liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Berg, Ina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Thor, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Developmental Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Efficient imaging of amyloid deposits in Drosophila models of human amyloidoses2010In: Nature Protocols, ISSN 1754-2189, E-ISSN 1750-2799, Vol. 5, no 5, p. 935-944Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drosophila melanogaster is emerging as an important model system for neurodegenerative disease research. In this protocol, we describe an efficient method for imaging amyloid deposits in the Drosophila brain, by the use of a luminescent-conjugated oligothiophene (lco), p-Ftaa polymer probe. We also demonstrate the feasibility of co-staining with antibodies and compare the lco staining with standard amyloid-specific probes. the lco protocol enables high-resolution imaging of several different protein aggregates, such as aβ1-42, aβ1-42e22G, transthyretin V30M and human tau, in the Drosophila brain. aβ and tau aggregates could also be distinguished from each other because of distinct lco emission spectra. Furthermore, this protocol enables threedimensional brain mapping of amyloid distribution in whole-mount Drosophila brains. the use of p-Ftaa combined with other probes, antibodies and/or dyes will aid the rapid characterization of various amyloid deposits in the rapidly growing number of Drosophila models of neurodegenerative diseases.

  • 2.
    Cao, Ziquan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Rouhi, Pegah
    Karolinska Institute.
    Hosaka, Kayoko
    Karolinska Institute.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Steffensen, John F
    University of Copenhagen.
    Wahlberg, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Vascular surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Cao, Yihai
    Karolinska Institute.
    Hypoxia-induced retinopathy model in adult zebrafish2010In: Nature Protocols, ISSN 1754-2189, E-ISSN 1750-2799, Vol. 5, no 12, p. 1903-1910Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypoxia-induced vascular responses, including angiogenesis, vascular remodeling and vascular leakage, significantly contribute to the onset, development and progression of retinopathy. However, until recently there were no appropriate animal disease models recapitulating adult retinopathy available. In this article, we describe protocols that create hypoxia-induced retinopathy in adult zebrafish. Adult fli1: EGFP zebrafish are placed in hypoxic water for 3-10 d and retinal neovascularization is analyzed using confocal microscopy. It usually takes 11 d to obtain conclusive results using the hypoxia-induced retinopathy model in adult zebrafish. This model provides a unique opportunity to study kinetically the development of retinopathy in adult animals using noninvasive protocols and to assess therapeutic efficacy of orally active antiangiogenic drugs.

  • 3.
    Lim, Sharon
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Honek, Jennifer
    Karolinska Institute.
    Xue, Yuan
    Karolinska Institute.
    Seki, Takahiro
    Karolinska Institute.
    Cao, Ziquan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Patrik
    Karolinska Institute.
    Yang, Xiaojuan
    Karolinska Institute.
    Hosaka, Kayoko
    Karolinska Institute.
    Cao, Yihai
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cold-induced activation of brown adipose tissue and adipose angiogenesis in mice2012In: Nature Protocols, ISSN 1754-2189, E-ISSN 1750-2799, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 606-615Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exposure of humans and rodents to cold activates thermogenic activity in brown adipose tissue (BAT). This protocol describes a mouse model to study the activation of BAT and angiogenesis in adipose tissues by cold acclimation. After a 1-week exposure to 4 degrees C, adult C57BL/6 mice show an obvious transition from subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT) into brown-like adipose tissue (BRITE). The BRITE phenotype persists after continuous cold exposure, and by the end of week 5 BRITE contains a high number of uncoupling protein-1-positive mitochondria, a characteristic feature of BAT. During the transition from WAT into BRITE, the vascular density is markedly increased owing to the activation of angiogenesis. In BAT, cold exposure stimulates thermogenesis by increasing the mitochondrial content and metabolic rate. BAT and the increased metabolic rate result in a lean phenotype. This protocol provides an outstanding opportunity to study the molecular mechanisms that control adipose mass.

  • 4.
    Neng, Lingling
    et al.
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, USA.
    Zhang, Wenjing
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, USA.
    Hassan, Ahmed
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, California, USA.
    Zemla, Marcin
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, California, USA.
    Kachelmeier, Allan
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, USA.
    Fridberger, Anders
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Auer, Manfred
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, California, USA.
    Shi, Xiaorui
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, USA.
    Isolation and culture of endothelial cells, pericytes and perivascular resident macrophage-like melanocytes from the young mouse ear2013In: Nature Protocols, ISSN 1754-2189, E-ISSN 1750-2799, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 709-720Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This protocol describes a growth medium-based approach for obtaining cochlear endothelial cells (ECs), pericytes (PCs) and perivascular resident macrophage-like melanocytes (PVM/Ms) from the stria vascularis of mice aged between P10 and P15 (P, postnatal day). The procedure does not involve mechanical or enzymatic digestion of the sample tissue. Explants of stria vascularis, 'mini-chips', are selectively cultured in growth medium, and primary cell lines are obtained in 7-10 d. The method is simple and reliable, and it provides high-quality ECs, PVM/Ms and PCs with a purity >90% after two passages. This protocol is suitable for producing primary culture cells from organs and tissues of small volume and high anatomical complexity, such as the inner ear capillaries. The highly purified primary cell lines enable cell culture-based in vitro modeling of cell-cell interactions, barrier control function and drug action.

  • 5.
    Rouhi, Pegah
    et al.
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jensen, Lasse D
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cao, Ziquan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hosaka, Kayoko
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Wahlberg, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Vascular surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Fleng Steffensen, John
    Marine Biological Laboratory, Biological Institute, University of Copenhagen, Helsingor, Denmark.
    Cao, Yihai
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hypoxia-induced metastasis model in embryonic zebrafish2010In: Nature Protocols, ISSN 1754-2189, E-ISSN 1750-2799, Vol. 5, no 12, p. 1911-1918Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypoxia facilitates tumor invasion and metastasis by promoting neovascularization and co-option of tumor cells in the peritumoral vasculature, leading to dissemination of tumor cells into the circulation. However, until recently, animal models and imaging technology did not enable monitoring of the early events of tumor cell invasion and dissemination in living animals. We recently developed a zebrafish metastasis model to dissect the detailed events of hypoxia-induced tumor cell invasion and metastasis in association with angiogenesis at the single-cell level. In this model, fluorescent DiI-labeled human or mouse tumor cells are implanted into the perivitelline cavity of 48-h-old zebrafish embryos, which are subsequently placed in hypoxic water for 3 d. Tumor cell invasion, metastasis and pathological angiogenesis are detected under fluorescent microscopy in the living fish. The average experimental time for this model is 7 d. Our protocol offers a remarkable opportunity to study molecular mechanisms of hypoxia-induced cancer metastasis.

1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf