Hebrew Univ Jerusalem, Israel.
    Morales, Francisco
    Univ Andes, Chile.
    Narayanan, Jayanth
    Northeastern Univ, MA USA.
    Nitta, Kohei
    Ritsumeikan Univ, Japan.
    Nussinson, Ravit
    Open Univ Israel, Israel; Univ Haifa, Israel.
    Onyedire, Nneoma G.
    Univ Nigeria, Nigeria.
    Onyishi, Ike E.
    Univ Nigeria, Nigeria.
    Osin, Evgeny
    HSE Univ, Russia.
    Ozden, Seniha
    Koc Univ, Turkiye.
    Panagiotopoulou, Penny
    Univ Patras, Greece.
    Pereverziev, Oleksandr
    POLLSTER, Ukraine.
    Perez-Floriano, Lorena R.
    Univ Diego Portales, Chile.
    Pirttila-Backman, Anna-Maija
    Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Pogosyan, Marianna
    Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Raver, Jana
    Queens Univ, Canada.
    Reyna, Cecilia
    Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn CONICET, Argentina.
    Rodrigues, Ricardo Borges
    Inst Univ Lisboa ISCTE IUL, Portugal.
    Romano, Sara
    Univ Turin, Italy.
    Romero, Pedro P.
    Univ San Francisco Quito, Ecuador.
    Sakki, Inari
    Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Sanchez, Angel
    Univ Carlos III Madrid, Spain; Univ Zaragoza, Spain.
    Sherbaji, Sara
    Amer Univ Sharjah, U Arab Emirates; UCL, England.
    Simpson, Brent
    Univ South Carolina, SC USA.
    Spadoni, Lorenzo
    Univ Cassino & Southern Lazio, Italy.
    Stamkou, Eftychia
    Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Travaglino, Giovanni A.
    Royal Holloway Univ London, England.
    Van Lange, Paul A. M.
    Vrije Univ, Netherlands.
    Winata, Fiona Fira
    Univ Airlangga, Indonesia.
    Zein, Rizqy Amelia
    Univ Airlangga, Indonesia.
    Zhang, Qing-peng
    Guangzhou Univ, Peoples R China.
    Eriksson, Kimmo
    Inst Futures Studies, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden; Malardalens Univ, Sweden.
    Changes in social norms during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic across 43 countries2024Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 15, nr 1, artikel-id 1436Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of COVID-19 dramatically changed social behavior across societies and contexts. Here we study whether social norms also changed. Specifically, we study this question for cultural tightness (the degree to which societies generally have strong norms), specific social norms (e.g. stealing, hand washing), and norms about enforcement, using survey data from 30,431 respondents in 43 countries recorded before and in the early stages following the emergence of COVID-19. Using variation in disease intensity, we shed light on the mechanisms predicting changes in social norm measures. We find evidence that, after the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, hand washing norms increased while tightness and punishing frequency slightly decreased but observe no evidence for a robust change in most other norms. Thus, at least in the short term, our findings suggest that cultures are largely stable to pandemic threats except in those norms, hand washing in this case, that are perceived to be directly relevant to dealing with the collective threat. Tightness-looseness theory predicts that social norms strengthen following threat. Here the authors test this and find that, after the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, hand washing norms increased, but no evidence was observed for a robust change in most other norms.

  • 8.
    Aslandukov, Andrey
    et al.
    Univ Bayreuth, Germany.
    Aslandukova, Alena
    Univ Bayreuth, Germany.
    Laniel, Dominique
    Univ Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Khandarkhaeva, Saiana
    Univ Bayreuth, Germany.
    Yin, Yuqing
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Teoretisk Fysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Univ Bayreuth, Germany.
    Akbar, Fariia I.
    Univ Bayreuth, Germany.
    Chariton, Stella
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Prakapenka, Vitali
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Bright, Eleanor Lawrence
    European Synchrotron Radiat Facil, France.
    Giacobbe, Carlotta
    European Synchrotron Radiat Facil, France.
    Wright, Jonathan
    European Synchrotron Radiat Facil, France.
    Comboni, Davide
    European Synchrotron Radiat Facil, France.
    Hanfland, Michael
    European Synchrotron Radiat Facil, France.
    Doubrovinckaia, Natalia
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Teoretisk Fysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Univ Bayreuth, Germany.
    Dubrovinsky, Leonid
    Univ Bayreuth, Germany.
    Stabilization of N6 and N8 anionic units and 2D polynitrogen layers in high-pressure scandium polynitrides2024Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 15, nr 1, artikel-id 2244Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Nitrogen catenation under high pressure leads to the formation of polynitrogen compounds with potentially unique properties. The exploration of the entire spectrum of poly- and oligo-nitrogen moieties is still in its earliest stages. Here, we report on four novel scandium nitrides, Sc2N6, Sc2N8, ScN5, and Sc4N3, synthesized by direct reaction between yttrium and nitrogen at 78-125 GPa and 2500 K in laser-heated diamond anvil cells. High-pressure synchrotron single-crystal X-ray diffraction reveals that in the crystal structures of the nitrogen-rich Sc2N6, Sc2N8, and ScN5 phases nitrogen is catenated forming previously unknown N-6(6)- and N-8(6)- units and infinity 2(N-5(3-)) anionic corrugated 2D-polynitrogen layers consisting of fused N-12 rings. Density functional theory calculations, confirming the dynamical stability of the synthesized compounds, show that Sc2N6 and Sc2N8 possess an anion-driven metallicity, while ScN5 is an indirect semiconductor. Sc2N6, Sc2N8, and ScN5 solids are promising high-energy-density materials with calculated volumetric energy density, detonation velocity, and detonation pressure higher than those of TNT.

  • 9.
    Babacic, Haris
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Christ, Wanda
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Araujo, Jose Eduardo
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Mermelekas, Georgios
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sharma, Nidhi
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Tynell, Janne
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Garcia, Marina
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Varnaite, Renata
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Asgeirsson, Hilmir
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Glans, Hedvig
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Lehtioe, Janne
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Gredmark-Russ, Sara
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lab Mol Infect Med Sweden MIMS, Sweden.
    Klingström, Jonas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för molekylär medicin och virologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Pernemalm, Maria
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Comprehensive proteomics and meta-analysis of COVID-19 host response2023Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, nr 1, artikel-id 5921Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    COVID-19 is characterised by systemic immunological perturbations in the human body, which can lead to multi-organ damage. Many of these processes are considered to be mediated by the blood. Therefore, to better understand the systemic host response to SARS-CoV-2 infection, we performed systematic analyses of the circulating, soluble proteins in the blood through global proteomics by mass-spectrometry (MS) proteomics. Here, we show that a large part of the soluble blood proteome is altered in COVID-19, among them elevated levels of interferon-induced and proteasomal proteins. Some proteins that have alternating levels in human cells after a SARS-CoV-2 infection in vitro and in different organs of COVID-19 patients are deregulated in the blood, suggesting shared infection-related changes.The availability of different public proteomic resources on soluble blood proteome alterations leaves uncertainty about the change of a given protein during COVID-19. Hence, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of MS global proteomics studies of soluble blood proteomes, including up to 1706 individuals (1039 COVID-19 patients), to provide concluding estimates for the alteration of 1517 soluble blood proteins in COVID-19. Finally, based on the meta-analysis we developed CoViMAPP, an open-access resource for effect sizes of alterations and diagnostic potential of soluble blood proteins in COVID-19, which is publicly available for the research, clinical, and academic community. Baba & ccaron;ic et al. performed systematic analyses of blood proteins in COVID-19 patients through mass-spectrometry proteomics, showing that a large part of the soluble blood proteome is altered. The authors then developed an open-access resource, CoViMAPP, for meta-analysis of MS proteomics studies of COVID-19 patients.

  • 10.
    Bai, Yang
    et al.
    Beijing Univ Chem Technol, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Ze
    Beijing Univ Chem Technol, Peoples R China.
    Zhou, Qiuju
    Xinyang Normal Univ, Peoples R China.
    Geng, Hua
    Capital Normal Univ, Peoples R China.
    Chen, Qi
    Beijing Univ Chem Technol, Peoples R China.
    Kim, Seoyoung
    Ulsan Natl Inst Sci & Technol UNIST, South Korea.
    Zhang, Rui
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Elektroniska och fotoniska material. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Zhang, Cen
    Beijing Univ Chem Technol, Peoples R China.
    Chang, Bowen
    Beijing Univ Chem Technol, Peoples R China.
    Li, Shangyu
    Beijing Univ Chem Technol, Peoples R China.
    Fu, Hongyuan
    Beijing Univ Chem Technol, Peoples R China.
    Xue, Lingwei
    Beijing Univ Chem Technol, Peoples R China.
    Wang, Haiqiao
    Beijing Univ Chem Technol, Peoples R China.
    Li, Wenbin
    Zhengzhou Univ, Peoples R China; Zhengzhou Univ, Peoples R China.
    Chen, Weihua
    Zhengzhou Univ, Peoples R China; Zhengzhou Univ, Peoples R China.
    Gao, Mengyuan
    Tianjin Univ, Peoples R China.
    Ye, Long
    Tianjin Univ, Peoples R China.
    Zhou, Yuanyuan
    Hong Kong Baptist Univ, Peoples R China; Hong Kong Baptist Univ, Peoples R China.
    Ouyang, Yanni
    Hong Kong Baptist Univ, Peoples R China; Hong Kong Baptist Univ, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Chunfeng
    Nanjing Univ, Peoples R China; Nanjing Univ, Peoples R China.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Elektroniska och fotoniska material. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Yang, Changduk
    Ulsan Natl Inst Sci & Technol UNIST, South Korea.
    Li, Yongfang
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Zhi-Guo
    Beijing Univ Chem Technol, Peoples R China.
    Geometry design of tethered small-molecule acceptor enables highly stable and efficient polymer solar cells2023Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, nr 1, artikel-id 2926Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    With the power conversion efficiency of binary polymer solar cells dramatically improved, the thermal stability of the small-molecule acceptors raised the main concerns on the device operating stability. Here, to address this issue, thiophene-dicarboxylate spacer tethered small-molecule acceptors are designed, and their molecular geometries are further regulated via the thiophene-core isomerism engineering, affording dimeric TDY-alpha with a 2, 5-substitution and TDY-beta with 3, 4-substitution on the core. It shows that TDY-alpha processes a higher glass transition temperature, better crystallinity relative to its individual small-molecule acceptor segment and isomeric counterpart of TDY-beta, and amore stablemorphology with the polymer donor. As a result, the TDY-alpha based device delivers a higher device efficiency of 18.1%, and most important, achieves an extrapolated lifetime of about 35000 hours that retaining 80% of their initial efficiency. Our result suggests that with proper geometry design, the tethered small-molecule acceptors can achieve both high device efficiency and operating stability.

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  • 11.
    Barabas, György
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Teoretisk Biologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. ELTE MTA Theoret Biol & Evolutionary Ecol Res Grp, Hungary.
    Parent, Christine
    Univ Idaho, ID 83844 USA.
    Kraemer, Andrew
    Creighton Univ, NE 68178 USA.
    Van de Perre, Frederik
    Univ Antwerp, Belgium.
    De Laender, Frederik
    Univ Namur, Belgium.
    The evolution of trait variance creates a tension between species diversity and functional diversity2022Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 13, nr 1, artikel-id 2521Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    It seems intuitively obvious that species diversity promotes functional diversity: communities with more plant species imply more varied plant leaf chemistry, more species of crops provide more kinds of food, etc. Recent literature has nuanced this view, showing how the relationship between the two can be modulated along latitudinal or environmental gradients. Here we show that even without such effects, the evolution of functional trait variance can erase or even reverse the expected positive relationship between species- and functional diversity. We present theory showing that trait-based eco-evolutionary processes force species to evolve narrower trait breadths in more tightly packed, species-rich communities, in their effort to avoid competition with neighboring species. This effect is so strong that it leads to an overall reduction in trait space coverage whenever a new species establishes. Empirical data from land snail communities on the Galapagos Islands are consistent with this claim. The finding that the relationship between species- and functional diversity can be negative implies that trait data from species-poor communities may misjudge functional diversity in species-rich ones, and vice versa. The positive relationship between species diversity and functional diversity has been shown to vary. Here, the authors use theoretical models and data from Galapagos land snail communities to show how eco-evolutionary processes can force species to evolve narrower trait breadths in more species-rich communities to avoid competition, creating a negative relationship.

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  • 12.
    Belonoshko, Anatoly B.
    et al.
    Royal Inst Technol KTH, Sweden.
    Fu, Jie
    Ningbo Univ, Peoples R China.
    Bryk, Taras
    Natl Acad Sci Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Simak, Sergey
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Teoretisk Fysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Mattesini, Maurizio
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Spain; UCM, Spain.
    Low viscosity of the Earths inner core2019Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, artikel-id 2483Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Earths solid inner core is a highly attenuating medium. It consists mainly of iron. The high attenuation of sound wave propagation in the inner core is at odds with the widely accepted paradigm of hexagonal close-packed phase stability under inner core conditions, because sound waves propagate through the hexagonal iron without energy dissipation. Here we show by first-principles molecular dynamics that the body-centered cubic phase of iron, recently demonstrated to be thermodynamically stable under the inner core conditions, is considerably less elastic than the hexagonal phase. Being a crystalline phase, the body-centered cubic phase of iron possesses the viscosity close to that of a liquid iron. The high attenuation of sound in the inner core is due to the unique diffusion characteristic of the body-centered cubic phase. The low viscosity of iron in the inner core enables the convection and resolves a number of controversies.

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  • 13.
    Bian, Qingzhen
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biomolekylär och Organisk Elektronik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Ma, Fei
    Division of Chemical Physics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Chen, Shula
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Wei, Qi
    Institute of Applied Physics and Materials Engineering, University of Macau, Macau SAR, China.
    Su, Xiaojun
    Division of Chemical Physics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Buyanova, Irina A
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biomolekylär och Organisk Elektronik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biomolekylär och Organisk Elektronik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Ponseca, Carlito S.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biomolekylär och Organisk Elektronik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Linares, Mathieu
    Department of Theoretical Chemistry and Biology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karki, Khadga J.
    Division of Chemical Physics, Lund University, 22100, Lund, Sweden.
    Yartsev, Arkady
    Division of Chemical Physics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biomolekylär och Organisk Elektronik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Vibronic coherence contributes to photocurrent generation in organic semiconductor heterojunction diodes2020Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 11, nr 1, artikel-id 617Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Charge separation dynamics after the absorption of a photon is a fundamental process relevant both for photosynthetic reaction centers and artificial solar conversion devices. It has been proposed that quantum coherence plays a role in the formation of charge carriers in organic photovoltaics, but experimental proofs have been lacking. Here we report experimental evidence of coherence in the charge separation process in organic donor/acceptor heterojunctions, in the form of low frequency oscillatory signature in the kinetics of the transient absorption and nonlinear two-dimensional photocurrent spectroscopy. The coherence plays a decisive role in the initial ~200 femtoseconds as we observe distinct experimental signatures of coherent photocurrent generation. This coherent process breaks the energy barrier limitation for charge formation, thus competing with excitation energy transfer. The physics may inspire the design of new photovoltaic materials with high device performance, which explore the quantum effects in the next-generation optoelectronic applications.

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  • 14.
    Boggio, J. M. Chavez
    et al.
    InnoFSPEC Leibniz Inst Astrophys Potsdam, Germany.
    Bodenmüller, D.
    InnoFSPEC Leibniz Inst Astrophys Potsdam, Germany.
    Ahmed, S.
    InnoFSPEC Leibniz Inst Astrophys Potsdam, Germany.
    Wabnitz, S.
    Sapienza Univ Roma, Italy; Ist Nazl Ottica, Italy.
    Modotto, D.
    Univ Brescia, Italy.
    Hansson, Tobias
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Teoretisk Fysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Efficient Kerr soliton comb generation in micro-resonator with interferometric back-coupling2022Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 13, nr 1, artikel-id 1292Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Nonlinear Kerr micro-resonators have enabled fundamental breakthroughs in the understanding of dissipative solitons, as well as in their application to optical frequency comb generation. However, the conversion efficiency of the pump power into a soliton frequency comb typically remains below a few percent. We fabricate and characterize a hybrid Mach-Zehnder ring resonator geometry, consisting of a micro-ring resonator embedded in an additional cavity with twice the optical path length of the ring. The resulting interferometric back coupling enables to achieve an unprecedented control of the pump depletion: pump-to-frequency comb conversion efficiencies of up to 55% of the input pump power is experimentally demonstrated with a soliton crystal comb. We assess the robustness of the proposed on-chip geometry by generating a large variety of dissipative Kerr soliton combs, which require a lower amount of pump power to be accessed, when compared with an isolated micro-ring resonator with identical parameters. Micro-resonators with feedback enable accessing new regimes of coherent soliton comb generation, and are well suited for comb applications in astronomy, spectroscopy and telecommunications. Increasing the conversion efficiency of soliton crystals will enable further application of optical frequency comb. Here the authors engineer an hybrid Mach-Zehnder micro-ring resonator to achieve 80% pump-to-comb conversion efficiency based on dissipative Kerr solitons.

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  • 15.
    Bykov, M.
    et al.
    Univ Bayreuth, Germany.
    Bykova, E.
    Univ Bayreuth, Germany; DESY, Germany.
    Aprilis, G.
    Univ Bayreuth, Germany.
    Glazyrin, K.
    DESY, Germany.
    Koemets, E.
    Univ Bayreuth, Germany.
    Chuvashova, I
    Univ Bayreuth, Germany; Univ Bayreuth, Germany.
    Kupenko, I
    Univ Munster, Germany.
    McCammon, C.
    Univ Bayreuth, Germany.
    Mezouar, M.
    European Synchrotron Radiat Facil, France.
    Prakapenka, V
    Univ Chicago, IL 60437 USA.
    Liermann, H-P
    DESY, Germany.
    Tasnadi, Ferenc
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Teoretisk Fysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Natl Univ Sci and Technol MISIS, Russia.
    Ponomareva, A. V
    Natl Univ Sci and Technol MISIS, Russia.
    Abrikosov, Igor
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Teoretisk Fysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Dubrovinskaia, N.
    Univ Bayreuth, Germany.
    Dubrovinsky, L.
    Univ Bayreuth, Germany.
    Fe-N system at high pressure reveals a compound featuring polymeric nitrogen chains2018Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, artikel-id 2756Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Poly-nitrogen compounds have been considered as potential high energy density materials for a long time due to the large number of energetic N-N or N=N bonds. In most cases high nitrogen content and stability at ambient conditions are mutually exclusive, thereby making the synthesis of such materials challenging. One way to stabilize such compounds is the application of high pressure. Here, through a direct reaction between Fe and N-2 in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell, we synthesize three ironnitrogen compounds Fe3N2, FeN2 and FeN4. Their crystal structures are revealed by single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Fe3N2, synthesized at 50 GPa, is isostructural to chromium carbide Cr3C2. FeN2 has a marcasite structure type and features covalently bonded dinitrogen units in its crystal structure. FeN4, synthesized at 106 GPa, features polymeric nitrogen chains of [N-4(2-)](n) units. Based on results of structural studies and theoretical analysis, [N-4(2-)](n) units in this compound reveal catena-poly[tetraz-1-ene-1,4-diyl] anions.

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  • 16.
    Bykov, Maxim
    et al.
    Univ Bayreuth, Germany.
    Chariton, Stella
    Univ Bayreuth, Germany.
    Fei, Hongzhan
    Univ Bayreuth, Germany.
    Fedotenko, Timofey
    Univ Bayreuth, Germany.
    Aprilis, Georgios
    Univ Bayreuth, Germany.
    Ponomareva, Alena V
    Natl Univ Sci and Technol MISIS, Russia.
    Tasnadi, Ferenc
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Teoretisk Fysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Abrikosov, Igor
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Teoretisk Fysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Merle, Benoit
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg FAU, Germany.
    Feldners, Patrick
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg FAU, Germany.
    Vogel, Sebastian
    Univ Munich LMU, Germany.
    Schnick, Wolfgang
    Univ Munich LMU, Germany.
    Prakapenka, Vitali B.
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Greenberg, Eran
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Hanfland, Michael
    European Synchrotron Radiat Facil, France.
    Pakhomova, Anna
    DESY, Germany.
    Liermann, Hanns-Peter
    DESY, Germany.
    Katsura, Tomoo
    Univ Bayreuth, Germany.
    Dubrovinskaia, Natalia
    Univ Bayreuth, Germany.
    Dubrovinsky, Leonid
    Univ Bayreuth, Germany.
    High-pressure synthesis of ultraincompressible hard rhenium nitride pernitride Re-2(N-2)(N)(2) stable at ambient conditions2019Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, artikel-id 2994Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    High-pressure synthesis in diamond anvil cells can yield unique compounds with advanced properties, but often they are either unrecoverable at ambient conditions or produced in quantity insufficient for properties characterization. Here we report the synthesis of metallic, ultraincompressible (K-0 = 428(10) GPa), and very hard (nanoindentation hardness 36.7(8) GPa) rhenium nitride pernitride Re-2(N-2)(N)(2). Unlike known transition metals pernitrides Re-2(N-2)(N)(2) contains both pernitride N-2(4-) and discrete N3- anions, which explains its exceptional properties. Re-2(N-2)(N)(2) can be obtained via a reaction between rhenium and nitrogen in a diamond anvil cell at pressures from 40 to 90 GPa and is recoverable at ambient conditions. We develop a route to scale up its synthesis through a reaction between rhenium and ammonium azide, NH4N3, in a large-volume press at 33 GPa. Although metallic bonding is typically seen incompatible with intrinsic hardness, Re-2(N-2)(N)(2) turned to be at a threshold for superhard materials.

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  • 17.
    Bykova, E.
    et al.
    DESY, Germany; Univ Bayreuth, Germany.
    Bykov, M.
    Univ Bayreuth, Germany; Natl Univ Sci and Technol MISIS, Russia.
    Cernok, A.
    Univ Bayreuth, Germany; Open Univ, England.
    Tidholm, Johan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Teoretisk Fysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Simak, Sergey
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Teoretisk Fysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Hellman, Olle
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Teoretisk Fysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. CALTECH, CA 91125 USA.
    Belov, M. P.
    Natl Univ Sci and Technol MISIS, Russia.
    Abrikosov, Igor
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Teoretisk Fysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Liermann, H. -P.
    DESY, Germany.
    Hanfland, M.
    European Synchrotron Radiat Facil, France.
    Prakapenka, V. B.
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Prescher, C.
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA; Univ Cologne, Germany.
    Dubrovinskaia, N.
    Univ Bayreuth, Germany.
    Dubrovinsky, L.
    Univ Bayreuth, Germany.
    Metastable silica high pressure polymorphs as structural proxies of deep Earth silicate melts2018Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, artikel-id 4789Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Modelling of processes involving deep Earth liquids requires information on their structures and compression mechanisms. However, knowledge of the local structures of silicates and silica (SiO2) melts at deep mantle conditions and of their densification mechanisms is still limited. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of metastable high-pressure silica phases, coesite-IV and coesite-V, using in situ single-crystal X-ray diffraction and ab initio simulations. Their crystal structures are drastically different from any previously considered models, but explain well features of pair-distribution functions of highly densified silica glass and molten basalt at high pressure. Built of four, five-, and six-coordinated silicon, coesite-IV and coesite-V contain SiO6 octahedra, which, at odds with 3rd Paulings rule, are connected through common faces. Our results suggest that possible silicate liquids in Earths lower mantle may have complex structures making them more compressible than previously supposed.

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  • 18.
    Calafat, Francisco M.
    et al.
    Natl Oceanog Ctr, Joseph Proudman Bldg,6 Brownlow St, Liverpool L3 5DA, Merseyside, England.
    Wahl, Thomas
    Univ Cent Florida, Natl Ctr Integrated Coastal Res, 12800 Pegasus Dr,Suite 211, Orlando, FL 32816 USA;Univ Cent Florida, Dept Civil Environm & Construct Engn, USA.
    Lindsten, Fredrik
    Uppsala universitet, Reglerteknik, Sweden.
    Williams, Joanne
    Natl Oceanog Ctr, England.
    Frajka-Williams, Eleanor
    Univ Southampton, Ocean & Earth Sci, European Way, England.
    Coherent modulation of the sea-level annual cycle in the United States by Atlantic Rossby waves2018Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, artikel-id 2571Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in the sea-level annual cycle (SLAC) can have profound impacts on coastal areas, including increased flooding risk and ecosystem alteration, yet little is known about the magnitude and drivers of such changes. Here we show, using novel Bayesian methods, that there are significant decadal fluctuations in the amplitude of the SLAC along the United States Gulf and Southeast coasts, including an extreme event in 2008-2009 that is likely (probability = 68%) unprecedented in the tide-gauge record. Such fluctuations are coherent along the coast but decoupled from deep-ocean changes. Through the use of numerical and analytical ocean models, we show that the primary driver of these fluctuations involves incident Rossby waves that generate fast western-boundary waves. These Rossby waves project onto the basin-wide upper mid-ocean transport (top 1000 m) leading to a link with the SLAC, wherein larger SLAC amplitudes coincide with enhanced transport variability.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 19.
    Cao, Nan
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Tunnfilmsfysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Tech Univ Munich, Germany.
    Yang, Biao
    Tech Univ Munich, Germany.
    Riss, Alexander
    Tech Univ Munich, Germany.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Materialdesign. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Björk, Jonas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Materialdesign. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Barth, Johannes V.
    Tech Univ Munich, Germany.
    On-surface synthesis of enetriynes2023Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, nr 1, artikel-id 1255Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Belonging to the enyne family, enetriynes comprise a distinct electron-rich all-carbon bonding scheme. However, the lack of convenient synthesis protocols limits the associated application potential within, e.g., biochemistry and materials science. Herein we introduce a pathway for highly selective enetriyne formation via tetramerization of terminal alkynes on a Ag(100) surface. Taking advantage of a directing hydroxyl group, we steer molecular assembly and reaction processes on square lattices. Induced by O-2 exposure the terminal alkyne moieties deprotonate and organometallic bis-acetylide dimer arrays evolve. Upon subsequent thermal annealing tetrameric enetriyne-bridged compounds are generated in high yield, readily self-assembling into regular networks. We combine high-resolution scanning probe microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations to examine the structural features, bonding characteristics and the underlying reaction mechanism. Our study introduces an integrated strategy for the precise fabrication of functional enetriyne species, thus providing access to a distinct class of highly conjugated pi-system compounds. Enetriynes, which belong to the enyne family, are characterized by a distinct electron-rich carbon-bonding scheme. Here, the authors report the formation of enetriynes with high selectivity by tetramerization of terminal alkynes on Ag(100).

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  • 20.
    Cardin, Velia
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Orfanidou, Eleni
    University College London, UK and University of Crete, Greece.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Capek, Cheryl M.
    University of Manchester, UK.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Woll, Bencie
    University College London, UK.
    Dissociating cognitive and sensory neural plasticity in human superior temporal cortex2013Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 4, nr 2Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Disentangling the effects of sensory and cognitive factors on neural reorganization is fundamental for establishing the relationship between plasticity and functional specialization. Auditory deprivation in humans provides a unique insight into this problem, because the origin of the anatomical and functional changes observed in deaf individuals is not only sensory, but also cognitive, owing to the implementation of visual communication strategies such as sign language and speechreading. Here, we describe a functional magnetic resonance imaging study of individuals with different auditory deprivation and sign language experience. We find that sensory and cognitive experience cause plasticity in anatomically and functionally distinguishable substrates. This suggests that after plastic reorganization, cortical regions adapt to process a different type of input signal, but preserve the nature of the computation they perform, both at a sensory and cognitive level.

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  • 21.
    Carlstrom, Karl E.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ewing, Ewoud
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Granqvist, Mathias
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Gyllenberg, Alexandra
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Aeinehband, Shahin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Enoksson, Sara Lind
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Checa, Antonio
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Badam, Tejaswi
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Bioinformatik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Univ Skovde, Sweden.
    Huang, Jesse
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Gomez-Cabrero, David
    Univ Publ Nevarra UPNA, Spain.
    Gustafsson, Mika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Bioinformatik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Al Nimer, Faiez
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Wheelock, Craig E.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kockum, Ingrid
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Olsson, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Jagodic, Maja
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Piehl, Fredrik
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Therapeutic efficacy of dimethyl fumarate in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis associates with ROS pathway in monocytes2019Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, artikel-id 3081Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is a first-line-treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). The redox master regulator Nrf2, essential for redox balance, is a target of DMF, but its precise therapeutic mechanisms of action remain elusive. Here we show impact of DMF on circulating monocytes and T cells in a prospective longitudinal RRMS patient cohort. DMF increases the level of oxidized isoprostanes in peripheral blood. Other observed changes, including methylome and transcriptome profiles, occur in monocytes prior to T cells. Importantly, monocyte counts and monocytic ROS increase following DMF and distinguish patients with beneficial treatment-response from non-responders. A single nucleotide polymorphism in the ROS-generating NOX3 gene is associated with beneficial DMF treatment-response. Our data implicate monocyte-derived oxidative processes in autoimmune diseases and their treatment, and identify NOX3 genetic variant, monocyte counts and redox state as parameters potentially useful to inform clinical decisions on DMF therapy of RRMS.

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  • 22.
    Case, Laura K.
    et al.
    NIH, MD 20892 USA; Univ Calif San Diego, CA 92103 USA.
    Liljencrantz, Jaquette
    NIH, MD 20892 USA; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Madian, Nicholas
    NIH, MD 20892 USA.
    Necaise, Aaron
    NIH, MD 20892 USA.
    Tubbs, Justin
    NIH, MD 20892 USA.
    McCall, Micaela
    NIH, MD 20892 USA.
    Bradson, Megan L.
    NIH, MD 20892 USA.
    Szczot, Marcin
    NIH, MD 20892 USA.
    Pitcher, Mark H.
    NIH, MD 20892 USA.
    Ghitani, Nima
    NIH, MD 20892 USA.
    Frangos, Eleni
    NIH, MD 20892 USA.
    Cole, Jonathan
    Bournemouth Univ, England.
    Bharucha-Goebel, Diana
    NINDS, MD 20892 USA.
    Saade, Dimah
    NINDS, MD 20892 USA.
    Ogata, Tracy
    NINDS, MD 20892 USA.
    Donkervoort, Sandra
    NINDS, MD 20892 USA.
    Foley, A. Reghan
    NINDS, MD 20892 USA.
    Bonnemann, Carsten G.
    NINDS, MD 20892 USA.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Neurofysiologiska kliniken US.
    Bushnell, M. Catherine
    NIH, MD 20892 USA.
    Chesler, Alexander T.
    NIH, MD 20892 USA; NINDS, MD 20892 USA.
    Innocuous pressure sensation requires A-type afferents but not functional Rho Iota Epsilon Zeta Omicron 2 channels in humans2021Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 12, nr 1, artikel-id 657Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The sensation of pressure allows us to feel sustained compression and body strain. While our understanding of cutaneous touch has grown significantly in recent years, how deep tissue sensations are detected remains less clear. Here, we use quantitative sensory evaluations of patients with rare sensory disorders, as well as nerve blocks in typical individuals, to probe the neural and genetic mechanisms for detecting non-painful pressure. We show that the ability to perceive innocuous pressures is lost when myelinated fiber function is experimentally blocked in healthy volunteers and that two patients lacking A beta fibers are strikingly unable to feel innocuous pressures at all. We find that seven individuals with inherited mutations in the mechanoreceptor PIEZO2 gene, who have major deficits in touch and proprioception, are nearly as good at sensing pressure as healthy control subjects. Together, these data support a role for A beta afferents in pressure sensation and suggest the existence of an unknown molecular pathway for its detection. The mechanisms underlying deep pressure sensing are not fully understood. Here the authors demonstrate that while two individuals lacking A beta fibers demonstrate impaired deep pressure sensing, seven individuals with PIEZO2 loss of function mutations display normal deep pressure responses.

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  • 23.
    Charalambidis, Georgios
    et al.
    University of Crete, Greece.
    Georgilis, Evangelos
    University of Crete, Greece; Fdn Research and Technology Hellas FORTH, Greece.
    Panda, Manas K.
    University of Crete, Greece; CSIR NIIST, India.
    Anson, Christopher E.
    Karlsruhe Institute Technology, Germany.
    Powell, Annie K.
    Karlsruhe Institute Technology, Germany; Karlsruhe Institute Technology, Germany.
    Doyle, Stephen
    Karlsruhe Institute Technology, Germany; Karlsruhe Institute Technology, Germany.
    Moss, David
    Karlsruhe Institute Technology, Germany; Karlsruhe Institute Technology, Germany.
    Jochum, Tobias
    Karlsruhe Institute Technology, Germany; Karlsruhe Institute Technology, Germany; Abcr GmbH, Germany.
    Horton, Peter N.
    University of Southampton, England.
    Coles, Simon J.
    University of Southampton, England.
    Linares, Mathieu
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Bioinformatik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Beljonne, David
    University of Mons UMONS, Belgium; University of Mons UMONS, Belgium.
    Naubron, Jean-Valere
    Aix Marseille University, France.
    Conradt, Jonas
    Karlsruhe Institute Technology, Germany; Karlsruhe Institute Technology, Germany.
    Kalt, Heinz
    Karlsruhe Institute Technology, Germany; Karlsruhe Institute Technology, Germany.
    Mitraki, Anna
    University of Crete, Greece; Fdn Research and Technology Hellas FORTH, Greece.
    Coutsolelos, Athanassios G.
    University of Crete, Greece.
    Silviu Balaban, Teodor
    Aix Marseille University, France.
    A switchable self-assembling and disassembling chiral system based on a porphyrin-substituted phenylalanine-phenylalanine motif2016Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 7, nr 12657Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Artificial light-harvesting systems have until now not been able to self-assemble into structures with a large photon capture cross-section that upon a stimulus reversibly can switch into an inactive state. Here we describe a simple and robust FLFL-dipeptide construct to which a meso-tetraphenylporphyrin has been appended and which self-assembles to fibrils, platelets or nanospheres depending on the solvent composition. The fibrils, functioning as quenched antennas, give intense excitonic couplets in the electronic circular dichroism spectra which are mirror imaged if the unnatural FDFD-analogue is used. By slightly increasing the solvent polarity, these light-harvesting fibres disassemble to spherical structures with silent electronic circular dichroism spectra but which fluoresce. Upon further dilution with the nonpolar solvent, the intense Cotton effects are recovered, thus proving a reversible switching. A single crystal X-ray structure shows a head-to-head arrangement of porphyrins that explains both their excitonic coupling and quenched fluorescence.

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  • 24.
    Chen, Gefei
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Abelein, Axel
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Harriet E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Leppert, Axel
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Andrade-Talavera, Yuniesky
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Tambaro, Simone
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hemmingsson, Lovisa
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Roshan, Firoz
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Landreh, Michael
    University of Oxford, England; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Biverstal, Henrik
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Latvian Institute Organ Synth, Latvia.
    Koeck, Philip J. B.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Presto, Jenny
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hebert, Hans
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Fisahn, Andre
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Johansson, Jan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bri2 BRICHOS client specificity and chaperone activity are governed by assembly state2017Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, artikel-id 2081Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    . Protein misfolding and aggregation is increasingly being recognized as a cause of disease. In Alzheimers disease the amyloid-beta peptide (A beta) misfolds into neurotoxic oligomers and assembles into amyloid fibrils. The Bri2 protein associated with Familial British and Danish dementias contains a BRICHOS domain, which reduces A beta fibrillization as well as neurotoxicity in vitro and in a Drosophila model, but also rescues proteins from irreversible nonfibrillar aggregation. How these different activities are mediated is not known. Here we show that Bri2 BRICHOS monomers potently prevent neuronal network toxicity of A beta, while dimers strongly suppress A beta fibril formation. The dimers assemble into high-molecular-weight oligomers with an apparent two-fold symmetry, which are efficient inhibitors of non-fibrillar protein aggregation. These results indicate that Bri2 BRICHOS affects qualitatively different aspects of protein misfolding and toxicity via different quaternary structures, suggesting a means to generate molecular chaperone diversity.

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  • 25.
    Chen, Shula
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Ytors Fysik och Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Huang, Yuqing
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Ytors Fysik och Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Visser, Dennis
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Anand, Srinivasan
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Buyanova, Irina
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Ytors Fysik och Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Ytors Fysik och Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Room-temperature polarized spin-photon interface based on a semiconductor nanodisk-in-nanopillar structure driven by few defects2018Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, artikel-id 3575Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Owing to their superior optical properties, semiconductor nanopillars/nanowires in one-dimensional (1D) geometry are building blocks for nano-photonics. They also hold potential for efficient polarized spin-light conversion in future spin nano-photonics. Unfortunately, spin generation in 1D systems so far remains inefficient at room temperature. Here we propose an approach that can significantly enhance the radiative efficiency of the electrons with the desired spin while suppressing that with the unwanted spin, which simultaneously ensures strong spin and light polarization. We demonstrate high optical polarization of 20%, inferring high electron spin polarization up to 60% at room temperature in a 1D system based on a GaNAs nanodisk-in-GaAs nanopillar structure, facilitated by spin-dependent recombination via merely 2-3 defects in each nanodisk. Our approach points to a promising direction for realization of an interface for efficient spin-photon quantum information transfer at room temperature-a key element for future spin-photonic applications.

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  • 26.
    Chen, Zhuo
    et al.
    Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Leoben, Austria.
    Huang, Yong
    Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Leoben, Austria.
    Koutná, Nikola
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Teoretisk Fysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Institute of Materials Science and Technology, TU Wien, A-1060, Vienna, Austria.
    Gao, Zecui
    Institute of Materials Science and Technology, TU Wien, Vienna, Austria.
    Sangiovanni, Davide Giuseppe
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Teoretisk Fysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Fellner, Simon
    Institute of Materials Science and Technology, TU Wien, Vienna, Austria.
    Haberfehlner, Georg
    Institute of Electron Microscopy and Nanoanalysis, Graz University of Technology, Graz, Austria.
    Jin, Shengli
    Chair of Ceramics, Montanuniversität Leoben, Leoben, Austria.
    Mayrhofer, Paul H.
    Institute of Materials Science and Technology, TU Wien, Vienna, Austria.
    Kothleitner, Gerald
    Institute of Electron Microscopy and Nanoanalysis, Graz University of Technology, Graz, Austria; Graz Centre for Electron Microscopy, Graz, Austria.
    Zhang, Zaoli
    Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Leoben, Austria; Department of Materials Science, Montanuniversität Leoben, Leoben, Austria.
    Large mechanical properties enhancement in ceramics through vacancy-mediated unit cell disturbance2023Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, nr 1, artikel-id 8387Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Tailoring vacancies is a feasible way to improve the mechanical properties of ceramics. However, high concentrations of vacancies usually compromise the strength (or hardness). We show that a high elasticity and flexural strength could be achieved simultaneously using a nitride superlattice architecture with disordered anion vacancies up to 50%. Enhanced mechanical properties primarily result from a distinctive deformation mechanism in superlattice ceramics, i.e., unit-cell disturbances. Such a disturbance substantially relieves local high-stress concentration, thus enhancing deformability. No dislocation activity involved also rationalizes its high strength. The work renders a unique understanding of the deformation and strengthening/toughening mechanism in nitride ceramics.

  • 27.
    Cilibrizzi, Pasquale
    et al.
    Heriot Watt Univ, Scotland.
    Arshad, Muhammad Junaid
    Heriot Watt Univ, Scotland.
    Tissot, Benedikt
    Univ Konstanz, Germany.
    Nguyen, Son Tien
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Halvledarmaterial. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Ivanov, Ivan Gueorguiev
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Halvledarmaterial. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Astner, Thomas
    Austrian Acad Sci, Austria.
    Koller, Philipp
    Austrian Acad Sci, Austria.
    Ghezellou, Misagh
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Halvledarmaterial. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Ul-Hassan, Jawad
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Halvledarmaterial. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    White, Daniel
    Heriot Watt Univ, Scotland.
    Bekker, Christiaan
    Heriot Watt Univ, Scotland.
    Burkard, Guido
    Univ Konstanz, Germany.
    Trupke, Michael
    Austrian Acad Sci, Austria.
    Bonato, Cristian
    Heriot Watt Univ, Scotland.
    Ultra-narrow inhomogeneous spectral distribution of telecom-wavelength vanadium centres in isotopically-enriched silicon carbide2023Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, nr 1, artikel-id 8448Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Spin-active quantum emitters have emerged as a leading platform for quantum technologies. However, one of their major limitations is the large spread in optical emission frequencies, which typically extends over tens of GHz. Here, we investigate single V4+ vanadium centres in 4H-SiC, which feature telecom-wavelength emission and a coherent S = 1/2 spin state. We perform spectroscopy on single emitters and report the observation of spin-dependent optical transitions, a key requirement for spin-photon interfaces. By engineering the isotopic composition of the SiC matrix, we reduce the inhomogeneous spectral distribution of different emitters down to 100 MHz, significantly smaller than any other single quantum emitter. Additionally, we tailor the dopant concentration to stabilise the telecom-wavelength V4+ charge state, thereby extending its lifetime by at least two orders of magnitude. These results bolster the prospects for single V emitters in SiC as material nodes in scalable telecom quantum networks. Several solid-state defect platforms have been proposed for application as a spin-photon interface in quantum communication networks. Here the authors report spin-selective optical transitions and narrow inhomogeneous spectral distribution of V centers in isotopically-enriched SiC emitting in the telecom O-band.

  • 28.
    Cirera, Borja
    et al.
    IMDEA Nanoscience, c/Faraday 9, Cantoblanco,Madrid, Spain.
    Giménez-Agulló, Nelson
    Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia, Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Avinguda Pa¨ısos Catalans 16, Tarragona, Spain.
    Björk, Jonas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Teoretisk kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Martínez-Peña, Francisco
    IMDEA Nanoscience, c/Faraday 9, Cantoblanco,Madrid, Spain..
    Martin-Jimenez, Alberto
    IMDEA Nanoscience, c/Faraday 9, Cantoblanco,Madrid, Spain..
    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Jonathan
    Departamento de F´ısica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Auto´noma de Madrid, c/Francisco Toma´s y Valiente.
    Pizarro, Ana M.
    IMDEA Nanoscience, c/Faraday 9, Cantoblanco,Madrid, Spain..
    Otero, Roberto
    IMDEA Nanoscience, c/Faraday 9, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid, Spain,Universidad Auto´noma de Madrid, c/Francisco Toma´s y Valiente.
    Gallego, José M.
    Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, c/ Sor Juana Ine´s de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco,Madrid, Spain..
    Ballester, Pablo
    Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia, Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Avinguda Pa¨ısos Catalans 16, Tarragona, Spain/Catalan Institutionfor Research and Advanced Studies, Passeig Lluis Companys 23, Barcelona, Spain..
    Galan-Mascaros, José R.
    Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia, Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Avinguda Pa¨ısos Catalans 16, Tarragona, Spain/Catalan Institutionfor Research and Advanced Studies, Passeig Lluis Companys 23, Barcelona, Spain..
    Ecija, David
    IMDEA Nanoscience, c/Faraday 9, Cantoblanco, Madrid, Spain.
    Thermal selectivity of intermolecular versus intramolecular reactions on surfaces2016Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 7, nr 11002Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    On-surface synthesis is a promising strategy for engineering heteroatomic covalent nanoarchitectures with prospects in electronics, optoelectronics and photovoltaics. Here we report the thermal tunability of reaction pathways of a molecular precursor in order to select intramolecular versus intermolecular reactions, yielding monomeric or polymeric phthalocyanine derivatives, respectively. Deposition of tetra-aza-porphyrin species bearing ethyl termini on Au(111) held at room temperature results in a close-packed assembly. Upon annealing from room temperature to 275 °C, the molecular precursors undergo a series of covalent reactions via their ethyl termini, giving rise to phthalocyanine tapes. However, deposition of the tetra-aza-porphyrin derivatives on Au(111) held at 300 °C results in the formation and self-assembly of monomeric phthalocyanines. A systematic scanning tunnelling microscopy study of reaction intermediates, combined with density functional calculations, suggests a [2+2] cycloaddition as responsible for the initial linkage between molecular precursors, whereas the monomeric reaction is rationalized as an electrocyclic ring closure.

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  • 29.
    Couch, Fergus J.
    et al.
    Mayo Clin, MN 55905 USA; Mayo Clin, MN 55905 USA.
    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Michailidou, Kyriaki
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A.
    University of S Florida, FL 33612 USA.
    Nord, Silje
    Radiumhosp, Norway.
    Lilyquist, Janna
    Mayo Clin, MN 55905 USA.
    Olswold, Curtis
    Mayo Clin, MN 55905 USA.
    Hallberg, Emily
    Mayo Clin, MN 55905 USA.
    Agata, Simona
    IRCCS, Italy.
    Ahsan, Habibul
    University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA; University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA; University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Aittomaeki, Kristiina
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Ambrosone, Christine
    Roswell Pk Cancer Institute, NY 14263 USA.
    Andrulis, Irene L.
    Mt Sinai Hospital, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Anton-Culver, Hoda
    University of Calif Irvine, CA 92697 USA.
    Arndt, Volker
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Arun, Banu K.
    University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre, TX 77030 USA.
    Arver, Brita
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Barile, Monica
    Ist Europeo Oncol, Italy.
    Barkardottir, Rosa B.
    Landspitali University Hospital, Iceland; University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Barrowdale, Daniel
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Beckmann, Lars
    Institute Qual and Efficiency Health Care IQWiG, Germany.
    Beckmann, Matthias W.
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany.
    Benitez, Javier
    Spanish National Cancer Centre CNIO, Spain; Spanish National Cancer Centre CNIO, Spain; Biomed Network Rare Disease CIBERER, Spain.
    Blank, Stephanie V.
    NYU, NY 10016 USA.
    Blomqvist, Carl
    University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Bogdanova, Natalia V.
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Bojesen, Stig E.
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Bolla, Manjeet K.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Bonanni, Bernardo
    Ist Europeo Oncol, Italy.
    Brauch, Hiltrud
    Dr Margarete Fischer Bosch Institute Clin Pharmacol, Germany; University of Tubingen, Germany.
    Brenner, Hermann
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany; German Cancer Research Centre, Germany; National Centre Tumor Disease NCT, Germany.
    Burwinkel, Barbara
    Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Buys, Saundra S.
    University of Utah, UT 84112 USA.
    Caldes, Trinidad
    IdISSC, Spain.
    Caligo, Maria A.
    University of Pisa, Italy; University Hospital Pisa, Italy.
    Canzian, Federico
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Carpenter, Jane
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Chanock, Stephen J.
    NCI, MD 20850 USA.
    Chung, Wendy K.
    Columbia University, NY 10032 USA; Columbia University, NY 10032 USA.
    Claes, Kathleen B. M.
    University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Cox, Angela
    University of Sheffield, England.
    Cross, Simon S.
    University of Sheffield, England.
    Cunningham, Julie M.
    Mayo Clin, MN 55905 USA.
    Czene, Kamila
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Daly, Mary B.
    Fox Chase Cancer Centre, PA 19111 USA.
    Damiola, Francesca
    University of Lyon, France.
    Darabi, Hatef
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    de la Hoya, Miguel
    IdISSC, Spain.
    Devilee, Peter
    Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Diez, Orland
    University Hospital Vall dHebron, Spain; University of Autonoma Barcelona, Spain.
    Ding, Yuan C.
    City Hope National Medical Centre, CA 91010 USA.
    Dolcetti, Riccardo
    CRO Aviano National Cancer Institute, Italy.
    Domchek, Susan M.
    University of Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Dorfling, Cecilia M.
    University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel
    University of London London School Hyg and Trop Med, England.
    Dumont, Martine
    Centre Hospital University of Quebec, Canada; University of Laval, Canada.
    Dunning, Alison M.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Eccles, Diana M.
    University of Southampton, England.
    Ehrencrona, Hans
    Uppsala University, Sweden; University of Lund Hospital, Sweden.
    Ekici, Arif B.
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany; Comprehens Cancer Centre EMN, Germany.
    Eliassen, Heather
    Brigham and Womens Hospital, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA.
    Ellis, Steve
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Fasching, Peter A.
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany.
    Figueroa, Jonine
    NCI, MD 20850 USA.
    Flesch-Janys, Dieter
    University of Clin Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany; University of Clin Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany.
    Foersti, Asta
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany; Lund University, Sweden.
    Fostira, Florentia
    National Centre Science Research Demokritos, Greece.
    Foulkes, William D.
    McGill University, Canada.
    Friebel, Tara
    University of Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.
    Friedman, Eitan
    Chaim Sheba Medical Centre, Israel.
    Frost, Debra
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Gabrielson, Marike
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Gammon, Marilie D.
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    Ganz, Patricia A.
    Jonsson Comprehens Cancer Centre, CA 90095 USA; Jonsson Comprehens Cancer Centre, CA 90095 USA.
    Gapstur, Susan M.
    Amer Cancer Soc, GA 30303 USA.
    Garber, Judy
    Dana Farber Cancer Institute, MA 02215 USA.
    Gaudet, Mia M.
    Amer Cancer Soc, GA 30303 USA.
    Gayther, Simon A.
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA.
    Gerdes, Anne-Marie
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Ghoussaini, Maya
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Giles, Graham G.
    Cancer Council Victoria, Australia.
    Glendon, Gord
    Mt Sinai Hospital, Canada.
    Godwin, Andrew K.
    University of Kansas, KS 66205 USA.
    Goldberg, Mark S.
    McGill University, Canada; McGill University, Canada.
    Goldgar, David E.
    University of Utah, UT 84132 USA.
    Gonzalez-Neira, Anna
    Spanish National Cancer Research Centre CNIO, Spain.
    Greene, Mark H.
    NCI, MD 20850 USA.
    Gronwald, Jacek
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Guenel, Pascal
    CESP Centre Research Epidemiol and Populat Heatlh, France.
    Gunter, Marc
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Haeberle, Lothar
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany.
    Haiman, Christopher A.
    University of So Calif, CA 90033 USA.
    Hamann, Ute
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Hansen, Thomas V. O.
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Hart, Steven
    Mayo Clin, MN 55905 USA.
    Healey, Sue
    QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Australia.
    Heikkinen, Tuomas
    Heidelberg University, Germany; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Henderson, Brian E.
    University of So Calif, CA 90033 USA.
    Herzog, Josef
    City Hope Clin Cancer Genet Community Research Network, CA 91010 USA.
    Hogervorst, Frans B. L.
    Netherlands Cancer Institute, Netherlands.
    Hollestelle, Antoinette
    Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Netherlands.
    Hooning, Maartje J.
    Erasmus University, Netherlands.
    Hoover, Robert N.
    NCI, MD 20850 USA.
    Hopper, John L.
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Humphreys, Keith
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hunter, David J.
    Harvard University, MA 02115 USA.
    Huzarski, Tomasz
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Imyanitov, Evgeny N.
    NN Petrov Oncology Research Institute, Russia.
    Isaacs, Claudine
    Georgetown University, DC 20007 USA.
    Jakubowska, Anna
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    James, Paul
    Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Australia; University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Janavicius, Ramunas
    State Research Institute, Lithuania.
    Birk Jensen, Uffe
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    John, Esther M.
    Cancer Prevent Institute Calif, CA 94538 USA.
    Jones, Michael
    Institute Cancer Research, England.
    Kabisch, Maria
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Kar, Siddhartha
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Karlan, Beth Y.
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA.
    Khan, Sofia
    University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Kibriya, Muhammad G.
    University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Knight, Julia A.
    Mt Sinai Hospital, Canada.
    Ko, Yon-Dschun
    Evangel Kliniken Bonn gGmbH, Germany.
    Konstantopoulou, Irene
    National Centre Science Research Demokritos, Greece.
    Kosma, Veli-Matti
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Kristensen, Vessela
    Radiumhosp, Norway.
    Kwong, Ava
    Hong Kong Hereditary Breast Cancer Family Registry, Peoples R China; University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Laitman, Yael
    Chaim Sheba Medical Centre, Israel.
    Lambrechts, Diether
    VIB, Belgium.
    Lazaro, Conxi
    IDIBELL Catalan Institute Oncol, Spain.
    Lee, Eunjung
    University of So Calif, CA 90032 USA.
    Le Marchand, Loic
    University of Cancer Centre, HI 96813 USA.
    Lester, Jenny
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA.
    Lindblom, Annika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lindor, Noralane
    Mayo Clin, AZ 85259 USA.
    Lindstrom, Sara
    Harvard University, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA.
    Liu, Jianjun
    Genome Institute Singapore, Singapore.
    Long, Jirong
    Vanderbilt University, TN 37203 USA; Vanderbilt University, TN 37203 USA.
    Lubinski, Jan
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Mai, Phuong L.
    NCI, MD 20850 USA.
    Makalic, Enes
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Malone, Kathleen E.
    Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Centre, WA 98109 USA; University of Washington, WA 98195 USA.
    Mannermaa, Arto
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Manoukian, Siranoush
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori INT, Italy.
    Margolin, Sara
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Marme, Frederik
    Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Martens, John W. M.
    Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Netherlands.
    McGuffog, Lesley
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Meindl, Alfons
    Technical University of Munich, Germany.
    Miller, Austin
    Roswell Pk Cancer Institute, NY 14263 USA.
    Milne, Roger L.
    Cancer Council Victoria, Australia.
    Miron, Penelope
    Case Western Reserve University, OH 44106 USA.
    Montagna, Marco
    IRCCS, Italy.
    Mazoyer, Sylvie
    University of Lyon, France.
    Mulligan, Anna M.
    University of Health Network, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Muranen, Taru A.
    Heidelberg University, Germany; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Nathanson, Katherine L.
    University of Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Neuhausen, Susan L.
    City Hope National Medical Centre, CA 91010 USA.
    Nevanlinna, Heli
    University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Nordestgaard, Borge G.
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Nussbaum, Robert L.
    Invitae Corp, CA 94107 USA.
    Offit, Kenneth
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10065 USA.
    Olah, Edith
    National Institute Oncol, Hungary.
    Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.
    University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Olson, Janet E.
    Mayo Clin, MN 55905 USA.
    Osorio, Ana
    Spanish National Cancer Centre CNIO, Spain.
    Park, Sue K.
    Seoul National University, South Korea; Seoul National University, South Korea.
    Peeters, Petra H.
    University of Medical Centre, Netherlands; University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Peissel, Bernard
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori INT, Italy.
    Peterlongo, Paolo
    Fdn Ist FIRC Oncology Mol, Italy.
    Peto, Julian
    University of London London School Hyg and Trop Med, England.
    Phelan, Catherine M.
    University of S Florida, FL 33612 USA.
    Pilarski, Robert
    Ohio State University, OH 43210 USA.
    Poppe, Bruce
    University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Pylkaes, Katri
    University of Oulu, Finland; University of Oulu, Finland; University of Oulu, Finland.
    Radice, Paolo
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori INT, Italy.
    Rahman, Nazneen
    Institute Cancer Research, England.
    Rantala, Johanna
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Rappaport, Christine
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Rennert, Gad
    Clalit National Israeli Cancer Control Centre, Israel; Carmel Hospital, Israel; B Rappaport Fac Med, Israel.
    Richardson, Andrea
    Johns Hopkins University, MD 21205 USA.
    Robson, Mark
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10065 USA.
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Int Agency Research Canc, France.
    Rudolph, Anja
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Rutgers, Emiel J.
    Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Netherlands.
    Sanchez, Maria-Jose
    University of Granada, Spain; CIBER Epidemiol and Salud Public CIBERESP, Spain.
    Santella, Regina M.
    Columbia University, NY 10032 USA.
    Sawyer, Elinor J.
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Schmidt, Daniel F.
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Schmidt, Marjanka K.
    Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Netherlands.
    Schmutzler, Rita K.
    University Hospital Cologne, Germany; University Hospital Cologne, Germany.
    Schumacher, Fredrick
    University of So Calif, CA 90033 USA.
    Scott, Rodney
    John Hunter Hospital, Australia.
    Senter, Leigha
    Ohio State University, OH 43210 USA.
    Sharma, Priyanka
    University of Kansas, KS 66205 USA.
    Simard, Jacques
    University of Laval, Canada.
    Singer, Christian F.
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Sinilnikova, Olga M.
    University of Lyon, France; Hospital Civils Lyon, France.
    Soucy, Penny
    University of Laval, Canada.
    Southey, Melissa
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Steinemann, Doris
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk patologi och klinisk genetik.
    Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique
    Institute Curie, France; University of Paris 05, France.
    Swerdlow, Anthony
    Institute Cancer Research, England.
    Szabo, Csilla I.
    NHGRI, MD 20892 USA.
    Tamimi, Rulla
    Brigham and Womens Hospital, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA.
    Tapper, William
    University of Southampton, England.
    Teixeira, Manuel R.
    Portuguese Oncology Institute, Portugal; University of Porto, Portugal.
    Teo, Soo-Hwang
    Cancer Research Initiat Fdn, Malaysia; University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Terry, Mary B.
    Columbia University, NY 10032 USA.
    Thomassen, Mads
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Thompson, Deborah
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Tihomirova, Laima
    Latvian Biomed Research and Study Centre, Latvia.
    Toland, Amanda E.
    Ohio State University, OH 43210 USA.
    Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.
    Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Tomlinson, Ian
    University of Oxford, England; University of Oxford, England.
    Truong, Therese
    CESP Centre Research Epidemiol and Populat Heatlh, France.
    Tsimiklis, Helen
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Teule, Alex
    IDIBELL Catalan Institute Oncol, Spain.
    Tumino, Rosario
    Civ MP Arezzo Hospital, Italy; Civ MP Arezzo Hospital, Italy.
    Tung, Nadine
    Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre, MA 02215 USA.
    Turnbull, Clare
    Institute Cancer Research, England.
    Ursin, Giski
    Institute Populat Based Cancer Research, Norway.
    van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.
    Erasmus University, Netherlands.
    van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.
    University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda
    Charite, Germany.
    Wang, Zhaoming
    NCI, MD 20877 USA.
    Wang-Gohrke, Shan
    University Hospital Ulm, Germany.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Institute Populat Based Cancer Research, Norway; University of Tromso, Norway; Folkhalsan Research Centre, Finland.
    Weitzel, Jeffrey N.
    City Hope Clin Cancer Genet Community Research Network, CA 91010 USA.
    Whittemore, Alice
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Wildiers, Hans
    University Hospital, Belgium.
    Winqvist, Robert
    University of Oulu, Finland; University of Oulu, Finland; University of Oulu, Finland.
    Yang, Xiaohong R.
    NCI, MD 20892 USA.
    Yannoukakos, Drakoulis
    National Centre Science Research Demokritos, Greece.
    Yao, Song
    Department of Cancer Prevention and Control, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York, USA.
    Pilar Zamora, M.
    Hospital University of La Paz, Spain.
    Zheng, Wei
    Vanderbilt University, TN 37203 USA; Vanderbilt University, TN 37203 USA.
    Hall, Per
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kraft, Peter
    Harvard University, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA.
    Vachon, Celine
    Mayo Clin, MN 55905 USA.
    Slager, Susan
    Mayo Clin, MN 55905 USA.
    Chenevix-Trench, Georgia
    QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Australia.
    Pharoah, Paul D. P.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Monteiro, Alvaro A. N.
    University of S Florida, FL 33612 USA.
    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat
    NCI, MD 20850 USA.
    Easton, Douglas F.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Antoniou, Antonis C.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer2016Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 7, nr 11375, s. 1-13Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 x 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for similar to 11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction.

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  • 30.
    Cui, Yong
    et al.
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China; Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Yao, Huifeng
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Jianqi
    Natl Ctr Nanosci and Technol, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Tao
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Wang, Yuming
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biomolekylär och Organisk Elektronik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Hong, Ling
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China; Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Xian, Kaihu
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China; Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Xu, Bowei
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Shaoqing
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China; Univ Sci and Technol Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Peng, Jing
    Organtec Ltd, Peoples R China.
    Wei, Zhixiang
    Natl Ctr Nanosci and Technol, Peoples R China.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biomolekylär och Organisk Elektronik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Hou, Jianhui
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China; Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Over 16% efficiency organic photovoltaic cells enabled by a chlorinated acceptor with increased open-circuit voltages2019Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, artikel-id 2515Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Broadening the optical absorption of organic photovoltaic (OPV) materials by enhancing the intramolecular push-pull effect is a general and effective method to improve the power conversion efficiencies of OPV cells. However, in terms of the electron acceptors, the most common molecular design strategy of halogenation usually results in down-shifted molecular energy levels, thereby leading to decreased open-circuit voltages in the devices. Herein, we report a chlorinated non-fullerene acceptor, which exhibits an extended optical absorption and meanwhile displays a higher voltage than its fluorinated counterpart in the devices. This unexpected phenomenon can be ascribed to the reduced non-radiative energy loss (0.206 eV). Due to the simultaneously improved short-circuit current density and open-circuit voltage, a high efficiency of 16.5% is achieved. This study demonstrates that finely tuning the OPV materials to reduce the bandgap-voltage offset has great potential for boosting the efficiency.

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  • 31.
    DAddio, Francesca
    et al.
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Maestroni, Anna
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Assi, Emma
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Ben Nasr, Moufida
    Univ Milan, Italy; Harvard Med Sch, MA 02115 USA; Harvard Med Sch, MA 02115 USA.
    Amabile, Giovanni
    Enthera Srl, Italy.
    Usuelli, Vera
    Univ Milan, Italy; Harvard Med Sch, MA 02115 USA; Harvard Med Sch, MA 02115 USA.
    Loretelli, Cristian
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Bertuzzi, Federico
    ASST Grande Osped Metropolitano Niguarda, Italy.
    Antonioli, Barbara
    ASST Grande Osped Metropolitano Niguarda, Italy.
    Cardarelli, Francesco
    NEST Scuola Normale Super, Italy.
    El Essawy, Basset
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, MA 02115 USA; Al Azhar Univ, Egypt.
    Solini, Anna
    Univ Pisa, Italy.
    Gerling, Ivan C.
    Univ Tennessee, TN 38104 USA.
    Bianchi, Cristina
    Univ Pisa, Italy; Azienda Osped Univ Pisana, Italy.
    Becchi, Gabriella
    Univ Parma, Italy.
    Mazzucchelli, Serena
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Corradi, Domenico
    Univ Parma, Italy.
    Fadini, Gian Paolo
    Univ Padua, Italy.
    Foschi, Diego
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Markmann, James F.
    Harvard Med Sch, MA 02115 USA.
    Orsi, Emanuela
    IRCCS Ca Granda Osped Maggiore Policlin Fdn, Italy.
    Skrha, Jan
    Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic.
    Camboni, Maria Gabriella
    Enthera Srl, Italy.
    Abdi, Reza
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, MA 02115 USA.
    Shapiro, A. M. James
    Univ Alberta, Canada.
    Folli, Franco
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för barns och kvinnors hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Del Prato, Stefano
    Univ Pisa, Italy; Azienda Osped Univ Pisana, Italy.
    Zuccotti, Gianvincenzo
    Univ Milan, Italy; Buzzi Childrens Hosp, Italy.
    Fiorina, Paolo
    Univ Milan, Italy; Harvard Med Sch, MA 02115 USA; Harvard Med Sch, MA 02115 USA; ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, Italy.
    The IGFBP3/TMEM219 pathway regulates beta cell homeostasis2022Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 13, nr 1, artikel-id 684Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this new study the Authors demonstrated that the IGFBP3/TMEM219 pathway is a physiological regulator of pancreatic beta cell homeostasis and it is dysregulated in diabetes. IGFBP3/TMEM219 targeting may therefore serve as a therapeutic option in diabetes. Loss of pancreatic beta cells is a central feature of type 1 (T1D) and type 2 (T2D) diabetes, but a therapeutic strategy to preserve beta cell mass remains to be established. Here we show that the death receptor TMEM219 is expressed on pancreatic beta cells and that signaling through its ligand insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) leads to beta cell loss and dysfunction. Increased peripheral IGFBP3 was observed in established and at-risk T1D/T2D patients and was confirmed in T1D/T2D preclinical models, suggesting that dysfunctional IGFBP3/TMEM219 signaling is associated with abnormalities in beta cells homeostasis. In vitro and in vivo short-term IGFBP3/TMEM219 inhibition and TMEM219 genetic ablation preserved beta cells and prevented/delayed diabetes onset, while long-term IGFBP3/TMEM219 blockade allowed for beta cell expansion. Interestingly, in several patients cohorts restoration of appropriate IGFBP3 levels was associated with improved beta cell function. The IGFBP3/TMEM219 pathway is thus shown to be a physiological regulator of beta cell homeostasis and is also demonstrated to be disrupted in T1D/T2D. IGFBP3/TMEM219 targeting may therefore serve as a therapeutic option in diabetes.

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  • 32.
    Diener, Johanna
    et al.
    Univ Zurich, Switzerland.
    Baggiolini, Arianna
    Univ Zurich, Switzerland; Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, NY 10021 USA.
    Pernebrink, Mattias
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för molekylär medicin och virologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Dalcher, Damian
    Univ Zurich, Switzerland.
    Lerra, Luigi
    Univ Zurich, Switzerland.
    Cheng, Phil F.
    Univ Hosp Zurich, Switzerland.
    Varum, Sandra
    Univ Zurich, Switzerland.
    Hausel, Jessica
    Univ Zurich, Switzerland.
    Stierli, Salome
    Univ Zurich, Switzerland.
    Treier, Mathias
    Max Delbruck Ctr Mol Med, Germany; Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany.
    Studer, Lorenz
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, NY 10021 USA.
    Basler, Konrad
    Univ Zurich, Switzerland.
    Levesque, Mitchell P.
    Univ Hosp Zurich, Switzerland.
    Dummer, Reinhard
    Univ Hosp Zurich, Switzerland.
    Santoro, Raffaella
    Univ Zurich, Switzerland.
    Cantù, Claudio
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för molekylär medicin och virologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Univ Zurich, Switzerland.
    Sommer, Lukas
    Univ Zurich, Switzerland.
    Epigenetic control of melanoma cell invasiveness by the stem cell factor SALL42021Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 12, nr 1, artikel-id 5056Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Melanoma cells rely on developmental programs during tumor initiation and progression. Here we show that the embryonic stem cell (ESC) factor Sall4 is re-expressed in the Tyr::Nras(Q61K); Cdkn2a(-/-) melanoma model and that its expression is necessary for primary melanoma formation. Surprisingly, while Sall4 loss prevents tumor formation, it promotes micrometastases to distant organs in this melanoma-prone mouse model. Transcriptional profiling and in vitro assays using human melanoma cells demonstrate that SALL4 loss induces a phenotype switch and the acquisition of an invasive phenotype. We show that SALL4 negatively regulates invasiveness through interaction with the histone deacetylase (HDAC) 2 and direct co-binding to a set of invasiveness genes. Consequently, SALL4 knock down, as well as HDAC inhibition, promote the expression of an invasive signature, while inhibition of histone acetylation partially reverts the invasiveness program induced by SALL4 loss. Thus, SALL4 appears to regulate phenotype switching in melanoma through an HDAC2-mediated mechanism. Melanoma cells can switch between proliferative and invasive phenotypes. Here the authors show that the embryonic stem cell factor Sall4 is a negative regulator of melanoma phenotype switching where its loss leads to the acquisition of an invasive phenotype, due to derepression of invasiveness genes.

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  • 33.
    Drefahl, Sven
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Wallace, Matthew
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Mussino, Eleonora
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Aradhya, Siddartha
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Kolk, Martin
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden; Inst Futures Studies, Sweden.
    Brandén, Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Institutet för analytisk sociologi, IAS. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gunnar
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    A population-based cohort study of socio-demographic risk factors for COVID-19 deaths in Sweden2020Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 11, nr 1, artikel-id 5097Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    As global deaths from COVID-19 continue to rise, the worlds governments, institutions, and agencies are still working toward an understanding of who is most at risk of death. In this study, data on all recorded COVID-19 deaths in Sweden up to May 7, 2020 are linked to high-quality and accurate individual-level background data from administrative registers of the total population. By means of individual-level survival analysis we demonstrate that being male, having less individual income, lower education, not being married all independently predict a higher risk of death from COVID-19 and from all other causes of death. Being an immigrant from a low- or middle-income country predicts higher risk of death from COVID-19 but not for all other causes of death. The main message of this work is that the interaction of the virus causing COVID-19 and its social environment exerts an unequal burden on the most disadvantaged members of society. Better understanding of who is at highest risk of death from COVID-19 is important for public health planning. Here, the authors demonstrate an unequal mortality burden associated with socially disadvantaged groups in Sweden.

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  • 34.
    Dwivedi, Sanjiv
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Bioinformatik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Tjärnberg, Andreas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Bioinformatik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. NYU, NY 10003 USA.
    Tegner, Jesper
    King Abdullah Univ Sci & Technol KAUST, Saudi Arabia; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Sci Life Lab, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Mika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Bioinformatik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Deriving disease modules from the compressed transcriptional space embedded in a deep autoencoder2020Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 11, nr 1, artikel-id 856Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Disease modules in molecular interaction maps have been useful for characterizing diseases. Yet biological networks, that commonly define such modules are incomplete and biased toward some well-studied disease genes. Here we ask whether disease-relevant modules of genes can be discovered without prior knowledge of a biological network, instead training a deep autoencoder from large transcriptional data. We hypothesize that modules could be discovered within the autoencoder representations. We find a statistically significant enrichment of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) relevant genes in the last layer, and to a successively lesser degree in the middle and first layers respectively. In contrast, we find an opposite gradient where a modular protein-protein interaction signal is strongest in the first layer, but then vanishing smoothly deeper in the network. We conclude that a data-driven discovery approach is sufficient to discover groups of disease-related genes. The study of disease modules facilitates insight into complex diseases, but their identification relies on knowledge of molecular networks. Here, the authors show that disease modules and genes can also be discovered in deep autoencoder representations of large human gene expression datasets.

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  • 35.
    Eriksson, Daniel
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Royrvik, Ellen Christine
    Univ Bergen, Norway; Univ Bergen, Norway.
    Aranda-Guillen, Maribel
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Berger, Amund Holte
    Univ Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hosp, Norway.
    Landegren, Nils
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Artaza, Haydee
    Univ Bergen, Norway.
    Hallgren, Asa
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Grytaas, Marianne Aardal
    Univ Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hosp, Norway.
    Strom, Sara
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bratland, Eirik
    Univ Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hosp, Norway.
    Botusan, Ileana Ruxandra
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Oftedal, Bergithe Eikeland
    Univ Bergen, Norway; Univ Bergen, Norway.
    Breivik, Lars
    Univ Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hosp, Norway.
    Vaudel, Marc
    Univ Bergen, Norway.
    Helgeland, Oyvind
    Univ Bergen, Norway; Inst Publ Hlth, Norway.
    Falorni, Alberto
    Univ Perugia, Italy.
    Jorgensen, Anders Palmstrom
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Hulting, Anna-Lena
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Svartberg, Johan
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Norway; Univ Hosp North Norway, Norway.
    Ekwall, Olov
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fougner, Kristian Johan
    St Olavs Hosp, Norway.
    Wahlberg, Jeanette
    Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Medicincentrum, Endokrinmedicinska kliniken. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för diagnostik och specialistmedicin.
    Nedrebo, Bjorn Gunnar
    Univ Bergen, Norway; Haugesund Hosp, Norway.
    Dahlqvist, Per
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Knappskog, Per Morten
    Univ Bergen, Norway; Univ Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hosp, Norway.
    Wolff, Anette Susanne Boe
    Univ Bergen, Norway; Univ Bergen, Norway.
    Bensing, Sophie
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Johansson, Stefan
    Univ Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hosp, Norway.
    Kampe, Olle
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Univ Bergen, Norway; Univ Bergen, Norway; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Husebye, Eystein Sverre
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Univ Bergen, Norway; Univ Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hosp, Norway.
    GWAS for autoimmune Addisons disease identifies multiple risk loci and highlights AIRE in disease susceptibility2021Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 12, nr 1, artikel-id 959Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Autoimmune Addisons disease (AAD) is characterized by the autoimmune destruction of the adrenal cortex. Low prevalence and complex inheritance have long hindered successful genetic studies. We here report the first genome-wide association study on AAD, which identifies nine independent risk loci (P<5x10(-8)). In addition to loci implicated in lymphocyte function and development shared with other autoimmune diseases such as HLA, BACH2, PTPN22 and CTLA4, we associate two protein-coding alterations in Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) with AAD. The strongest, p.R471C (rs74203920, OR=3.4 (2.7-4.3), P=9.0x10(-25)) introduces an additional cysteine residue in the zinc-finger motif of the second PHD domain of the AIRE protein. This unbiased elucidation of the genetic contribution to development of AAD points to the importance of central immunological tolerance, and explains 35-41% of heritability (h(2)). Autoimmune Addisons disease is a rare complex disease, which has not yet been characterized by non-biased genetic studies. Here, the authors perform the first GWAS for the disease, identifying nine loci including two coding variants in the gene Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE).

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  • 36.
    Eriksson, Kimmo
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden; Malardalen Univ, Sweden.
    Strimling, Pontus
    Inst Futures Studies, Sweden.
    Gelfand, Michele
    Univ Maryland, MD 20742 USA.
    Wu, Junhui
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Abernathy, Jered
    Univ South Carolina, SC 29208 USA.
    Akotia, Charity S.
    Univ Ghana, Ghana.
    Aldashev, Alisher
    Satbayev Univ, Kazakhstan.
    Andersson, Per A
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Andrighetto, Giulia
    Malardalen Univ, Sweden; Inst Futures Studies, Sweden; Natl Res Council Italy, Italy.
    Anum, Adote
    Univ Ghana, Ghana.
    Arikan, Gizem
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Ireland.
    Aycan, Zeynep
    Koc Univ, Turkey.
    Bagherian, Fatemeh
    Shahid Beheshti Univ, Iran.
    Barrera, Davide
    Univ Turin, Italy; Coll Carlo Alberto, Italy.
    Basnight-Brown, Dana
    US Int Univ Africa, Kenya.
    Batkeyev, Birzhan
    Kazakh British Tech Univ, Kazakhstan.
    Belaus, Anabel
    Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn CONICET, Argentina; Univ Nacl Cordoba UNC, Argentina.
    Berezina, Elizaveta
    Sunway Univ, Malaysia.
    Bjornstjerna, Marie
    Inst Futures Studies, Sweden.
    Blumen, Sheyla
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Peru, Peru.
    Boski, Pawel
    SWPS Univ Social Sci & Humanities, Poland.
    Zeineddine, Fouad Bou
    Univ Innsbruck, Austria.
    Bovina, Inna
    Moscow State Univ Psychol & Educ, Russia.
    Thi Thu Huyen, Bui
    Hanoi Natl Univ Educ, Vietnam.
    Cardenas, Juan-Camilo
    Univ Los Andes, Colombia.
    Cekrlija, Dorde
    Univ Banja Luka, Bosnia & Herceg.
    Choi, Hoon-Seok
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Contreras-Ibanez, Carlos C.
    Univ Autonoma Metropolitana, Mexico.
    Costa-Lopes, Rui
    Univ Lisbon, Portugal.
    de Barra, Micheal
    Brunel Univ London, England.
    de Zoysa, Piyanjali
    Univ Colombo, Sri Lanka.
    Dorrough, Angela
    Univ Cologne, Germany.
    Dvoryanchikov, Nikolay
    Moscow State Univ Psychol & Educ, Russia.
    Eller, Anja
    Univ Nacl Autonoma Mexico, Mexico.
    Engelmann, Jan B.
    Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Euh, Hyun
    Univ Minnesota, MN 55455 USA.
    Fang, Xia
    York Univ, Canada.
    Fiedler, Susann
    Max Planck Inst Res Collect Goods, Germany.
    Foster-Gimbel, Olivia A.
    NYU, NY 10012 USA.
    Fulop, Marta
    Res Ctr Nat Sci, Hungary; Eotvos Lorand Univ, Hungary.
    Gardarsdottir, Ragna B.
    Univ Iceland, Iceland.
    Gill, C. M. Hew D.
    Sunway Univ, Malaysia.
    Glockner, Andreas
    Univ Cologne, Germany; Max Planck Inst Res Collect Goods, Germany.
    Graf, Sylvie
    Czech Acad Sci, Czech Republic.
    Grigoryan, Ani
    Yerevan State Univ, Armenia.
    Gritskov, Vladimir
    St Petersburg State Univ, Russia.
    Growiec, Katarzyna
    SWPS Univ Social Sci & Humanities, Poland.
    Halama, Peter
    Slovak Acad Sci, Slovakia.
    Hartanto, Andree
    Singapore Management Univ, Singapore.
    Hopthrow, Tim
    Univ Kent, England.
    Hrebickova, Martina
    Czech Acad Sci, Czech Republic.
    Ilisko, Dzintra
    Daugavpils Univ, Latvia.
    Imada, Hirotaka
    Univ Kent, England.
    Kapoor, Hansika
    Dept Psychol, India.
    Kawakami, Kerry
    York Univ, Canada.
    Khachatryan, Narine
    Yerevan State Univ, Armenia.
    Kharchenko, Natalia
    Kyiv Int Inst Sociol, Ukraine.
    Khoury, Ninetta
    Future Minds Gifted Ctr, Peru.
    Kiyonari, Toko
    Aoyama Gakuin Univ, Japan.
    Kohut, Michal
    Univ Trnava, Slovakia.
    Thuy Linh, Le
    Natl Econ Univ, Vietnam.
    Leslie, Lisa M.
    NYU, NY 10012 USA.
    Li, Yang
    Nagoya Univ, Japan; Univ Melbourne, Australia.
    Li, Norman P.
    Singapore Management Univ, Singapore.
    Li, Zhuo
    Univ Western Ontario, Canada.
    Liik, Kadi
    Tallinn Univ, Estonia.
    Maitner, Angela T.
    Amer Univ Sharjah, U Arab Emirates.
    Manhique, Bernardo
    Eduardo Mondlane Univ, Mozambique.
    Manley, Harry
    Chulalongkorn Univ, Thailand.
    Medhioub, Imed
    Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic Univ IMSIU, Saudi Arabia.
    Mentser, Sari
    Open Univ Israel, Israel.
    Mohammed, Linda
    Univ Trinidad & Tobago, Trinidad Tobago.
    Nejat, Pegah
    Shahid Beheshti Univ, Iran.
    Nipassa, Orlando
    Eduardo Mondlane Univ, Mozambique.
    Nussinson, Ravit
    Open Univ Israel, Israel; Univ Haifa, Israel.
    Onyedire, Nneoma G.
    Univ Nigeria Nsukka, Nigeria.
    Onyishi, Ike E.
    Univ Nigeria Nsukka, Nigeria.
    Ozden, Seniha
    Koc Univ, Turkey.
    Panagiotopoulou, Penny
    Univ Patras, Greece.
    Perez-Floriano, Lorena R.
    Univ Diego Portales, Chile.
    Persson, Minna S.
    Inst Futures Studies, Sweden.
    Pheko, Mpho
    Univ Botswana, Botswana.
    Pirttila-Backman, Anna-Maija
    Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Pogosyan, Marianna
    Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Raver, Jana
    Queens Univ, Canada.
    Reyna, Cecilia
    Univ Nacl Cordoba UNC, Argentina.
    Rodrigues, Ricardo Borges
    Inst Univ Lisboa ISCTE IUL, Portugal.
    Romano, Sara
    Univ Turin, Italy.
    Romero, Pedro P.
    Univ San Francisco Quito, Ecuador.
    Sakki, Inari
    Univ Eastern Finland, Finland.
    San Martin, Alvaro
    IESE Business Sch, Spain.
    Sherbaji, Sara
    Amer Univ Sharjah, U Arab Emirates.
    Shimizu, Hiroshi
    Kwansei Gakuin Univ, Japan.
    Simpson, Brent
    Univ South Carolina, SC 29208 USA.
    Szabo, Erna
    Johannes Kepler Univ Linz, Austria.
    Takemura, Kosuke
    Shiga Univ, Japan.
    Tieffi, Hassan
    Univ Felix Houphouet Boigny Cocody Abidjan, Cote Ivoire.
    Teixeira, Maria Luisa Mendes
    Univ Prebiteriana Mackenzie, Brazil.
    Thanomkul, Napoj
    Chulalongkorn Univ, Thailand.
    Tiliouine, Habib
    Univ Oran 2, Algeria.
    Travaglino, Giovanni A.
    Univ Kent, England; Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Tsirbas, Yannis
    Univ Athens, Greece.
    Wan, Richard
    Johannes Kepler Univ Linz, Austria.
    Widodo, Sita
    Univ Airlangga, Indonesia.
    Zein, Rizqy
    Univ Airlangga, Indonesia.
    Zhang, Qing-peng
    Guangzhou Univ, Peoples R China.
    Zirganou-Kazolea, Lina
    Univ Athens, Greece.
    Van Lange, Paul A. M.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Perceptions of the appropriate response to norm violation in 57 societies2021Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 12, nr 1, artikel-id 1481Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Norm enforcement may be important for resolving conflicts and promoting cooperation. However, little is known about how preferred responses to norm violations vary across cultures and across domains. In a preregistered study of 57 countries (using convenience samples of 22,863 students and non-students), we measured perceptions of the appropriateness of various responses to a violation of a cooperative norm and to atypical social behaviors. Our findings highlight both cultural universals and cultural variation. We find a universal negative relation between appropriateness ratings of norm violations and appropriateness ratings of responses in the form of confrontation, social ostracism and gossip. Moreover, we find the country variation in the appropriateness of sanctions to be consistent across different norm violations but not across different sanctions. Specifically, in those countries where use of physical confrontation and social ostracism is rated as less appropriate, gossip is rated as more appropriate. Little is known about peoples preferred responses to norm violations across countries. Here, in a study of 57 countries, the authors highlight cultural similarities and differences in peoples perception of the appropriateness of norm violations.

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  • 37.
    Fonseca, Gregory J
    et al.
    Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA.
    Tao, Jenhan
    Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA.
    Westin, Emma M
    Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA.
    Duttke, Sascha H
    Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA.
    Spann, Nathanael J
    Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA.
    Strid, Tobias
    Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA.
    Shen, Zeyang
    Department of Bioengineering, Jacobs School of Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA.
    Stender, Joshua D
    Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA.
    Sakai, Mashito
    Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA.
    Link, Verena M
    Faculty of Biology, Division of Evolutionary Biology, Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich, Munich, 80539, Germany.
    Benner, Christopher
    Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA.
    Glass, Christopher K
    Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA // Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA.
    Diverse motif ensembles specify non-redundant DNA binding activities of AP-1 family members in macrophages.2019Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, nr 1, artikel-id 414Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Mechanisms by which members of the AP-1 family of transcription factors play non-redundant biological roles despite recognizing the same DNA sequence remain poorly understood. To address this question, here we investigate the molecular functions and genome-wide DNA binding patterns of AP-1 family members in primary and immortalized mouse macrophages. ChIP-sequencing shows overlapping and distinct binding profiles for each factor that were remodeled following TLR4 ligation. Development of a machine learning approach that jointly weighs hundreds of DNA recognition elements yields dozens of motifs predicted to drive factor-specific binding profiles. Machine learning-based predictions are confirmed by analysis of the effects of mutations in genetically diverse mice and by loss of function experiments. These findings provide evidence that non-redundant genomic locations of different AP-1 family members in macrophages largely result from collaborative interactions with diverse, locus-specific ensembles of transcription factors and suggest a general mechanism for encoding functional specificities of their common recognition motif.

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  • 38.
    Forchheimer, Daniel
    et al.
    Royal Institute Technology KTH, Sweden.
    Forchheimer, Robert
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för systemteknik, Informationskodning. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Haviland, David B.
    Royal Institute Technology KTH, Sweden.
    Improving image contrast and material discrimination with nonlinear response in bimodal atomic force microscopy2015Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 6, nr 6270Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Atomic force microscopy has recently been extented to bimodal operation, where increased image contrast is achieved through excitation and measurement of two cantilever eigen-modes. This enhanced material contrast is advantageous in analysis of complex heterogeneous materials with phase separation on the micro or nanometre scale. Here we show that much greater image contrast results from analysis of nonlinear response to the bimodal drive, at harmonics and mixing frequencies. The amplitude and phase of up to 17 frequencies are simultaneously measured in a single scan. Using a machine-learning algorithm we demonstrate almost threefold improvement in the ability to separate material components of a polymer blend when including this nonlinear response. Beyond the statistical analysis performed here, analysis of nonlinear response could be used to obtain quantitative material properties at high speeds and with enhanced resolution.

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  • 39.
    Franco, Irene
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Johansson, Anna
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Olsson, Karl
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Vrtacnik, Peter
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lundin, Par
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Helgadottir, Hafdis T.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Larsson, Malin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Bioinformatik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Revechon, Gwladys
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bosia, Carla
    IIGM, Italy; Politecn Torino, Italy.
    Pagnani, Andrea
    IIGM, Italy; Politecn Torino, Italy.
    Provero, Paolo
    Mol Biotechnol Ctr, Italy; Ist Sci San Raffaele, Italy.
    Gustafsson, Thomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Fischer, Helene
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Maria
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Somatic mutagenesis in satellite cells associates with human skeletal muscle aging2018Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, artikel-id 800Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Human aging is associated with a decline in skeletal muscle (SkM) function and a reduction in the number and activity of satellite cells (SCs), the resident stem cells. To study the connection between SC aging and muscle impairment, we analyze the whole genome of single SC clones of the leg muscle vastus lateralis from healthy individuals of different ages (21-78 years). We find an accumulation rate of 13 somatic mutations per genome per year, consistent with proliferation of SCs in the healthy adult muscle. SkM-expressed genes are protected from mutations, but aging results in an increase in mutations in exons and promoters, targeting genes involved in SC activity and muscle function. In agreement with SC mutations affecting the whole tissue, we detect a missense mutation in a SC propagating to the muscle. Our results suggest somatic mutagenesis in SCs as a driving force in the age-related decline of SkM function.

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  • 40.
    Gillett, Alexander J.
    et al.
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Tonnele, Claire
    Donostia Int Phys Ctr DIPC, Spain.
    Londi, Giacomo
    Univ Mons, Belgium.
    Ricci, Gaetano
    Univ Namur, Belgium; Univ Namur, Belgium.
    Catherin, Manon
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Unson, Darcy M. L.
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Casanova, David
    Donostia Int Phys Ctr DIPC, Spain.
    Castet, Frederic
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Olivier, Yoann
    Univ Namur, Belgium; Univ Namur, Belgium.
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Elektroniska och fotoniska material. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Zaborova, Elena
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Evans, Emrys W.
    Univ Cambridge, England; Swansea Univ, Wales.
    Drummond, Bluebell H.
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Conaghan, Patrick J.
    Univ Cambridge, England; Univ Sydney, Australia.
    Cui, Lin-Song
    Univ Cambridge, England; Univ Sci & Technol China, Peoples R China.
    Greenham, Neil C.
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Puttisong, Yuttapoom
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Elektroniska och fotoniska material. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Fages, Frederic
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Beljonne, David
    Univ Mons, Belgium.
    Friend, Richard H.
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Spontaneous exciton dissociation enables spin state interconversion in delayed fluorescence organic semiconductors2021Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 12, nr 1, artikel-id 6640Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering a low singlet-triplet energy gap (Delta E-ST) is necessary for efficient reverse intersystem crossing (rISC) in delayed fluorescence (DF) organic semiconductors but results in a small radiative rate that limits performance in LEDs. Here, we study a model DF material, BF2, that exhibits a strong optical absorption (absorption coefficient = 3.8 x 10(5) cm(-1)) and a relatively large Delta E-ST of 0.2 eV. In isolated BF2 molecules, intramolecular rISC is slow (delayed lifetime = 260 mu s), but in aggregated films, BF2 generates intermolecular charge transfer (inter-CT) states on picosecond timescales. In contrast to the microsecond intramolecular rISC that is promoted by spin-orbit interactions in most isolated DF molecules, photoluminescence-detected magnetic resonance shows that these inter-CT states undergo rISC mediated by hyperfine interactions on a similar to 24 ns timescale and have an average electron-hole separation of >= 1.5 nm. Transfer back to the emissive singlet exciton then enables efficient DF and LED operation. Thus, access to these inter-CT states, which is possible even at low BF2 doping concentrations of 4 wt%, resolves the conflicting requirements of fast radiative emission and low Delta E-ST in organic DF emitters.

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  • 41.
    Gilljam, David
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Teoretisk Biologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Curtsdotter, Alva
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Teoretisk Biologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Ebenman, Bo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Teoretisk Biologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Adaptive rewiring aggravates the effects of species loss in ecosystems2015Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 6, artikel-id 8412Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Loss of one species in an ecosystem can trigger extinctions of other dependent species. For instance, specialist predators will go extinct following the loss of their only prey unless they can change their diet. It has therefore been suggested that an ability of consumers to rewire to novel prey should mitigate the consequences of species loss by reducing the risk of cascading extinction. Using a new modelling approach on natural and computer-generated food webs we find that, on the contrary, rewiring often aggravates the effects of species loss. This is because rewiring can lead to overexploitation of resources, which eventually causes extinction cascades. Such a scenario is particularly likely if prey species cannot escape predation when rare and if predators are efficient in exploiting novel prey. Indeed, rewiring is a two-edged sword; it might be advantageous for individual predators in the short term, yet harmful for long-term system persistence.

  • 42.
    Giovanni, David
    et al.
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore; Energy Res Inst NTU ERI N, Singapore.
    Lim, Jia Wei Melvin
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore.
    Yuan, Zhongcheng
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biomolekylär och Organisk Elektronik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Lim, Swee Sien
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore.
    Righetto, Marcello
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore.
    Qing, Jian
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biomolekylär och Organisk Elektronik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Zhang, Qiannan
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore.
    Dewi, Herlina Arianita
    Energy Res Inst NTU ERI N, Singapore.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biomolekylär och Organisk Elektronik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Mhaisalkar, Subodh Gautam
    Energy Res Inst NTU ERI N, Singapore; Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore.
    Mathews, Nripan
    Energy Res Inst NTU ERI N, Singapore; Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore.
    Sum, Tze Chien
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore.
    Ultrafast long-range spin-funneling in solution-processed Ruddlesden-Popper halide perovskites2019Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, artikel-id 3456Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Room-temperature spin-based electronics is the vision of spintronics. Presently, there are few suitable material systems. Herein, we reveal that solution-processed mixed-phase Ruddlesden-Popper perovskite thin-films transcend the challenges of phonon momentum-scattering that limits spin-transfer in conventional semiconductors. This highly disordered system exhibits a remarkable efficient ultrafast funneling of photoexcited spin-polarized excitons from two-dimensional (2D) to three-dimensional (3D) phases at room temperature. We attribute this efficient exciton relaxation pathway towards the lower energy states to originate from the energy transfer mediated by intermediate states. This process bypasses the omnipresent phonon momentum-scattering in typical semiconductors with stringent band dispersion, which causes the loss of spin information during thermalization. Film engineering using graded 2D/3D perovskites allows unidirectional out-of-plane spin-funneling over a thickness of similar to 600 nm. Our findings reveal an intriguing family of solution-processed perovskites with extraordinary spin-preserving energy transport properties that could reinvigorate the concepts of spin-information transfer.

