liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cuijpers, Pim
    VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Carlbring, Per
    University of Stockholm, Sweden.
    Riper, Heleen
    VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Leuphana University, Lünebrug, Germany.
    Hedman, Erik
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Guided Internet-based vs. face-to-face cognitive behavior therapy for psychiatric and somatic disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis2014In: World Psychiatry, ISSN 1723-8617, E-ISSN 2051-5545, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 288-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) has been tested in many research trials, but to a lesser extent directly compared to face-to-face delivered cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of trials in which guided ICBT was directly compared to face-to-face CBT. Studies on psychiatric and somatic conditions were included. Systematic searches resulted in 13 studies (total N=1053) that met all criteria and were included in the review. There were three studies on social anxiety disorder, three on panic disorder, two on depressive symptoms, two on body dissatisfaction, one on tinnitus, one on male sexual dysfunction, and one on spider phobia. Face-to-face CBT was either in the individual format (n=6) or in the group format (n=7). We also assessed quality and risk of bias. Results showed a pooled effect size (Hedges' g) at post-treatment of -0.01 (95% CI: -0.13 to 0.12), indicating that guided ICBT and face-to-face treatment produce equivalent overall effects. Study quality did not affect outcomes. While the overall results indicate equivalence, there are still few studies for each psychiatric and somatic condition and many conditions for which guided ICBT has not been compared to face-to-face treatment. Thus, more research is needed to establish equivalence of the two treatment formats.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Titov, Nickolai
    Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
    Advantages and limitations of Internet-based interventions for common mental disorders2014In: World Psychiatry, ISSN 1723-8617, E-ISSN 2051-5545, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 4-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several Internet interventions have been developed and tested for common mental disorders, and the evidence to date shows that these treatments often result in similar outcomes as in face-to-face psychotherapy and that they are cost-effective. In this paper, we first review the pros and cons of how participants in Internet treatment trials have been recruited. We then comment on the assessment procedures often involved in Internet interventions and conclude that, while online questionnaires yield robust results, diagnoses cannot be determined without any contact with the patient. We then review the role of the therapist and conclude that, although treatments including guidance seem to lead to better outcomes than unguided treatments, this guidance can be mainly practical and supportive rather than explicitly therapeutic in orientation. Then we briefly describe the advantages and disadvantages of treatments for mood and anxiety disorders and comment on ways to handle comorbidity often associated with these disorders. Finally we discuss challenges when disseminating Internet interventions. In conclusion, there is now a large body of evidence suggesting that Internet interventions work. Several research questions remain open, including how Internet interventions can be blended with traditional forms of care.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Titov, Nickolai
    Macquarie Univ, Australia.
    Dear, Blake F.
    Macquarie Univ, Australia.
    Rozental, Alexander
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; UCL, England.
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden; Univ Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Internet-delivered psychological treatments: from innovation to implementation2019In: World Psychiatry, ISSN 1723-8617, E-ISSN 2051-5545, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 20-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internet interventions, and in particular Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT), have existed for at least 20 years. Here we review the treatment approach and the evidence base, arguing that ICBT can be viewed as a vehicle for innovation. ICBT has been developed and tested for several psychiatric and somatic conditions, and direct comparative studies suggest that therapist-guided ICBT is more effective than a waiting list for anxiety disorders and depression, and tends to be as effective as face-to-face CBT. Studies on the possible harmful effects of ICBT are also reviewed: a significant minority of people do experience negative effects, although rates of deterioration appear similar to those reported for face-to-face treatments and lower than for control conditions. We further review studies on change mechanisms and conclude that few, if any, consistent moderators and mediators of change have been identified. A recent trend to focus on knowledge acquisition is considered, and a discussion on the possibilities and hurdles of implementing ICBT is presented. The latter includes findings suggesting that attitudes toward ICBT may not be as positive as when using modern information technology as an adjunct to face-to-face therapy (i.e., blended treatment). Finally, we discuss future directions, including the role played by technology and machine learning, blended treatment, adaptation of treatment for minorities and non-Western settings, other therapeutic approaches than ICBT (including Internet-delivered psychodynamic and interpersonal psychotherapy as well as acceptance and commitment therapy), emerging regulations, and the importance of reporting failed trials.

  • 4.
    Cuijpers, Pim
    et al.
    VU University and VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Sijbrandij, Marit
    VU University and VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Koole, Sander L
    VU University and VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Beekman, Aartjan T
    VU University and VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Reynolds, Charles F
    University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA, USA.
    Adding psychotherapy to antidepressant medication in depression and anxiety disorders: a meta-analysis2014In: World Psychiatry, ISSN 1723-8617, E-ISSN 2051-5545, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 56-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We conducted a meta-analysis of randomized trials in which the effects of treatment with antidepressant medication were compared to the effects of combined pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy in adults with a diagnosed depressive or anxiety disorder. A total of 52 studies (with 3,623 patients) met inclusion criteria, 32 on depressive disorders and 21 on anxiety disorders (one on both depressive and anxiety disorders). The overall difference between pharmacotherapy and combined treatment was Hedges' g = 0.43 (95% CI: 0.31-0.56), indicating a moderately large effect and clinically meaningful difference in favor of combined treatment, which corresponds to a number needed to treat (NNT) of 4.20. There was sufficient evidence that combined treatment is superior for major depression, panic disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The effects of combined treatment compared with placebo only were about twice as large as those of pharmacotherapy compared with placebo only, underscoring the clinical advantage of combined treatment. The results also suggest that the effects of pharmacotherapy and those of psychotherapy are largely independent from each other, with both contributing about equally to the effects of combined treatment. We conclude that combined treatment appears to be more effective than treatment with antidepressant medication alone in major depression, panic disorder, and OCD. These effects remain strong and significant up to two years after treatment. Monotherapy with psychotropic medication may not constitute optimal care for common mental disorders.

  • 5.
    Cuijpers, Pim
    et al.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands Leuphana University, Germany .
    Sijbrandij, Marit
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands .
    Koole, Sander L.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands .
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Beekman, Aartjan T.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands .
    Reynolds, Charles F.
    University of Pittsburgh, PA USA .
    The efficacy of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy in treating depressive and anxiety disorders: a meta-analysis of direct comparisons2013In: World Psychiatry, ISSN 1723-8617, E-ISSN 2051-5545, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 137-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although psychotherapy and antidepressant medication are efficacious in the treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders, it is not known whether they are equally efficacious for all types of disorders, and whether all types of psychotherapy and antidepressants are equally efficacious for each disorder. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies in which psychotherapy and antidepressant medication were directly compared in the treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders. Systematic searches in bibliographical databases resulted in 67 randomized trials, including 5,993 patients that met inclusion criteria, 40 studies focusing on depressive disorders and 27 focusing on anxiety disorders. The overall effect size indicating the difference between psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy after treatment in all disorders was g=0.02 (95% CI: -0.07 to 0.10), which was not statistically significant. Pharmacotherapy was significantly more efficacious than psychotherapy in dysthymia (g=0.30), and psychotherapy was significantly more efficacious than pharmacotherapy in obsessive-compulsive disorder (g=0.64). Furthermore, pharmacotherapy was significantly more efficacious than non-directive counseling (g=0.33), and psychotherapy was significantly more efficacious than pharmacotherapy with tricyclic antidepressants (g=0.21). These results remained significant when we controlled for other characteristics of the studies in multivariate meta-regression analysis, except for the differential effects in dysthymia, which were no longer statistically significant.

  • 6.
    Torous, John
    et al.
    Harvard Med Sch, MA 02115 USA.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bertagnoli, Andrew
    Optum, MN USA.
    Christensen, Helen
    Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Cuijpers, Pim
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Firth, Joseph
    Western Sydney Univ, Australia; Univ Manchester, England.
    Haim, Adam
    NIMH, MD 20892 USA.
    Hsin, Honor
    Verily Life Sci, CA USA.
    Hollis, Chris
    Univ Nottingham, England.
    Lewis, Shon
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Mohr, David C.
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60611 USA.
    Pratap, Abhishek
    Univ Washington, WA 98195 USA.
    Roux, Spencer
    Harvard Med Sch, MA 02115 USA.
    Sherrill, Joel
    NIMH, MD 20892 USA.
    Arean, Patricia A.
    Univ Washington, WA 98195 USA.
    Editorial Material: Towards a consensus around standards for smartphone apps and digital mental health in WORLD PSYCHIATRY, vol 18, issue 1, pp 97-982019In: World Psychiatry, ISSN 1723-8617, E-ISSN 2051-5545, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 97-98Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf