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  • 1.
    Albin, Björn
    et al.
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Jan
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Elmståhl, Sölve
    Centre of Labour Market Policy Research (CAFO), School of Business and Economics, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    County Differences in Mortality among Foreign-Born Compared to Native Swedes 1970-19992012In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, Vol. 2012, art.id 136581- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Regional variations in mortality and morbidity have been shown in Europe and USA. Longitudinal studies have found increased mortality, dissimilarities in mortality pattern, and differences in utilization of healthcare between foreign- and native-born Swedes. No study has been found comparing mortality among foreign-born and native-born Swedes in relation to catchment areas/counties. Methods. The aim was to describe and compare mortality among foreign-born persons and native Swedes during 1970-1999 in 24 counties in Sweden. Data from the Statistics Sweden and the National Board of Health and Welfare was used, and the database consisted of 723,948 persons, 361,974 foreign-born living in Sweden in 1970 and aged 16 years and above and 361,974 matched Swedish controls. Results. Latest county of residence independently explained higher mortality among foreign-born persons in all but four counties; OR varied from 1.01 to 1.29. Counties with a more rural structure showed the highest differences between foreign-born persons and native controls. Foreign-born persons had a lower mean age (1.0-4.3 years) at time of death. Conclusion. County of residence influences mortality; higher mortality is indicated among migrants than native Swedes in counties with a more rural structure. Further studies are needed to explore possible explanations.

  • 2.
    Albin, Björn
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Jan
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Elmståhl, Sölve
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Utilization of In-Hospital Care among Foreign-Born Compared to Native Swedes 1987-19992012In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, Vol. 2012, 713249- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In previous longitudinal studies of mortality and morbidity among foreign-born and native-born Swedes, increased mortality and dissimilarities in mortality pattern were found. The aim of this study is to describe, compare, and analyse the utilization of in-hospital care among deceased foreign- and Swedish-born persons during the years 1987-1999 with focus on four diagnostic categories. The study population consisted of 361,974 foreign-born persons aged 16 years and upward who were registered as living in Sweden in 1970, together with 361,974 matched Swedish controls for each person. Data from Statistics Sweden (SCB) and the National Board of Health and Welfare Centre for Epidemiology, covering the period 1970-1999, was used. Persons were selected if they were admitted to hospital during 1987-1999 and the cause of death was in one of four ICD groups. The results indicate a tendency towards less health care utilization among migrants, especially men, as regards Symptoms, signs, and ill-defined conditions and Injury and poisoning. Further studies are needed to explore the possible explanations and the pattern of other diseases to see whether migrants, and especially migrant men, are a risk group with less utilization of health care.

  • 3.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Albin, Björn
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Benato, Rosa
    City University London, UK.
    Sourtzi, Panayota
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Migration and health2012In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, Vol. 2012, 621914- p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Mauthner, Oliver
    et al.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    De Luca, Enza
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Poole, Jennifer
    Ryerson University, Canada.
    Gerwarges, Mena
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Abbey, Susan
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ross, Heather
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Preparation and support of patients through the transplant process: Understanding the recipients' perspectives2012In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, Vol. 2012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preparation for heart transplant commonly includes booklets, instructional videos, personalized teaching sessions, and mentorship. This paper explores heart transplant recipients' thoughts on their preparation and support through the transplant process. Twenty-five interviews were audio-/videotaped capturing voice and body language and transcribed verbatim. Coding addressed language, bodily gesture, volume, and tone in keeping with our visual methodology. Recipients reported that only someone who had a transplant truly understands the experience. As participants face illness and life-altering experiences, maintaining a positive attitude and hope is essential to coping well. Healthcare professionals provide ongoing care and reassurance about recipients' medical status. Mentors, family members, and close friends play vital roles in supporting recipients. Participants reported that only heart transplant recipients understood the experience, the hope, and ultimately the suffering associated with living with another persons' heart. Attention needs to be focused not solely on the use of teaching modalities, but also on the development of innovative support networks. This will promote patient and caregiver engagement in self-management. Enhancing clinicians' knowledge of the existential aspects of transplantation will provide them with a nuanced understanding of the patients' experience, which will ultimately enhance their ability to better prepare and support patients and their caregivers.

  • 5.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Gustafsson, Per A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nelson, Nina
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Neonatal Intensive Care and Child Psychiatry Inpatient Care: Do Different Working Conditions Influence Stress Levels?2013In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, Vol. 2013Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. Nurses often experience work-related stress. High stress can negatively affect job satisfaction and lead to emotional exhaustion with risk of burnout.

    Aim. To analyse possible differences in biological stress markers, psychosocial working conditions,health, and well-being between nurses working in two different departments.

    Methods. Stress was evaluated in nurses working in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) (𝑛 = 33) and nursesworking in a child and adolescent psychiatry inpatient ward (CAP) (𝑛 = 14) using salivary cortisol and HbA1c. Salivary cortisol was measured three times a day on two consecutive days during two one-week periods, seven weeks apart (= 12 samples/person). Psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being were measured once.

    Results. NICU nurses had better social support and more self-determination. CAP nurses had a lower salivary cortisol quotient,poorer general health, and higher client-related burnout scores.

    Conclusion.When comparing these nurses with existing normdata for Sweden, as a group their scores reflect less work-related stress than Swedes overall. However, the comparison between NICU and CAP nurses indicates a less healthy work situation for CAP nurses.

    Relevance to Clinical Practice. Healthcare managers need to acknowledge the less healthy work situation CAP nurses experience in order to provide optimal support and promote good health.

  • 6.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    et al.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Finnström, Berit
    University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Forsner, Maria
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    The Facial Affective Scale as a Predictor for Pain Unpleasantness When Children Undergo Immunizations2014In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, no 628198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Needle fear is a common problem in children undergoing immunization. To ensure that the individual child's needs are met during a painful procedure it would be beneficial to be able to predict whether there is a need for extra support. The self-reporting instrument facial affective scale (FAS) could have potential for this purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the FAS can predict pain unpleasantness in girls undergoing immunization. Girls, aged 11-12 years, reported their expected pain unpleasantness on the FAS at least two weeks before and then experienced pain unpleasantness immediately before each vaccination. The experienced pain unpleasantness during the vaccination was also reported immediately after each immunization. The level of anxiety was similarly assessed during each vaccination and supplemented with stress measures in relation to the procedure in order to assess and evaluate concurrent validity. The results show that the FAS is valid to predict pain unpleasantness in 11-12-year-old girls who undergo immunizations and that it has the potential to be a feasible instrument to identify children who are in need of extra support to cope with immunization. In conclusion, the FAS measurement can facilitate caring interventions.

  • 7.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Ivarsson, Bodil
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery/THAI, Skåne University Hospital and Medical Services, Lund, Sweden.
    Rönning, Helén
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    The Unsteady Mainstay of the Family: Now Adult Children's Retrospective View on Social Support in Relation to Their Parent's Heart Transplantation.2014In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, Vol. 2014, 541241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The needs for support among children with a seriously ill parent, who is waiting for heart transplantation, are unknown today. The aim was to describe now adult children's experiences of social support in relation to a parent's heart transplant during childhood. Nine females and four males were interviewed. The median age for the children was 18 at the transplantation and their parents had been ill before for 18 months (median) and on waiting list for 161 days (mean). Three categories emerged: health care professionals' approaches, family and friends' approaches, and society approaches. Our results show that there was lack of support for children of heart transplantation patients. Support in the shape of information was in most cases provided by the sick or healthy parent. It is of great clinical importance to develop psychosocial support programs for children with a seriously ill parent waiting for heart transplantation (before, during, and after surgery).

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