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  • 1.
    Andersson, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Larsson (Kaiser), Andréas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gradient Hydrogel Matrix for Microarray and Biosensor Applications: An Imaging SPR Study2009In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 142-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A biosensor matrix based on UV-initiated graft copolymerized poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate has been studied using imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR). By using a photo mask and a programmable shutter to vary the exposure time laterally, a gradient of matrix spots with physical thicknesses ranging from a few to tens of nanometers was generated. To maximize the dynamic range, imaging SPR was employed in wavelength interrogation mode. By finding the minimum in the reflectance spectra from each pixel of an image, SPR wavelength maps were constructed. The shift in SPR wavelength upon biospecific interaction was then measured both as a function of matrix thickness and composition. The performance of the matrix was evaluated in terms of immobilization of human serum albumin, biomolecular interaction with its antibody, and nonspecific binding of human fibrinogen. In addition, a low molecular weight interaction pair based on a synthetic polypeptide and calmodulin was also studied to explore the size selectivity of the hydrogel matrix. Our results show that the gradient matrix exhibits excellent properties for quick evaluation and screening of optimal hydrogel performance. The mixed hydrogel matrices display very low levels of nonspecific binding. It is also evident that the low molecular weight calmodulin is capable of freely diffusing and interacting throughout the entire hydrogel matrix, whereas the much larger albumin and its corresponding antibody, in particular, are partly/completely hindered from penetrating the interior of the matrix. This size-selectivity is attributed to a significant UV-initiated cross-linking or branching of the matrix during fabrication and/or protein mediated multipoint attachment during immobilization.

  • 2.
    Dånmark, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Aronsson, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tailoring Supramolecular Peptide-Poly(ethylene glycol) Hydrogels by Coiled Coil Self-Assembly and Self-Sorting2016In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 2260-2267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical hydrogels are extensively used in a wide range of biomedical applications. However, different applications require hydrogels with different mechanical and structural properties. Tailoring these properties demands exquisite control over the supramolecular peptides with different affinities for dimerization. Four different mechanical properties of hydrogels using de novo designed coiled coil interactions involved. Here we show that it is possible to control the nonorthogonal peptides, designed to fold into four different coiled coil heterodimers with dissociation constants spanning from mu M to pM, were conjugated to star-shaped 4-arm poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). The different PEG-coiled coil conjugates self-assemble as a result of peptide heterodimerization. Different combinations of PEG peptide conjugates assemble into PEG peptide networks and hydrogels with distinctly different thermal stabilities, supramolecular, and rheological properties, reflecting the peptide dimer affinities. We also demonstrate that it is possible to rationally modulate the self-assembly process by means of thermodynamic self-sorting by sequential additions of nonpegylated peptides. The specific interactions involved in peptide dimerization thus provides means for programmable and reversible self-assembly of hydrogels with precise control over rheological properties, which can significantly facilitate optimization of their overall performance and adaption to different processing requirements and applications.

  • 3.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Bergström, Gunnar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biotechnology .
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Conlan, Sheelagh L.
    Liu, Yunli
    Zhao, Qi
    DSouza, Fraddry
    Donnelly, GlenT.
    Willemsen, Peter R.
    Pettitt, Michala E.
    Callow, Maureen E.
    Callow, James A.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Poly(ethylene glycol)-Containing Hydrogel Surfaces for Antifouling Applications in Marine and Freshwater Environments2008In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 9, no 10, p. 2775-2783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 4.
    Larsson (Kaiser), Andréas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Du, Chun-Xia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    UV-patterned poly(ethylene glycol) matrix for microarray applications2007In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 8, no 11, p. 3511-3518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A versatile method to fabricate polymeric matrixes for microarray applications is demonstrated. Several different design strategies are presented where a variety of organic films, such as plastic polymers and self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on planar silica and gold substrates, act as supports for the graft polymerization procedure. An ensemble of poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate monomers are combined to obtain a matrix with desired properties:  low nonspecific binding and easily accessible groups for postimmobilization of ligands. The free radical graft polymerization process occurs under irradiation with UV light in the 254−266 nm range, which offers the possibility to introduce patterns by means of a photomask. The arrays are created on inert and homogeneous coatings prepared either by graft polymerization of a methoxy-terminated PEG−methacrylate or self-assembly of a methoxy-terminated oligo(ethylene glycol) thiol. Carboxylic acid groups, introduced in the array spots either during graft polymerization or upon wet chemical conversion of hydroxyls, grant the capability to immobilize proteins and other molecules via free amine groups. Immobilization of fluorescent species as well as biotin followed by exposure to a fluorescently labeled antibody directed toward biotin display both excellent integrity of the spots and low nonspecific binding to the surrounding framework. Beside patterns of uniform height and size, an array of spots with varying thickness (a sort of gradient) is demonstrated. Such gradient samples enable us to address critical issues regarding the mechanism(s) behind spatially resolved free radical polymerization of methacrylates. It also offers a convenient route to optimize the matrix properties with respect to thickness, loading capacity, protein diffusion/penetration, and nonspecific binding.

  • 5.
    Larsson (Kaiser), Andréas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Photografted poly(ethylene glycol) matrix for affinity interaction studies2007In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 287-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based matrix for studies of affinity interactions is developed and demonstrated. The PEG matrix, less than 0.1 μm thick, is graft copolymerized onto a cycloolefin polymer from a mixture of PEG methacrylates using a free radical reaction initiated by UV light at 254 nm. The grafting process is monitored in real time, and characteristics such as thickness, homogeneity, relative composition, photostability, and performance in terms of protein resistance in complex biofluids and sensor qualities are investigated with null ellipsometry, infrared spectroscopy, and surface plasmon resonance. The matrix is subsequently modified to contain carboxyl groups, thereby making it possible to immobilize ligands in a controlled and functional manner. Human serum albumin and fibrinogen are immobilized and successfully detected by antibody recognition using surface plasmon resonance. The results are encouraging and suggest that the PEG matrix is suitable for biochip and biosensor applications in demanding biofluids.

  • 6.
    Liu, Y
    et al.
    National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Canada.
    Griffith, M
    University of Ottawa, Eye Institute, Ottawa, Canada.
    Watsky, MA
    University of Tennessee Health Center, Memphis, Tennessee.
    Forrester, JV
    University of Aberdeen, Department of Ophthalmology, Institute of Medical Science, Aberdeen, Scotland.
    Kuffova, L
    University of Aberdeen, Department of Ophthalmology, Institute of Medical Science, Aberdeen, Scotland.
    Grant, D
    University of Ottawa, Eye Institute, Ottawa, Canada.
    Merrett, K
    National Research Council Canada and University of Ottawa, Eye Institute, Ottawa, Canada.
    Carlsson, DJ
    University of Ottawa, Department of Ophthalmology, Ottawa, Canada.
    Properties of porcine and recombinant human collagen matrices for optically clear tissue engineering applications2006In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 1819-1828Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Porcine and recombinant human atelocollagen I solutions were cross-linked with a water soluble carbodiimide at various stoichiometries and collagen concentrations (5-20 w/w %). The resulting hydrogels were clear and, when used as cell growth matrices, allowed cell and nerve visualization in vitro and in vivo. We have previously reported that, after six months of implantation in pigs and rabbits corneas, these robust hydrogels allowed regeneration of host cells and nerves to give optically clear corneas with no detected loss in thickness, indicating stable engraftment. Here, the biocompatible hydrogel formulations leading to this novel in vivo performance were characterized for amine consumption, gel hydration, thermal properties, optical clarity, refractive index, nutrient diffusion, biodegradation, tensile measurements, and average pore diameters. Gels with excellent in vitro (epithelial overgrowth, neurite penetration) and in vivo performance (clarity, touch sensitivity regeneration) had 4-11 nm pores, yet had glucose and albumin diffusive coefficients similar to mammalian corneas and allowed neurite extension through the gels.

  • 7.
    Tengdelius, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lee, Chyan-Jang
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Grenegård, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Påhlsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Synthesis and biological evaluation of fucoidan-mimetic glycopolymers through cyanoxyl-mediated free-radical polymerization2014In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 2359-2368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sulfated marine polysaccharide fucoidan has been reported to have health benefits ranging from antivirus and anticancer properties to modulation of high blood pressure. Hence, they could enhance the biological function of materials for biomedical applications. However, the incorporation of fucoidan into biomaterials has been difficult, possibly due to its complex structure and lack of suitable functional groups for covalent anchoring to biomaterials. We have developed an approach for a rapid synthesis of fucoidanmimetic glycopolymer chains through cyanoxyl-mediated free-radical polymerization, a method suitable for chain-end functionalizing and subsequent linkage to biomaterials. The resulting sulfated and nonsulfated methacrylamido alpha-L-fucoside glycopolymers fucoidan-mimetic properties were studied in HSV-1 infection and platelet activation assays. The sulfated glycopolymer showed similar properties to natural fucoidan in inducing platelet activation and inhibiting HSV-1 binding and entry to cells, thus indicating successful syntheses of fucoidan-mimetic glycopolymers.

1 - 7 of 7
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