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  • 1.
    Ayas Alikalfa, Ebru
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial ergonomics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Division of Industrial Ergonomics, STH, Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Ishihara, Shigekazu
    School of Psychological Science, Hiroshima International University, Hiroshima, Japan.
    Affective Design of Waiting Areas in Primary Healthcare2008In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274X, Vol. 20, no 4, 389-408 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper seeks to deal with affective design of waiting areas (servicescapes) and has twofold aims. The first, is to explore affective values for waiting areas. The second, is to identify interactions between physical design attributes and affective values.

    Design/methodology/approach – This study included a free association method for data collection, applying Kansei engineering methodology to extract design solutions relating to specific feelings. The study was undertaken at six primary health centres in Östergötland County, Sweden. In total, 88 participants (60 patients and 28 staff) were interviewed.

    Findings – The selected waiting areas show significant differences for their perceived affective qualities. The most desired feeling for creating affective values is found to be “calm”. The core design attributes contributing to this feeling are privacy, colours, child play-areas and green plants. Good design of lighting, seating arrangements and a low sound level are also important design attributes to give a more complete design solution.

    Research limitations/implications – The study provides useful insights for understanding affective needs in servicescapes, and it provides design suggestions. The results have not been analysed separately for gender or different age groups.

    Practical implications – The paper proposes a framework model to be applied when dealing with affective values in servicescapes.

    Originality/value – This paper makes an original contribution to understand affective values towards the physical environment in servicescape design. It offers a methodology to study complex environments with many alternative design solutions using limited resources. Moreover, this study uses a combination of a free association method and Rough Sets theory in affective design.

  • 2.
    Dahlgaard, Jens Jörn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Schütte, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ayas, E.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dahlgaard-Park, S. M.
    Institute of Service Managemnt, Lund University, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Kansei/affective engineering design: A methodology for profound affection and attractive quality creation2008In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274X, Vol. 20, no 4, 299-311 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of the paper is to present and discuss the Kansei engineering (KE) methodology, and to reflect on the future development of KE. The paper presents a model of the KE methodology and illustrates how this model was applied on a simple example which all may understand – design of a new chocolate bar.

    Design/methodology/approach – The research methodology is a combination of desk research (literature analysis), data collection, data analysis, reflections and model building.

    Findings – The paper suggests a structural model as a possible expanded framework for future Kansei/affective engineering research studies. According to the model profound affection is a result of the following six enabler factors: sensing experience; emotional experiences (Kansei); behavioural experiences/action; social experiences/interactions and relations; spiritual experiences/moral, ethics; intellectual experiences/cognition.

    Originality/value – The paper defines “Profound affection” as a very comprehensive state, which is a result of a combination of sensing, intellectual/cognitive, emotional, social, behavioural and spiritual experiences. “Profound affection” is not only a result of sensing or emotional experiences.

  • 3.
    Gregorio, Ruben
    et al.
    Delphi Diesel Systems, Barcelona, Spain.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Propia AB, Norrköping, Sweden.
    From expectations and needs of service customers to control chart specification limits2011In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274X, Vol. 23, no 2, 164-178 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The aim of this paper is to develop a model to help service organizations to set the specification limits according to the customer expectations.

    Design/methodology/approach – A review of relevant literature has been used to develop a new integrated model with ideas from the Kano model, SERVQUAL, Taguchi loss function, Importance Performance Analysis (IPA) and a new model, “the Trade-Off Importance”. A survey was carried out with 18 external customers and internal stakeholders of the Service Division of Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB in Finspong, Sweden.

    Findings – The model has demonstrated its robustness and credibility to set the specification limits. Additionally, it is a very powerful tool for service quality measurement and to set strategic directions.

    Research limitations/implications – First, articles published on this subject are few and there is no similar model in the literature to confirm or compare results. The proposed model must be further validated in future research. Second, this study is applied in a single service division, with a relatively small sample. Ideally, research should be conducted using multiple industries in order to ensure that the model is generalizable.

    Originality/value – To the best of one's knowledge, this paper is the first attempt to create a road-map to set the specification limits in services. Researchers should find that the proposed model fills the research gap. From a managerial standpoint the practical benefits in Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB suggest a new way of communicating to customers. The model will also improve the target setting in the Six Sigma projects.

  • 4.
    Hallberg, Anette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sipos-Zackrisson, Katarina
    Department of Educational Science in Arts and Professions (UTEP), Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Improvements of public library service quality: Perspective of libraries and study centres2010In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274X, Vol. 22, no 1, 89-100 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the improvement of library service quality in public libraries.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on two complementary studies and includes 58 interviews with managers, librarians and adult educators in Sweden and England. Together, they cover public libraries, study centres and adult education on an arena defined by stakeholders of the local municipality, county library, customer, governmental control systems and regional development council.

    Findings – Suggested improvements show that the potential for improving service quality of the Swedish library sector is related to the strength of its market orientation and to its ability to change the librarian's role. A change in the librarian role to a service-oriented and retail-experienced librarian, is reflected by the ability of the librarian to adapt to the process-oriented roles of the contact creator, the mentor/coach and the inspirer.

    Originality/value – The market orientation of the library services, customer orientation, together with a change to a retail-experienced librarian role, are actions identified for improving library customer value. The combination of market orientation including new customer groups and a new librarian role contribute to the improvement of library service quality.

  • 5.
    Löfgren, Martin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Karlstads universitet.
    Theory of Attractive Quality and  Lifecycles of Quality Attributes2011In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274X, Vol. 23, no 2, 235-246 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to shed further light on the dynamics of quality attributes, as suggested by the theory of attractive quality. The study aims to investigate the existence of the life cycle for successful quality attributes and to identify alternative life cycles of quality attributes.

    Design/methodology/approach – The research is based on two surveys in which a total of 1,456 customers (708 in 2003 and 748 in 2009) participated in the classification of quality attributes. In particular, the study investigated how customers perceived 24 particular packaging attributes at two points in time, in 2003 and 2009.

    Findings – The study identified three life cycles of quality attributes: successful quality attributes, flavor-of-the-month quality attributes, and stable quality attributes. The research also extends the theory of attractive quality by identifying the reverse movement of certain quality attributes; that is, that a quality attribute can take a step backwards in the life cycle of successful quality attributes through, for instance, a change in design.

    Originality/value – The paper provides empirical evidence for the existence of several alternative life cycles of quality attributes. The results of the empirical investigation increase the validity of the theory of attractive quality, which is important, given the limited amount of research that has attempted to validate the fundamentals of the theory of attractive quality.

  • 6.
    Pettersen, Jostein
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Managing Mobility for Learning, Health and Innovation (HELIX). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Defining lean production: some conceptual and practical issues2009In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274X, Vol. 21, no 2, 127-142 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the definition of lean production and the methods and goals associated with the concept as well as how it differs from other popular management concepts. '

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on a review of the contemporary literature on lean production, both journal articles and books.

    Findings – It is shown in the paper that there is no consensus on a definition of lean production between the examined authors. The authors also seem to have different opinions on which characteristics should be associated with the concept. Overall it can be concluded that lean production is not clearly defined in the reviewed literature. This divergence can cause some confusion on a theoretical level, but is probably more problematic on a practical level when organizations aim to implement the concept. This paper argues that it is important for an organization to acknowledge the different variations, and to raise the awareness of the input in the implementation process. It is further argued that the organization should not accept any random variant of lean, but make active choices and adapt the concept to suit the organization's needs. Through this process of adaptation, the organization will be able to increase the odds of performing a predictable and successful implementation.

    Originality/value – This paper provides a critical perspective on the discourse surrounding lean production, and gives an input to the discussion of the implementation of management models.

  • 7.
    Rönnbäck, Åsa
    et al.
    Division of Quality Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg.
    Witell, Lars
    Service Research Center, Karlstad University.
    Value creation in outsourced service provision in public transportation2009In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274X, Vol. 21, no 5, 517-529 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to identify and describe the perceived value drivers (benefits and sacrifices) in outsourced service provision in public transportation. The authors focus on the suppliers' perception of value creation for customers and value creation in a business-to-business relationship.

    Design/methodology/approach – In-depth interviews are conducted with 26 managers and employees participating in a business-to-business relationship concerning what create value following the critical incident technique.

    Findings – The results show that perceived benefits and sacrifices are related to the product, the service and the relationship. In addition, there are certain prerequisites in the public transportation system that inhibit value creation, and much value is destroyed in the business relationships before it reaches the passengers.

    Research limitations/implications – This paper reveals a need to find new quality strategies for the improvement and assurance of value creation in outsourced service provision. The value drivers identified originate from the suppliers' view.

    Practical implications – Managers should acquire knowledge regarding the value they create or destroy, both within their organisation and in their business network, and thus ultimately for their customers. Moreover, drivers that destroy value should be identified, measured, analysed, and managed.

    Originality/value – The paper contributes to a better understanding of the difficulties in creating value when service provision has been outsourced.

  • 8.
    Witell, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Löfgren, Martin
    Service Research Center, Karlstad University.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Service Research Center, Karlstad University.
    Identifying ideas of attractive quality in the innovation process2011In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274X, Vol. 23, no 1, 87-99 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to investigate whether and how new ideas generated by customers can be used in a process of attractive quality creation. In addition, it aims to discover whether ideas identified as attractive early in the innovation process have certain characteristics that separate them from other ideas.

    Design/methodology/approach – The study involved 30 customers of a company that designs and produces microwave ovens. In a number of experiments, these customers generated over 100 new ideas on functions, attributes and services related to microwave ovens. Company specialists identified the 21 best ideas and these ideas were then evaluated by a large customer group using the theory of attractive quality.

    Findings – The study shows how the theory of attractive quality can be used in the development of innovative products. It also provides empirical evidence that ideas identified as attractive are more original and of higher customer value than other ideas.

    Practical implications – The study shows the extent to which and the circumstances in which the theory of attractive quality can be used to evaluate ideas in the early phases of product and service development.

    Originality/value – Empirical research on attractive quality creation is sparse, and this study represents a rare example of a comprehensive study of attractive quality creation.

1 - 8 of 8
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