liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ahlstrom, Christina A.
    et al.
    US Geol Survey, AK 99508 USA.
    Bonnedahl, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar Cty Council, Sweden.
    Woksepp, Hanna
    Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Hernandez, Jorge
    Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Reed, John A.
    US Geol Survey, AK 99508 USA.
    Tibbitts, Lee
    US Geol Survey, AK 99508 USA.
    Olsen, Bjoern
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Douglas, David C.
    US Geol Survey, AK USA.
    Ramey, Andrew M.
    US Geol Survey, AK 99508 USA.
    Satellite tracking of gulls and genomic characterization of faecal bacteria reveals environmentally mediated acquisition and dispersal of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska2019In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 28, no 10, p. 2531-2545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gulls (Larus spp.) have frequently been reported to carry Escherichia coli exhibiting antimicrobial resistance (AMR E. coli); however, the pathways governing the acquisition and dispersal of such bacteria are not well described. We equipped 17 landfill-foraging gulls with satellite transmitters and collected gull faecal samples longitudinally from four locations on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska to assess: (a) gull attendance and transitions between sites, (b) spatiotemporal prevalence of faecally shed AMR E. coli, and (c) genomic relatedness of AMR E. coli isolates among sites. We also sampled Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) harvested as part of personal-use dipnet fisheries at two sites to assess potential contamination with AMR E. coli. Among our study sites, marked gulls most commonly occupied the lower Kenai River (61% of site locations) followed by the Soldotna landfill (11%), lower Kasilof River (5%) and upper Kenai River (amp;lt;1%). Gulls primarily moved between the Soldotna landfill and the lower Kenai River (94% of transitions among sites), which were also the two locations with the highest prevalence of AMR E. coli. There was relatively high spatial and temporal variability in AMR E. coli prevalence in gull faeces and there was no evidence of contamination on salmon harvested in personal-use fisheries. We identified E. coli sequence types and AMR genes of clinical importance, with some isolates possessing genes associated with resistance to as many as eight antibiotic classes. Our findings suggest that gulls acquire AMR E. coli at habitats with anthropogenic inputs and subsequent movements may represent pathways through which AMR is dispersed.

  • 2.
    Bakovic, Vid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Nat Resources and Life Sci Vienna, Austria.
    Schuler, Hannes
    Free Univ Bozen Bolzano, Italy.
    Schebeck, Martin
    Univ Nat Resources and Life Sci Vienna, Austria.
    Feder, Jeffrey L.
    Univ Notre Dame, IN 46556 USA.
    Stauffer, Christian
    Univ Nat Resources and Life Sci Vienna, Austria.
    Ragland, Gregory J.
    Univ Colorado, CO 80202 USA.
    Host plant-related genomic differentiation in the European cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis cerasi2019In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 28, no 20, p. 4648-4666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elucidating the mechanisms and conditions facilitating the formation of biodiversity are central topics in evolutionary biology. A growing number of studies imply that divergent ecological selection may often play a critical role in speciation by counteracting the homogenising effects of gene flow. Several examples involve phytophagous insects, where divergent selection pressures associated with host plant shifts may generate reproductive isolation, promoting speciation. Here, we use ddRADseq to assess the population structure and to test for host-related genomic differentiation in the European cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis cerasi (L., 1758) (Diptera: Tephritidae). This tephritid is distributed throughout Europe and western Asia, and has adapted to two different genera of host plants, Prunus spp. (cherries) and Lonicera spp. (honeysuckle). Our data imply that geographic distance and geomorphic barriers serve as the primary factors shaping genetic population structure across the species range. Locally, however, flies genetically cluster according to host plant, with consistent allele frequency differences displayed by a subset of loci between Prunus and Lonicera flies across four sites surveyed in Germany and Norway. These 17 loci display significantly higher F-ST values between host plants than others. They also showed high levels of linkage disequilibrium within and between Prunus and Lonicera flies, supporting host-related selection and reduced gene flow. Our findings support the existence of sympatric host races in R. cerasi embedded within broader patterns of geographic variation in the fly, similar to the related apple maggot, Rhagoletis pomonella, in North America.

