liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Hagberg, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    What about community sustainability? - dilemmas of ageing in shrinking semi-rural areas in Sweden2018In: Scottish Geographical Journal, ISSN 1470-2541, E-ISSN 1751-665X, Vol. 134, no 3-4, p. 103-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many municipalities in Sweden have decreasing population rates combined with an increasing proportion of older people. Such a demographic shift will influence the way life is led as the foundation for service provision and social activities becomes undermined. This leads us to question the extent to which shrinking municipalities can be considered socially sustainable. The aim of the paper was to investigate older peoples participation in the local community and to study the perceived changes in the local community as reported by older people and how these are experienced. A postal survey was sent out to all inhabitants aged 80 years and older living in their own household in three small, semi-rural municipalities in southern Sweden, in total 1386. The response rate was 60%. Thus, focus was on the experiences of the oldest individuals. The research questions analysed for this study concerned the ageing populations social networks, community involvement, car dependence and service provision. The results are used to discuss the social sustainability of the societies in which these people have lived for a long time.

  • 2.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Spaces for waste: Everyday recycling and sociospatial relationships2018In: Scottish Geographical Journal, ISSN 1470-2541, E-ISSN 1751-665X, Vol. 134, no 3-4, p. 141-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recycling of household waste has been proposed on different geographical levels as the key to sustainable resource management. This paper explores the sociospatial relationships of a waste management system at local level in Sweden. In this system, all waste was considered recyclable and tenants were expected to adopt certain recycling practices, although some prerequisites, such as language skills, were lacking. Theoretical approaches from geographies of power and surveillance studies are combined to analyse how spaces for waste at recycling stations were transformed and imbued with political claims of sustainability. The analyses are based on a detailed case study conducted in a neighbourhood of blocks of flats, with a focus on the design and use of recycling stations. In both their design and use, authority strategies were adopted to legitimise actions and influence recycling practices. Control measures were eventually taken and technologies were installed to restrict improper practices. Practices of discrimination were identified together with how recycling excluded some people from participating in the scheme. By using another power strategy, i.e. seduction, it was possible to reach and include more tenants.

  • 3.
    Hermelin, Brita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Centre for Municipality Studies – CKS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Ida
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden; Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    How green growth is adopted by local policy - a comparative study of ten second-rank cities in Sweden2018In: Scottish Geographical Journal, ISSN 1470-2541, E-ISSN 1751-665X, Vol. 134, no 3-4, p. 184-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 1992 Rio Earth Summit represented a crucial point in time at which the key role of the local level for sustainable development was importantly endorsed. However, since this UN summit, ideals about how to design local sustainable development have changed significantly. This paper investigates how local policy in ten second-rank cities in Sweden has adopted decoupling arguments and endorsed green growth concepts established through international governance communities. Using content analysis of politically ratified steering documents in these cities, the main findings suggest that local strategising related to the policy goals of green growth is mainly related to energy efficiency. Derived from the decoupling argument, one factor behind shallow integration of green growth into municipal policy is that green growth could be considered a political and contested concept. The fact that there has been limited implementation of this framework across the investigated municipalities prompts reflections on how the results could be explained by institutional match or mismatch between local institutional environments for policy interventions and the green growth concepts promoted by international communities. The adoption of green growth concepts requires local authorities to broaden their commitment for interventions in interactions with industry and business.

  • 4.
    Hermelin, Brita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Centre for Municipality Studies – CKS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Trygg, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Local approaches to sustainable development with case studies from Sweden2018In: Scottish Geographical Journal, ISSN 1470-2541, E-ISSN 1751-665X, Vol. 134, no 3-4, p. 97-102Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 5.
    Köhler, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Learning from a failed project: challenges of implementing 'green' technology in a real world setting2018In: Scottish Geographical Journal, ISSN 1470-2541, E-ISSN 1751-665X, Vol. 134, no 3-4, p. 158-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable development goals are defined at various institutional and organisational levels, and generate numerous ‘green’ technology projects. Most research concerns successful projects, and good examples are put forward for others to learn from. However, to pave the way for sustainability in practice, more knowledge is needed about the failed projects – what, or who, obstructs the realisation of ecologically motivated projects? This study explores, from a time-geographical perspective, a failed project concerning the introduction of individual metering and debiting of hot tap water in rented flats in Sweden. The study is based on interviews with key persons, observations and documents. The results underline the importance of acknowledging all project constraints and their interrelationship in an implementation process to explain project failure, being of an economic, political, social, cultural, technical, physical or legislative nature. Put into local contexts, similar ‘green technology’ will have different connotations and will have to deal with place-specific constraints. The project owner’s possibility to control and overcome local constraints will determine if the project will succeed or fail.

  • 6.
    Magnusson, Dick
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Going back to the roots: the fourth generation of Swedish eco-villages2018In: Scottish Geographical Journal, ISSN 1470-2541, E-ISSN 1751-665XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Local reactions to climate change and sustainable development take various forms. The literature on grassroots innovation has grown recently, and it illustrates the myriad of initiatives that are actively working with the issues. The eco-village movement is one example of a grassroots innovation that reacts and adapts to its prerequisites, all striving for an alternative living with reduced environmental impact. This paper focuses on the development of eco-villages in Sweden, arguing that in recent years a fourth generation of initiatives has emerged, with ideals close to the pioneers of the first generation’s idealistic views and ambitions for alternative living as a way of reacting to global trends. The fourth generation is highly diverse in form and goals, but with an emphasis on outreach and networking as well as more focus on small-scale agriculture and permaculture. This paper presents, through literature reviews, database searches and interviews, how the eco-village idea has moved between initiatives and has taken various forms over the generations. In the first generation via books, reports and personal contacts, in the second and third also via contractors and professionals, and in the fourth via the internet and social media in order to attract members and have impact.

  • 7.
    Trygg, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Understanding collaboration and local development: a Swedish case study on different actors’ roles and perspectives2018In: Scottish Geographical Journal, ISSN 1470-2541, E-ISSN 1751-665X, Vol. 134, no 3-4, p. 172-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ten years ago, the concept of retirement homes ceased to exist in Sweden. This was a result of the Delegation on Elderly Living’s suggestion whereby the terminology for and characteristics of accommodation for the elderly changed. This makes it hard to plan and change how the elderly live in Sweden. When it comes to renovating housing for the elderly, the municipalities and property owners do not know how to deal with the situation. This is despite the fact that the situation in Sweden is the same as many other countries around the world: the population is ageing and there is a clear need for housing for the elderly. This case study examines a project to renovate a building complex which has failed to get started. The analytical framework of collaborative governance has been adapted and used as inspiration for understanding this at a local level. From a narrative perspective, mixed methods were used. Two conclusions are drawn. Firstly, the concept of drivers for collaborative governance helps to explain why the project was difficult to realise. Secondly, both the categorisation and concept of housing for the elderly have changed with policy implications.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf