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  • 1. Bachinger, Th
    et al.
    Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biotechnology .
    Searching for process information in the aroma of cell cultures2000In: Trends in Biotechnology, ISSN 0167-7799, E-ISSN 1879-3096, Vol. 18, no 12, p. 494-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aroma emissions from living cells can provide valuable information about the metabolic and physiological condition of those cells. Electronic noses are chemical gas-sensor arrays that use artificial neural network models to evaluate aromas. They can interpret the complex aroma information emitted from cultures of bacteria, yeast cells and animal cells. Potential applications for electronic noses range from medical diagnosis to industrial bioprocessing. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  • 2.
    Bricarello, Daniel A
    et al.
    University of California, Davis, USA .
    Patel, Mira A
    University of California, Davis, USA .
    Parikh, Atul Navinchandra
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inhibiting host-pathogen interactions using membrane-based nanostructures2012In: Trends in Biotechnology, ISSN 0167-7799, E-ISSN 1879-3096, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 323-330Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Virulent strains of bacteria and viruses recognize host cells by their plasma membrane receptors and often exploit the native translocation machinery to invade the cell. A promising therapeutic concept for early interruption of pathogen infection is to subvert this pathogenic trickery using exogenously introduced decoys that present high-affinity mimics of cellular receptors. This review highlights emerging applications of molecularly engineered lipid-bilayer-based nanostructures, namely (i) functionalized liposomes, (ii) supported colloidal bilayers or protocells and (Hi) reconstituted lipoproteins, which display functional cellular receptors in optimized conformational and aggregative states. These decoys outcompete host cell receptors by preferentially binding to and neutralizing virulence factors of both bacteria and viruses, thereby promising a new approach to antipathogenic therapy.

  • 3.
    COLBY, J
    et al.
    UNIV NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE,SCH MED,DEPT MICROBIOL,NEWCASTLE TYNE NE1 7RU,TYNE and WEAR,ENGLAND; CRANFIELD INST TECHNOL,CTR BIOTECHNOL,CRANFIELD MK43 0AL,BEDS,ENGLAND; .
    WILLIAMS, E
    UNIV NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE,SCH MED,DEPT MICROBIOL,NEWCASTLE TYNE NE1 7RU,TYNE and WEAR,ENGLAND; CRANFIELD INST TECHNOL,CTR BIOTECHNOL,CRANFIELD MK43 0AL,BEDS,ENGLAND; .
    TURNER, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    APPLICATIONS OF CO-UTILIZING MICROORGANISMS1985In: Trends in Biotechnology, ISSN 0167-7799, E-ISSN 1879-3096, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 12-17Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 4.
    Ge, Yi
    et al.
    Cranfield University, Bedford MK45 4DT, England.
    P. F. Turner, Anthony
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Too large to fit? Recent developments in macromolecular imprinting2008In: Trends in Biotechnology, ISSN 0167-7799, E-ISSN 1879-3096, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 218-224Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecular imprinting involves the synthesis of polymers in the presence of a template to produce complementary binding sites with specific recognition ability. The technique has been successfully applied as a measurement and separation technology, producing a uniquely robust and antibody-like polymeric material. Low molecular weight molecules have been extensively exploited as imprint templates, leading to significant achievements in solid-phase extraction, sensing and enzyme-like catalysis. By contrast, macromolecular imprinting remains underdeveloped, principally because of the lack of binding site accessibility. In this review, we focus on the most recent developments in this area, not only covering the widespread use of biological macro-templates but also highlighting the emerging use of synthetic macro-templates, such as dendrimers and hyperbranched polymers.

  • 5.
    Loo, Jacky F. C.
    et al.
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Ho, Aaron H. P.
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Turner, Anthony P. F.
    Cranfield Univ, England.
    Mak, Wing Cheung
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Integrated Printed Microfluidic Biosensors2019In: Trends in Biotechnology, ISSN 0167-7799, E-ISSN 1879-3096, Vol. 37, no 10, p. 1104-1120Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Integrated printed microfluidic biosensors are one of the most recent point-of-care (POC) sensor developments. Fast turnaround time for production and ease of customization, enabled by the integration of recognition elements and transducers, are key for on-site biosensing for both healthcare and industry and for speeding up translation to real-life applications. Here, we provide an overview of recent progress in printed microfluidics, from the 2D to the 4D level, accompanied by novel sensing element integration. We also explore the latest trends in integrated printed microfluidics for healthcare, especially POC diagnostics, and food safety applications.

  • 6.
    Ohlson, S
    et al.
    Kalmar.
    Jungar, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biotechnology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Strandh, M
    Kalmar.
    Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biotechnology.
    Continuous weak-affinity immunosensing2000In: Trends in Biotechnology, ISSN 0167-7799, E-ISSN 1879-3096, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 49-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A multitude of weak biological interactions, either working alone or in concert, occur frequently throughout biological systems. We have used this natural feature of readily reversible interactions as the basis for continuous immunosensing. In a model system, a set of weak monoclonal antibodies directed towards a carbohydrate epitope was studied with the aid of surface plasmon resonance. Because the system requires no regeneration, it can be used as a truly on-line immunosensing device. This principle should have wide application in all areas where there is a need for the continuous evaluation of a molecule.

  • 7.
    Patra, Hirak K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The potential legacy of cancer nanotechnology: celluar selection2014In: Trends in Biotechnology, ISSN 0167-7799, E-ISSN 1879-3096, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 21-31Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Overexpression of oncogenes or loss of tumour suppressors can transform a normal cell to a cancerous one, resulting in uncontrolled regulation of intracellular signalling pathways and immunity to stresses, which both pose therapeutic challenges. Conventional approaches to cancer therapy, although they are effective at killing cancer cells, may still fail due to inadequate biodistribution and unwanted side effects. Nanotechnology-based approaches provide a promising alternative, with the possibility of targeting cells at an early stage, during their transformation into cancer cells. This review considers techniques that specifically target those molecular changes, which begin in only a very small percentage of normal cells as they undergo transformation. These techniques are crucial for early-stage diagnosis and therapy.

  • 8.
    Piletsky, SA
    et al.
    Cranfield University, Institute Biosci and Technology, Silsoe MK45 4DT, Beds, England; .
    Alcock, S
    Cranfield University, Institute Biosci and Technology, Silsoe MK45 4DT, Beds, England; .
    Turner, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Molecular imprinting: at the edge of the third millennium2001In: Trends in Biotechnology, ISSN 0167-7799, E-ISSN 1879-3096, Vol. 19, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) represent a new class of materials that have artificially created receptor structures(1-3). Since their discovery in 1972, MIPs have attracted considerable interest from scientists and engineers involved with the development of chromatographic adsorbents, membranes, sensors and enzyme and receptor mimics.

  • 9.
    Poma, Alessandro
    et al.
    Cranfield University, Cranfield MK43 0AL, Beds, England.
    P. F. Turner, Anthony
    Cranfield University, UK.
    A. Piletsky, Sergey
    Cranfield University, Cranfield MK43 0AL, Beds, England.
    Advances in the manufacture of MIP nanoparticles2010In: Trends in Biotechnology, ISSN 0167-7799, E-ISSN 1879-3096, Vol. 28, no 12, p. 629-637Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are prepared by creating a three-dimensional polymeric matrix around a template molecule After the matrix is removed, complementary cavities with respect to shape and functional groups remain MIPs have been produced for applications in in vitro diagnostics, therapeutics and separations However, this promising technology still lacks widespread application because of issues related to large-scale production and optimization of the synthesis Recent developments in the area of MIP nanoparticles might offer solutions to several problems associated with performance and application This review discusses various approaches used in the preparation of MIP nanoparticles, focusing in particular on the issues associated with large-scale manufacture and implications for the performance of synthesized nanomaterials

  • 10.
    Preechaburana, Pakorn
    et al.
    Thammasat University, Pathumthani, Thailand.
    Suska, Anke
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Biosensing with cell phones2014In: Trends in Biotechnology, ISSN 0167-7799, E-ISSN 1879-3096, Vol. 32, no 7, p. 351-355Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continued progress in cell-phone devices has made them powerful mobile computers, equipped with sophisticated, permanent physical sensors embedded as the default configuration. By contrast, the incorporation of permanent biosensors in cell-phone units has been prevented by the multivocal nature of the stimuli and the reactions involved in biosensing and chemical sensing. Biosensing with cell phones entails the complementation of biosensing devices with the physical sensors and communication and processing capabilities of modern cell phones. Biosensing, chemical-sensing, environmental-sensing, and diagnostic capabilities would thus be supported and run on the residual capacity of existing cell-phone infrastructure. The technologies necessary to materialize such a scenario have emerged in different fields and applications. This article addresses the progress on cell-phone biosensing, the specific compromises, and the blend of technologies required to craft biosensing on cell phones.

  • 11.
    Turner, Anthony
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Biosensors: boldly going into the new millenium2001In: Trends in Biotechnology, ISSN 0167-7799, E-ISSN 1879-3096, Vol. 21 (4), p. 268-271Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Turner, Anthony
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Biosensors:  The state-of-the-art1990In: Trends in Biotechnology, ISSN 0167-7799, E-ISSN 1879-3096, Vol. 8, p. 167-170Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Letter: Biosensors: then and now2013In: Trends in Biotechnology, ISSN 0167-7799, E-ISSN 1879-3096, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 119-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

1 - 13 of 13
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