  • 3.
    Eroukhmanoff, Fabrice
    et al.
    Section for Animal Ecology, Ecology Building, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hargeby, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Svensson, Erik I
    Section for Animal Ecology, Ecology Building, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rapid adaptive divergence between ecotypes of an aquatic isopod inferred from F-ST-Q(ST) analysis2009In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 18, no 23, p. 4912-4923Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Divergent natural selection is often thought to be the principal factor driving phenotypic differentiation between populations. We studied two ecotypes of the aquatic isopod Asellus aquaticus which have diverged in parallel in several Swedish lakes. In these lakes, isopods from reed belts along the shores colonized new stonewort stands in the centre of the lakes and rapid phenotypic changes in size and pigmentation followed after colonization. We investigated if selection was likely to be responsible for these observed phenotypic changes using indirect inferences of selection (F-ST-Q(ST) analysis). Average Q(ST) for seven quantitative traits were higher than the average F-ST between ecotypes for putatively neutral markers (AFLPs). This suggests that divergent natural selection has played an important role during this rapid diversification. In contrast, the average Q(ST) between the different reed ecotype populations was not significantly different from the mean F-ST. Genetic drift could therefore not be excluded as an explanation for the minor differences between allopatric populations inhabiting the same source habitat. We complemented this traditional F-ST-Q(ST) approach by comparing the F-ST distributions across all loci (n = 67-71) with the Q(ST) for each of the seven traits. This analysis revealed that pigmentation traits had diverged to a greater extent and at higher evolutionary rates than size-related morphological traits. In conclusion, this extended and detailed type of F-ST-Q(ST) analysis provides a powerful method to infer adaptive phenotypic divergence between populations. However, indirect inferences about the operation of divergent selection should be analyzed on a per-trait basis and complemented with detailed ecological information.

  • 4.
    Gering, E.
    et al.
    Kellogg Biological Station, Michigan State Universiry, 3700 East Gull Lake Road, Hickory Corners, MI 49060, USA.
    Johnsson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Willis, P.
    Department of Biology, University of Victoria, Cunningham 202, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2, Canada.
    Getty, T.
    Kellogg Biological Station, Michigan State Universiry, 3700 East Gull Lake Road, Hickory Corners, MI 49060, USA.
    Wright, Dominic
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mixed ancestry and admixture in Kauai's feral chickens: invasion of domestic genes into ancient Red Junglefowl reserviors2015In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 24, no 9, p. 2112-2124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A major goal of invasion genetics is to determine how establishment histories shape non-native organisms' genotypes and phenotypes. While domesticated species commonly escape cultivation to invade feral habitats, few studies have examined how this process shapes feral gene pools and traits. We collected genomic and phenotypic data from feral chickens (Gallus gallus) on the Hawaiian island of Kauai to (i) ascertain their origins and (ii) measure standing variation in feral genomes, morphology and behaviour. Mitochondrial phylogenies (D-loop & whole Mt genome) revealed two divergent clades within our samples. The rare clade also contains sequences from Red Junglefowl (the domestic chicken's progenitor) and ancient DNA sequences from Kauai that predate European contact. This lineage appears to have been dispersed into the east Pacific by ancient Polynesian colonists. The more prevalent MtDNA clade occurs worldwide and includes domesticated breeds developed recently in Europe that are farmed within Hawaii. We hypothesize this lineage originates from recently feralized livestock and found supporting evidence for increased G. gallus density on Kauai within the last few decades. SNPs obtained from whole-genome sequencing were consistent with historic admixture between Kauai's divergent (G. gallus) lineages. Additionally, analyses of plumage, skin colour and vocalizations revealed that Kauai birds' behaviours and morphologies overlap with those of domestic chickens and Red Junglefowl, suggesting hybrid origins. Together, our data support the hypotheses that (i) Kauai's feral G. gallus descend from recent invasion(s) of domestic chickens into an ancient Red Junglefowl reservoir and (ii) feral chickens exhibit greater phenotypic diversity than candidate source populations. These findings complicate management objectives for Pacific feral chickens, while highlighting the potential of this and other feral systems for evolutionary studies of invasions.

  • 5.
    Hansson, B.
    et al.
    Department of Animal Ecology, Ecology Building, Lund University, 223 62 Lund, Sweden.
    Westerberg, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Ecology .
    On the correlation between heterozygosity and fitness in natural populations2002In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 11, no 12, p. 2467-2474Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three primary hypotheses currently prevail for correlations between heterozygosity at a set of molecular markers and fitness in natural populations. First, multilocus heterozygosity-fitness correlations might result from selection acting directly on the scored loci, such as at particular allozyme loci. Second, significant levels of linkage disequilibrium, as in recently bottlenecked-and-expanded populations, might cause associations between the markers and fitness loci in the local chromosomal vicinity. Third, in partially inbred populations, heterozygosity at the markers might reflect variation in the inbreeding coefficient and might associate with fitness as a result of effects of homozygosity at genome-wide distributed loci. Despite years of research, the relative importance of these hypotheses remains unclear. The screening of heterozygosity at polymorphic DNA markers offers an opportunity to resolve this issue, and relevant empirical studies have now emerged. We provide an account of the recent progress on the subject, and give suggestions on how to distinguish between the three hypotheses in future studies.