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  • 43.
    Gorinski, Nataliya
    et al.
    Cellular Neurophysiology, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg Str. 1, 30625, Hannover, Germany.
    Bijata, Monika
    Cellular Neurophysiology, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg Str. 1, 30625, Hannover, Germany / Cell Biophysics, Nencki Institute, Pasteur Str. 3, 02-093, Warsaw, Poland.
    Prasad, Sonal
    Cellular Neurophysiology, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg Str. 1, 30625, Hannover, Germany.
    Wirth, Alexander
    Cellular Neurophysiology, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg Str. 1, 30625, Hannover, Germany.
    Abdel Galil, Dalia
    Cellular Neurophysiology, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg Str. 1, 30625, Hannover, Germany.
    Zeug, Andre
    Cellular Neurophysiology, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg Str. 1, 30625, Hannover, German.
    Bazovkina, Daria
    Behavioural Neurogenomics, Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Novosibirsk, 630090, Russia.
    Kondaurova, Elena
    Behavioural Neurogenomics, Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Novosibirsk, 630090, Russia.
    Kulikova, Elizabeth
    Behavioural Neurogenomics, Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Novosibirsk, 630090, Russia.
    Ilchibaeva, Tatiana
    Behavioural Neurogenomics, Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Novosibirsk, 630090, Russia.
    Zareba-Koziol, Monika
    Cell Biophysics, Nencki Institute, Pasteur Str. 3, 02-093, Warsaw, Poland.
    Papaleo, Francesco
    Neuroscience and Brain Technologies, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, 16163, Genova, Italy.
    Scheggia, Diego
    Neuroscience and Brain Technologies, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, 16163, Genova, Italy.
    Kochlamazashvili, Gaga
    Neuroscience and Brain Technologies, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, 16163, Genova, Italy.
    Dityatev, Alexander
    Neuroscience and Brain Technologies, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, 16163, Genova, Italy / Molecular Neuroplasticity, DZNE, Leipziger Str. 44, 39120, Magdeburg, Germany.
    Smyth, Ian
    Anatomy & Developmental Biology, Monash University, 3800, Melbourne, Australia.
    Krzystyniak, Adam
    Cell Biophysics, Nencki Institute, Pasteur Str. 3, 02-093, Warsaw, Poland.
    Wlodarczyk, Jakub
    Cell Biophysics, Nencki Institute, Pasteur Str. 3, 02-093, Warsaw, Poland.
    Richter, Diethelm W.
    Neuro and Sensory Physiology, University of Göttingen, 37073, Göttingen, Germany.
    Strekalova, Tatyana
    Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow, Russia / Neuroscience, Maastricht University, 6229 ER, Maastricht, Netherlands / Laboratory of Psychiatric Neurobiology and Institute of General Pathology and Pathophysiology, Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Trubetskaya 8, 119315, Moscow, Russia.
    Sigrist, Stephan
    Institute of Biology, Free University Berlin, Takustr. 6, 14195, Berlin, Germany.
    Bang, Claudia
    Institute of Molecular and Translational Therapeutic Strategies, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg Str. 1, 30625, Hannover, Germany.
    Hobuß, Lisa
    Institute of Molecular and Translational Therapeutic Strategies, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg Str. 1, 30625, Hannover, Germany.
    Fiedler, Jan
    Institute of Molecular and Translational Therapeutic Strategies, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg Str. 1, 30625, Hannover, Germany.
    Thum, Thomas
    Institute of Molecular and Translational Therapeutic Strategies, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg Str. 1, 30625, Hannover, Germany.
    Naumenko, Vladimir S.
    Behavioural Neurogenomics, Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Novosibirsk, 630090, Russia.
    Pandey, Ghanshyam
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Illinois, 1601 W. Taylor Street, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA.
    Ponimaskin, Evgeni
    Cellular Neurophysiology, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg Str. 1, 30625, Hannover, Germany.
    Attenuated palmitoylation of serotonin receptor 5-HT1A affects receptor function and contributes to depression-like behaviors2019Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, nr 1, s. 1-14, artikel-id 3924Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The serotonergic system and in particular serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT1AR) are implicated in major depressive disorder (MDD). Here we demonstrated that 5-HT1AR is palmitoylated in human and rodent brains, and identified ZDHHC21 as a major palmitoyl acyltransferase, whose depletion reduced palmitoylation and consequently signaling functions of 5-HT1AR. Two rodent models for depression-like behavior show reduced brain ZDHHC21 expression and attenuated 5-HT1AR palmitoylation. Moreover, selective knock-down of ZDHHC21 in the murine forebrain induced depression-like behavior. We also identified the microRNA miR-30e as a negative regulator of Zdhhc21 expression. Through analysis of the post-mortem brain samples in individuals with MDD that died by suicide we find that miR-30e expression is increased, while ZDHHC21 expression, as well as palmitoylation of 5-HT1AR, are reduced within the prefrontal cortex. Our study suggests that downregulation of 5-HT1AR palmitoylation is a mechanism involved in depression, making the restoration of 5-HT1AR palmitoylation a promising clinical strategy for the treatment of MDD.

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    Attenuated palmitoylation of serotonin receptor 5-HT1A affects receptor function and contributes to depression-like behaviors
  • 44.
    Grilli, Jacopo
    et al.
    Univ Chicago, USA.
    Adorisio, Matteo
    Scuola Int Super Studi Avanzati, SISSA, Italy.
    Suweis, Samir
    Univ Padua,Italy; CNISM, Italy.
    Barabas, Gyorgy
    Univ Chicago, USA.
    Banavar, Jayanth R.
    Univ Maryland, USA.
    Allesina, Stefano
    Univ Chicago, USA; Northwestern Univ, USA.
    Maritan, Amos
    Univ Padua, Italy; CNISM, Italy.
    Correction: Feasibility and coexistence of large ecological communities (vol 8, pg 14389, 2017)2018Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, artikel-id 16228Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
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  • 45.
    Grilli, Jacopo
    et al.
    Univ Chicago, USA.
    Adorisio, Matteo
    Scuola Int Super Studi Avanzati, SISSA, Italy.
    Suweis, Samir
    Univ Padua, Italy; CNISM, Italy.
    Barabas, Gyorgy
    Univ Chicago, USA.
    Banavar, Jayanth R.
    Univ Maryland, USA.
    Allesina, Stefano
    Univ Chicago, USA; Northwestern Univ, USA.
    Maritan, Amos
    Univ Padua, Italy; CNISM, Italy.
    Feasibility and coexistence of large ecological communities2017Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, artikel-id 14389Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of species interactions in controlling the interplay between the stability of ecosystems and their biodiversity is still not well understood. The ability of ecological communities to recover after small perturbations of the species abundances (local asymptotic stability) has been well studied, whereas the likelihood of a community to persist when the conditions change (structural stability) has received much less attention. Our goal is to understand the effects of diversity, interaction strengths and ecological network structure on the volume of parameter space leading to feasible equilibria. We develop a geometrical framework to study the range of conditions necessary for feasible coexistence. We show that feasibility is determined by few quantities describing the interactions, yielding a nontrivial complexity-feasibility relationship. Analysing more than 100 empirical networks, we show that the range of coexistence conditions in mutualistic systems can be analytically predicted. Finally, we characterize the geometric shape of the feasibility domain, thereby identifying the direction of perturbations that are more likely to cause extinctions.

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  • 46.
    Grilli, Jacopo
    et al.
    Univ Chicago, USA.
    Barabas, Gyorgy
    Univ Chicago, USA.
    Michalska-Smith, Matthew J.
    Univ Chicago, USA.
    Allesina, Stefano
    Univ Chicago, USA; Northwestern Univ, USA.
    Higher-order interactions stabilize dynamics in competitive network models2017Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 548, nr 7666, s. 210-+Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecologists have long sought a way to explain how the remarkable biodiversity observed in nature is maintained. On the one hand, simple models of interacting competitors cannot produce the stable persistence of very large ecological communities(1-5). On the other hand, neutral models(6-9), in which species do not interact and diversity is maintained by immigration and speciation, yield unrealistically small fluctuations in population abundance(10), and a strong positive correlation between a species' abundance and its age(11), contrary to empirical evidence. Models allowing for the robust persistence of large communities of interacting competitors are lacking. Here we show that very diverse communities could persist thanks to the stabilizing role of higher-order interactions(12,13), in which the presence of a species influences the interaction between other species. Although higher-order interactions have been studied for decades(14-16), their role in shaping ecological communities is still unclear(5). The inclusion of higher-order interactions in competitive network models stabilizes dynamics, making species coexistence robust to the perturbation of both population abundance and parameter values. We show that higher-order interactions have strong effects in models of closed ecological communities, as well as of open communities in which new species are constantly introduced. In our framework, higher-order interactions are completely defined by pairwise interactions, facilitating empirical parameterization and validation of our models.

  • 47.
    Gulka, Michal
    et al.
    Hasselt Univ, Belgium; Czech Tech Univ, Czech Republic; Czech Acad Sci, Czech Republic.
    Wirtitsch, Daniel
    Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Ivady, Viktor
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Wigner Res Ctr Phys, Hungary.
    Vodnik, Jelle
    Hasselt Univ, Belgium; IMEC, Belgium.
    Hruby, Jaroslav
    Hasselt Univ, Belgium; IMEC, Belgium.
    Magchiels, Goele
    Hasselt Univ, Belgium.
    Bourgeois, Emilie
    Hasselt Univ, Belgium.
    Gali, Adam
    Wigner Res Ctr Phys, Hungary; Budapest Univ Technol & Econ, Hungary.
    Trupke, Michael
    Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Nesladek, Milos
    Hasselt Univ, Belgium; Czech Tech Univ, Czech Republic; IMEC, Belgium.
    Room-temperature control and electrical readout of individual nitrogen-vacancy nuclear spins2021Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 12, nr 1, artikel-id 4421Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Nuclear spins in semiconductors are leading candidates for future quantum technologies, including quantum computation, communication, and sensing. Nuclear spins in diamond are particularly attractive due to their long coherence time. With the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre, such nuclear qubits benefit from an auxiliary electronic qubit, which, at cryogenic temperatures, enables probabilistic entanglement mediated optically by photonic links. Here, we demonstrate a concept of a microelectronic quantum device at ambient conditions using diamond as wide bandgap semiconductor. The basic quantum processor unit - a single N-14 nuclear spin coupled to the NV electron - is read photoelectrically and thus operates in a manner compatible with nanoscale electronics. The underlying theory provides the key ingredients for photoelectric quantum gate operations and readout of nuclear qubit registers. This demonstration is, therefore, a step towards diamond quantum devices with a readout area limited by inter-electrode distance rather than by the diffraction limit. Such scalability could enable the development of electronic quantum processors based on the dipolar interaction of spin-qubits placed at nanoscopic proximity. Nuclear spins in diamond are promising for applications in quantum technologies due to their long coherence times. Here, the authors demonstrate a scalable electrical readout of individual intrinsic N-14 nuclear spins in diamond, mediated by hyperfine coupling to electron spin of the NV center, as a step towards room-temperature nanoscale diamond quantum devices.

  • 48.
    Guo, Yuwei
    et al.
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Apergi, Sofia
    Eindhoven Univ Technol, Netherlands.
    Li, Nan
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Chen, Mengyu
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China; Xiamen Univ, Peoples R China.
    Yin, Chunyang
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Elektroniska och fotoniska material. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Yuan, Zhongcheng
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Elektroniska och fotoniska material. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Elektroniska och fotoniska material. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Xie, Fangyan
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Peoples R China.
    Brocks, Geert
    Eindhoven Univ Technol, Netherlands; Eindhoven Univ Technol, Netherlands; Univ Twente, Netherlands; Univ Twente, Netherlands.
    Tao, Shuxia
    Eindhoven Univ Technol, Netherlands; Eindhoven Univ Technol, Netherlands.
    Zhao, Ni
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Phenylalkylammonium passivation enables perovskite light emitting diodes with record high-radiance operational lifetime: the chain length matters2021Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 12, nr 1, artikel-id 644Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Perovskite light emitting diodes suffer from poor operational stability, exhibiting a rapid decay of external quantum efficiency within minutes to hours after turn-on. To address this issue, we explore surface treatment of perovskite films with phenylalkylammonium iodide molecules of varying alkyl chain lengths. Combining experimental characterization and theoretical modelling, we show that these molecules stabilize the perovskite through suppression of iodide ion migration. The stabilization effect is enhanced with increasing chain length due to the stronger binding of the molecules with the perovskite surface, as well as the increased steric hindrance to reconfiguration for accommodating ion migration. The passivation also reduces the surface defects, resulting in a high radiance and delayed roll-off of external quantum efficiency. Using the optimized passivation molecule, phenylpropylammonium iodide, we achieve devices with an efficiency of 17.5%, a radiance of 1282.8 W sr(-1) m(-2) and a record T-50 half-lifetime of 130h under 100mAcm(-2). Perovskite light emitting diodes suffer from operational stability, showing rapid decay of performance within minutes to hours after turn-on. Here, the authors investigate how the steric and Coulomb interaction of ammonium passivation molecules with varying alkyl chain length can improve device stability by suppressing iodide ion migration.

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  • 49.
    Hakizimana, Pierre
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet / Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brownell, William E
    Jacob, Stefan
    Fridberger, Anders
    Karolinska Institutet / Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sound-induced length changes in outer hair cell stereocilia2012Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 3Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Hearing relies on mechanical stimulation of stereocilia bundles on the sensory cells of the inner ear. When sound hits the ear, each stereocilium pivots about a neck-like taper near their base. More than three decades of research have established that sideways deflection of stereocilia is essential for converting mechanical stimuli into electrical signals. Here we show that mammalian outer hair cell stereocilia not only move sideways but also change length during sound stimulation. Currents that enter stereocilia through mechanically sensitive ion channels control the magnitude of both length changes and bundle deflections in a reciprocal manner: the smaller the length change, the larger is the bundle deflection. Thus, the transduction current is important for maintaining the resting mechanical properties of stereocilia. Hair cell stimulation is most effective when bundles are in a state that ensures minimal length change.

  • 50.
    Hakizimana, Pierre
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för neurobiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Fridberger, Anders
    Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för neurobiologi.
    Inner hair cell stereocilia are embedded in the tectorial membrane2021Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 12, artikel-id 2604Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Mammalian hearing depends on sound-evoked displacements of the stereocilia of inner hair cells (IHCs), which cause the endogenous mechanoelectrical transducer channels to conduct inward currents of cations including Ca2+. Due to their presumed lack of contacts with the overlaying tectorial membrane (TM), the putative stimulation mechanism for these stereocilia is by means of the viscous drag of the surrounding endolymph. However, despite numerous efforts to characterize the TM by electron microscopy and other techniques, the exact IHC stereocilia-TM relationship remains elusive. Here we show that Ca2+-rich filamentous structures, that we call Ca2+ ducts, connect the TM to the IHC stereocilia to enable mechanical stimulation by the TM while also ensuring the stereocilia access to TM Ca2+. Our results call for a reassessment of the stimulation mechanism for the IHC stereocilia and the TM role in hearing.

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