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  • 1.
    Bengtsson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och hälsa, Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs universitet; Centrum för personcentrerad vård (GPCC), Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och hälsa, Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs universitet; Centrum för personcentrerad vård (GPCC), Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Hallberg, Inger
    Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och hälsa, Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs universitet; Centrum för personcentrerad vård (GPCC), Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Centrum för personcentrerad vård (GPCC), Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs universitet; Institutionen för kost- och idrottsvetenskap, Psykologiska institutionen, Göteborgs universitet.
    Taft, Charles
    Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och hälsa, Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs universitet; Centrum för personcentrerad vård (GPCC), Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Improved blood pressure control using an interactive mobile phone support system2016In: The Journal of Clinical Hypertension, ISSN 1524-6175, E-ISSN 1751-7176, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 101-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This explorative, longitudinal study evaluated the effect of the daily use of a mobile phone-based self-management support system for hypertension in reducing blood pressure (BP) among 50 primary care patients with hypertension over 8 weeks. The self-management system comprises modules for (1) self-reports of BP, pulse, lifestyle, symptoms, and well-being; (2) delivery of reminders and encouragements; and (3) graphical feedback of self-reports. Daily use of the support system significantly reduced BP (systolic BP -7 mm Hg, diastolic BP -4.9 mm Hg) between baseline and week 8, with daily improvements leveling off as the study progressed. Three homogenous subsets of patients were identified who, despite different initial BP levels, showed similar decreases in BP during the study, indicating that patients benefited irrespective of baseline BP. In showing significant reductions in BP, our results suggest that the self-management support system may be a useful tool in clinical practice to help patients self-manage their hypertension.

  • 2.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Beta-blockers, hypertension, and stroke outcomes2018In: The Journal of Clinical Hypertension, ISSN 1524-6175, E-ISSN 1751-7176, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 573-574Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 3.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Editorial Material: Diuretics and Cerebrovascular Outcomes-Beyond Traditional Endpoints in JOURNAL OF CLINICAL HYPERTENSION, vol 17, issue 4, pp 273-2742015In: The Journal of Clinical Hypertension, ISSN 1524-6175, E-ISSN 1751-7176, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 273-274Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 4.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Dena, Mary
    Norra Alvsborg Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Dahlqvist, Sofia
    NU Hosp Grp, Sweden.
    Sofizadeh, Sheyda
    NU Hosp Grp, Sweden.
    Hirsch, Irl
    Univ Washington, WA 98195 USA.
    Tuomilehto, Jaakko
    Natl Inst Hlth and Welf, Finland; King Abdulaziz Univ, Saudi Arabia.
    Martensson, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Torffvit, Ole
    Lindsdal, Sweden.
    Imberg, Henrik
    Stat Konsultgrp, Sweden; Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Saeed, Aso
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lind, Marcus
    NU Hosp Grp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Predictors and correlates of systolic blood pressure reduction with liraglutide treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes2019In: The Journal of Clinical Hypertension, ISSN 1524-6175, E-ISSN 1751-7176, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 105-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Liraglutide is associated with blood pressure reduction in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, it is not known whether this blood pressure reduction can be predicted prior to treatment initiation, and to what extent it correlates with weight loss and with improved glycemic control during follow-up. We analyzed data from a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, in which 124 insulin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes were randomized to liraglutide or placebo. We evaluated various baseline variables as potential predictors of systolic blood pressure (SBP) reduction, and evaluated whether changes in SBP correlated with weight loss and with improved glycemic control. A greater reduction in SBP among liraglutide-treated patients was predicted by higher baseline values of SBP (P amp;lt; 0.0001) and diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.012), and by lower baseline values of mean glucose measured by continuous glucose monitoring (CGM; P = 0.044), and serum fasting C-peptide (P = 0.015). The regression coefficients differed significantly between the liraglutide group and the placebo group only for diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.037) and mean CGM (P = 0.021). During the trial period, SBP reduction correlated directly with change in body weight and BMI, but not with change in HbA1c. We conclude that patients with lower mean CGM values at baseline responded to liraglutide with a larger reduction in SBP, and that improved HbA1c during follow-up was not associated with reductions of SBP. Our data suggest that some patients with type 2 diabetes may benefit from liraglutide in terms of weight and SBP reduction.

  • 5.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Sandberg, Klas
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Norrköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Kleist, Marie
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Falk, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    The exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise in the sub-acute phase after stroke is not affected by aerobic exercise.2018In: The Journal of Clinical Hypertension, ISSN 1524-6175, E-ISSN 1751-7176, Journal of Clinical Hypertension, Vol. 20, p. 56-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of an exaggerated exercise blood pressure (BP) response is unknown in patients with subacute stroke, and it is not known whether an aerobic exercise program modulates this response. The authors randomized 53 patients (27 women) with subacute stroke to 12 weeks of twice-weekly aerobic exercise (n = 29) or to usual care without scheduled physical exercise (n = 24). At baseline, 66% of the patients exhibited an exaggerated exercise BP response (peak systolic BP ≥210 mm Hg in men and ≥190 mm Hg in women) during a symptom-limited ergometer exercise test. At follow-up, patients who had been randomized to the exercise program achieved higher peak work rate, but peak systolic BP remained unaltered. Among patients with a recent stroke, it was common to have an exaggerated systolic BP response during exercise. This response was not altered by participation in a 12-week program of aerobic exercise.

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