  • 6.
    Johnsson, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rubin, Carl-Johan
    Department of Medical Biochemistry and Michrobiology, BMC, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Höglund, Andrey
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sahlqvist, A-S,
    Research group of Autoimmunity, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Jonsson, K.B.
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala university, Sweden.
    Kerje, S.
    Research group of Autoimmunity, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ekwall, O.
    Research group of Autoimmunity, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Kämpe, O.
    Research group of Autoimmunity, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Andersson, L.
    Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Jensen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wright, Dominic
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The role of pleiotropy and linkage in genes affecting a sexual ornament and bone allocation in the chicken2014In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 23, no 9, p. 2275-2286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sexual selection and the ornaments that inform such choices have been extensively studied, particularly from a phenotypic perspective. Although more is being revealed about the genetic architecture of sexual ornaments, much still remains to be discovered. The comb of the chicken is one of the most widely recognized sexual ornaments, which has been shown to be correlated with both fecundity and bone allocation. In this study, we use a combination of multiple intercrosses between White Leghorn populations and wild-derived Red Junglefowl to, first, map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for bone allocation and, second, to identify expression QTL that correlate and colocalize with comb mass. These candidate quantitative genes were then assessed for potential pleiotropic effects on bone tissue and fecundity traits. We identify genes that correlate with both relative comb mass and bone traits suggesting a combination of both pleiotropy and linkage mediates gene regulatory variation in these traits.

  • 7.
    Pauperio, J
    et al.
    University of Porto, Portugal University of York, England University of Porto, Portugal .
    Herman, J S
    University of York, England National Museums Scotland, Scotland .
    Melo-Ferreira, J
    University of Porto, Portugal .
    Jaarola, Maarit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alves, P C
    University of Porto, Portugal University of Porto, Portugal University of Montana, MT 59801 USA .
    Searle, J B
    University of York, England Cornell University, NY 14853 USA .
    Cryptic speciation in the field vole: a multilocus approach confirms three highly divergent lineages in Eurasia2012In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 21, no 24, p. 6015-6032Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Species are generally described from morphological features, but there is growing recognition of sister forms that show substantial genetic differentiation without obvious morphological variation and may therefore be considered cryptic species. Here, we investigate the field vole (Microtus agrestis), a Eurasian mammal with little apparent morphological differentiation but which, on the basis of previous sex-linked nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analyses, is subdivided into a Northern and a Southern lineage, sufficiently divergent that they may represent two cryptic species. These earlier studies also provided limited evidence for two major mtDNA lineages within Iberia. In our present study, we extend these findings through a multilocus approach. We sampled 163 individuals from 46 localities, mainly in Iberia, and sequenced seven loci, maternally, paternally and biparentally inherited. Our results show that the mtDNA lineage identified in Portugal is indeed a distinct third lineage on the basis of other markers as well. In fact, multilocus coalescent-based methods clearly support three separate evolutionary units that may represent cryptic species: Northern, Southern and Portuguese. Divergence among these units was inferred to have occurred during the last glacial period; the Portuguese lineage split occurred first (estimated at c. 70 000 bp), and the Northern and Southern lineages separated at around the last glacial maximum (estimated at c. 18 500 bp). Such recent formation of evolutionary units that might be considered species has repercussions in terms of understanding evolutionary processes and the diversity of small mammals in a European context.

  • 8.
    Poelstra, J. W.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Vijay, N.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hoeppner, M. P.
    Linköping University. Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wolf, J. B. W.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Science Life Lab, Sweden.
    Transcriptomics of colour patterning and coloration shifts in crows2015In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 24, no 18, p. 4617-4628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Animal coloration is one of the most conspicuous phenotypic traits in natural populations and has important implications for adaptation and speciation. Changes in coloration can occur over surprisingly short evolutionary timescales, while recurrence of similar colour patterns across large phylogenetic distances is also common. Even though the genetic basis of pigment production is well understood, little is known about the mechanisms regulating colour patterning. In this study, we shed light on the molecular elements regulating regional pigment production in two genetically near-identical crow taxa with striking differences in a eumelanin-based phenotype: black carrion and grey-coated hooded crows. We produced a high-quality genome annotation and analysed transcriptome data from a 2 3 2 design of active melanogenic feather follicles from head (black in both taxa) and torso (black in carrion and grey in hooded crow). Extensive, parallel expression differences between body regions in both taxa, enriched for melanogenesis genes (e.g. ASIP, CORIN, and ALDH6), indicated the presence of cryptic prepatterning also in all-black carrion crows. Meanwhile, colour-specific expression (grey vs. black) was limited to a small number of melanogenesis genes in close association with the central transcription factor MITF (most notably HPGDS, NDP and RASGRF1). We conclude that colour pattern differences between the taxa likely result from an interaction between divergence in upstream elements of the melanogenesis pathway and genes that provide an underlying prepattern across the body through positional information. A model of evolutionary stable prepatterns that can be exposed and masked through simple regulatory changes may explain the phylogenetically independent recurrence of colour patterns that is observed across corvids and many other vertebrate groups.

  • 9.
    Rice, William
    et al.
    Department of Ecology, Evolution & Marine Biology, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, USA.
    Friberg, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gavrilets, Sergey
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Department of Mathematics, National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA.
    Sexually antagonistic epigenetic marks that canalize sexually dimorphic development2016In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 25, no 8, p. 1812-1822Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sexes share the same autosomal genomes, yet sexual dimorphism is common due to sex-specific gene expression. When present, XX and XY karyotypes trigger alternate regulatory cascades that determine sex-specific gene expression profiles. In mammals, secretion of testosterone (T) by the testes during foetal development is the master switch influencing the gene expression pathways (male vs. female) that will be followed, but many genes have sex-specific expression prior to T secretion. Environmental factors, like endocrine disruptors and mimics, can interfere with sexual development. However, sex-specific ontogeny can be canalized by the production of epigenetic marks (epimarks) generated during early ontogeny that increase sensitivity of XY embryos to T and decrease sensitivity of XX embryos. Here, we integrate and synthesize the evidence indicating that canalizing epimarks are produced during early ontogeny. We will also describe the evidence that such epimarks sometimes carry over across generations and produce mosaicism in which some traits are discordant with the gonad. Such carryover epimarks are sexually antagonistic because they benefit the individual in which they were formed (via canalization) but harm opposite-sex offspring when they fail to erase across generations and produce gonad-trait discordances. SA-epimarks have the potential to: i) magnify phenotypic variation for many sexually selected traits, ii) generate overlap along many dimensions of the masculinity/femininity spectrum, and iii) influence medically important gonad-trait discordances like cryptorchidism, hypospadias and idiopathic hirsutism.

  • 10.
    Stenstrom, A.
    et al.
    Stenström, A., Department of Botany, Göteborg University, Box 461, S-405 30 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Olle, Jonsson B.
    Jonsdottir, I.S.
    Jónsdóttir, I.S., Department of Botany, Göteborg University, Box 461, S-405 30 Göteborg, Sweden, UNIS, PO Box 156, N-9171 Longyearbyen, Norway.
    Fagerstrom, T.
    Fagerström, T., Department of Theoretical Ecology, Lund University, Ecology Building, SE-223 62 Lund, Sweden.
    Augner, M.
    Swedish Polar Research Secretariat, PO Box 50005, SE-104 05 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Genetic variation and clonal diversity in four clonal sedges (Carex) along the Arctic coast of Eurasia2001In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 497-513Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied the structure of genetic variation (at both ramet- and genet-level) and clonal diversity within and among populations in the four closely related arctic clonal sedges Carex bigelowii, C. ensifolia, C. lugens and C. stans by use of allozyme markers. Compared to other sedges and arctic plants, the studied taxa all had high levels of genetic variation, both within populations and taxa. These taxa contained most of the total gene diversity (HT) within populations and a small part of the diversity among populations (GST ranged 0.05-0.43). Carex bigelowii had genetic variation (HS = 0.173, mean for populations) at a comparable level to other outbreeding arctic plants and to other widespread, rhizomatous and mainly outbreeding Carex species. In contrast, C. ensifolia (HS = 0.335), C. lugens (HS = 0.339) and C. stans (HS = 0.294) had within-population variations that were higher than in most other studied Carex species and for arctic plants in general. Genetic variation was not related to any tested environmental variable, but it was lower in areas deglaciated only 10 000 years BP compared to areas deglaciated 60 000 years BP or not glaciated at all during the Weichselian. All the populations were multiclonal, except for two populations of C. stans that were monoclonal. In contrast to genetic variation, clonal diversity decreased with latitude and did not differ between areas with different times of deglaciation. In accordance with previous studies, C. bigelowii and C. lugens were found to be outbreeding, while C. ensifolia and C. stans had mixed mating systems.

  • 11.
    Wright, Dominic
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Zoology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rubin, C-J
    Dept. of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, BMC, Uppsala University.
    Martinez Barrio, A
    Dept. of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital.
    Schütz, K
    Linnaeus Centre for Bioinformatics, Uppsala University.
    Kerje, S
    Dept. of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, BMC, Uppsala University.
    Brändström, H
    Dept. of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, BMC, Uppsala University.
    Kindmark, A
    Dept. of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, BMC, Uppsala University.
    Jensen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Zoology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, L
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Zoology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The genetic architecture of domestication in the chicken: effects of pleiotropy and linkage2010In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 19, p. 5140-5156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extent of pleiotropy and epistasis in quantitative traits remains equivocal. In the caseof pleiotropy, multiple quantitative trait loci are often taken to be pleiotropic if theirconfidence intervals overlap, without formal statistical tests being used to ascertain ifthese overlapping loci are statistically significantly pleiotropic. Additionally, the degreeto which the genetic correlations between phenotypic traits are reflected in thesepleiotropic quantitative trait loci is often variable, especially in the case of antagonisticpleiotropy. Similarly, the extent of epistasis in various morphological, behavioural andlife-history traits is also debated, with a general problem being the sample sizes requiredto detect such effects. Domestication involves a large number of trade-offs, which arereflected in numerous behavioural, morphological and life-history traits which haveevolved as a consequence of adaptation to selective pressures exerted by humans andcaptivity. The comparison between wild and domestic animals allows the geneticanalysis of the traits that differ between these population types, as well as being ageneral model of evolution. Using a large F2 intercross between wild and domesticatedchickens, in combination with a dense SNP and microsatellite marker map, bothpleiotropy and epistasis were analysed. The majority of traits were found to segregate in11 tight ‘blocks’ and reflected the trade-offs associated with domestication. These blockswere shown to have a pleiotropic ‘core’ surrounded by more loosely linked loci. Incontrast, epistatic interactions were almost entirely absent, with only six pairs identifiedover all traits analysed. These results give insights both into the extent of such blocks inevolution and the development of domestication itself.

  • 12.
    Xuereb, Amanda
    et al.
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Kimber, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Curtis, Janelle M. R.
    Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Canada.
    Bernatchez, Louis
    Univ Laval, Canada.
    Fortin, Marie-Josee
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Putatively adaptive genetic variation in the giant California sea cucumber (Parastichopus californicus) as revealed by environmental association analysis of restriction-site associated DNA sequencing data2018In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 27, no 24, p. 5035-5048Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the spatial scale of local adaptation and the factors associated with adaptive diversity are important objectives for ecology and evolutionary biology, and have significant implications for effective conservation and management of wild populations and natural resources. In this study, we used an environmental association analysis to identify important bioclimatic variables correlated with putatively adaptive genetic variation in a benthic marine invertebrate-the giant California sea cucumber (Parastichopus californicus)-spanning coastal British Columbia and southeastern Alaska. We used a redundancy analysis (RDA) with 3,699 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) obtained using RAD sequencing to detect candidate markers associated with 11 bioclimatic variables, including sea bottom and surface conditions, across two spatial scales (entire study area and within subregions). At the broadest scale, RDA revealed 59 candidate SNPs, 86% of which were associated with mean bottom temperature. Similar patterns were identified when population structure was accounted for. Additive polygenic scores, which provide a measure of the cumulative signal across all candidate SNPs, were strongly correlated with mean bottom temperature, consistent with spatially varying selection across a thermal gradient. At a finer scale, 23 candidate SNPs were detected, primarily associated with surface salinity (26%) and bottom current velocity (17%). Our findings suggest that environmental variables may play a role as drivers of spatially varying selection for P. californicus. These results provide context for future studies to evaluate the genetic basis of local adaptation in P. californicus and help inform the relevant scales and environmental variables for in situ field studies of putative adaptive variation in marine invertebrates.

1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf