liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Endre søk
Begrens søket
1 - 8 of 8
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Treff pr side
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
Merk
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Bergman, Karl-Olof
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Ekologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Jansson, Nicklas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Claesson, Kenneth
    County Administration Board of Östergötland, Linköping.
    Palmer, Michael W.
    Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, USA.
    Milberg, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Ekologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    How much and at what scale? Multiscale analyses as decision support for conservation of saproxylic oak beetles2012Inngår i: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, E-ISSN 1872-7042, Vol. 265, s. 133-141Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A key aspect for understanding species distributions is how they respond to habitat factors at different spatial scales. In this study we used a dataset mapping 33,000 large/hollow oaks, habitat for a guild of saproxylic beetles specialised on oaks at an extent of 10,000 km2. A total of 16 oak-dependent saproxylic species, out of 35, showed a clear relationship with substrate density at scales ranging from 52 m to ⩾5200 m. The characteristic scale of response for species richness of oak specialist species was 2284 m. At this scale, there was a tendency for richness to plateau at about 0.15 oaks ha−1, in which case about 250 hollow or large (circumference 310 cm) oaks would be needed in an area of 1600 ha to ensure a rich saproxylic oak fauna.

    The main general conclusions were: (i) a multi-scale approach is especially valuable to identify the characteristic scale of response; and that assuming a joint, single scale for all species may result in very poor decision support. (ii) The variation in species’ responses to substrate density at different scales means that habitat loss and fragmentation as well as management and restoration may have very different effects upon different species. (iii) Some species respond both to local and landscape scales, indicating that species occurrences in fragmented oak landscapes are affected both by short-term dynamics of the beetles and long term dynamics of the oak substrate. (iv) Maps, useful as decision support, can be constructed based on resource availability (in our case oak density) and characteristic scales.

  • 2.
    Bergner, Adam
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Avci, Mustafa
    Faculty of Forestry, Süleyman Demirel University, Isparta, Turkey.
    Eryigit, Hasan
    Isparta Province Forest District Directorate, Isparta, Turkey.
    Jansson, Nicklas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Niklasson, Mats
    Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, SLU, Alnarp, Sweden.
    Westerberg, Lars
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Milberg, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Influences of forest type and habitat structure on bird assemblagesof oak (Quercus spp.) and pine (Pinus spp.) stands in southwesternTurkey2015Inngår i: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, E-ISSN 1872-7042, Vol. 336, s. 137-147Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mediterranean basin exhibits a multitude of forest habitats affected by former and current exploitation and management. Recent afforestation programs have resulted in an increase in the proportion of coniferous trees, while oak stands, formerly utilized for coppicing and grazing, are abandoned or converted into coniferous plantations. The loss of oak stands might negatively affect birds dependent upon broadleaved forests. Studies confirming or rejecting that statement are scarce, particularly in the eastern part of the region. Using a study area in southwestern Turkey we applied a guild-based approach to investigate how pine and oak stands across a chronosequence differ in their capacity to support forest bird assemblages. Variables describing the vegetation were sampled to characterize the stands and relate bird assemblages to stand structure. Bird abundance and species richness was positively associated with age for both stand types. Richness and diversity was highest in oak stands, while there were no differences in bird abundance between the two forest types. Pine stands supported a different bird species composition compared to oak stands of the same age. Stand age and structure, rather than forest type, held the highest explanatory powers for bird assembly structure. Primary cavity-nesters and ground-nesters were more abundant in oak stands, possibly reflecting differences in stand structure and resource distribution. To support these birds with suitable habitats, oaks stands need conservation. Management practices in pine stands should strive for increasing the amount of old trees and retain vegetation in the understory to benefit breeding birds.

  • 3.
    Borjesson, G
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Microbiol, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden Forestry Res Inst Sweden, S-75183 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nohrstedt, HO
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Microbiol, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden Forestry Res Inst Sweden, S-75183 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fast recovery of atmospheric methane consumption in a Swedish forest soil after single-shot N-fertilization2000Inngår i: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, E-ISSN 1872-7042, Vol. 134, nr 1-3, s. 83-88Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Methane consumption was measured in samples from a Swedish forest soil once every autumn for 2 years after fertilization with 150 kg N ha(-1) as calcium ammonium-nitrate. Although fertilization initially depressed methane consumption, this effect tended to decline during the remainder of the first year, accompanied by the disappearance of inorganic N. After 2 years, the methane oxidation capacity was found to be substantially higher in the fertilized plots compared with the controls. The difference between years was pronounced, with very high rates registered 2 years after the start of the experiment. These high rates were probably due to a rapid growth of methanotrophic organisms in response to an unusually warm period preceding the date of sampling. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 4. Fagerström, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Larsson, Stig
    Lohm, Ulrik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Tenow, Olle
    Growth in Scots pine (Pinus silvesrtis L.): A hypothesis on response to Blastophagus piniperda L. (Col., Scolytidae) attacks1978Inngår i: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, E-ISSN 1872-7042, Vol. 1, s. 273-281Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 5.
    Ibbe, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Ekologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Milberg, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Ekologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Tunér, Albert
    Department of Crop Production Exology, SLU, Uppsala.
    Bergman, Karl-Olof
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Ekologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    History matters: impact of historical land use on butterfly diversity in clear-cuts in a boreal landscape2011Inngår i: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, E-ISSN 1872-7042, Vol. 261, nr 11, s. 1885-1891Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In Swedish boreal landscapes, the loss of species-rich semi-natural grasslands is largely due to a longhistory of agricultural abandonment. Large areas historically managed as meadows have become matureconiferous forest. This study focused on the potential biological legacy following a long period of grasslandabandonment. The butterfly fauna in clear-cuts which was historically meadows and abandoned longenough to allow a generation of conifers to mature (70–90 years) was compared with clear-cuts whichwere historically coniferous forest. The results showed that clear-cuts historically managed as meadowswere: (i) much richer in individuals, (ii) more species-rich, and (iii) contained many more grasslandspecialists than clear-cuts with a history as forest, with many of these species threatened in other partsof Europe.The results from our study demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that the legacy of historicalland-use in remnant plant communities can affect butterfly diversity in clear-cuts and hence the largescaledynamics over a timescale of a full tree rotation. The results of this study have implications for forestmanagement practices. Replanting clear-cuts on land that was previously meadows with deciduous treesor allowing the forest to regenerate naturally instead of planting conifers would make it possible topreserve a greater diversity of habitats for butterflies and other organisms.

  • 6.
    Milberg, Per
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Bergman, Karl-Olof
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Jonason, Dennis
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Karlsson, Jesper
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Westerberg, Lars
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Land-use history influence the vegetation in coniferous production forests in southern Sweden2019Inngår i: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, E-ISSN 1872-7042, Vol. 440, s. 23-30Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last centuries, land use in Europe intensified, which has led to a drastic decrease in the cover of semi-natural grasslands. In Sweden, much of the lost grasslands was turned into forest. This study investigated if species typical of managed grasslands could be found in coniferous production forests more than 80 years after grassland management ceased. Species and trait composition for plants was investigated in two types of forest differing in land use history (meadow in the 1870s or continuous coniferous forest), and in reference grasslands. The average plant species richness as well as the richness of grassland indicator species were 30% higher in forests with a history as meadow compared to in forests with a history as forest, hence clear signs of historical grassland management in todays forests. Compared with forests with continuous coniferous history, vegetation in forests with a meadow history tended to be more similar to reference grassland regarding both plant species and especially plant trait composition. The study provides proof of remnant grassland populations in coniferous production as the source for the biodiversity of clearcuts, rather than seed dispersal or seed bank survival. The result highlights the importance of land use for biodiversity of clearcuts, and points to the potential value of forests with a history of meadow in grassland conservation and restoration.

    Fulltekst tilgjengelig fra 2021-03-09 08:04
  • 7.
    Nordén, Björn
    et al.
    he Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, Oslo, Norway and Department of Biology and Environmental Science, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Paltto, Heidi
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Claesson, Christina
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Götmark, Frank
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Partial cutting can enhance epiphyte conservation in temperate oak-rich forests2012Inngår i: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, E-ISSN 1872-7042, Vol. 270, s. 35-44Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The strongly increasing demand for biofuel from forests poses new challenges for biodiversity conservation. Methods that may combine biofuel production with conservation goals need to be tested for various forest types. One possible conservation-oriented management alternative is partial cutting of closed canopy oak-rich forests (may also be called conservation thinning). Such cutting may counteract succession and restore a semi-open canopy structure, which may favor epiphytes. We evaluated this possibility by surveying the epiphyte community of lichens and bryophytes on large oaks in 24 oak-rich temperate forests in southern Sweden. Treatment plots, and reference plots with no cutting, were surveyed before, and 6 years after cutting. In the treatment plots, about 25% of the basal area was harvested, and mainly small and intermediate sized successional trees were removed. We detected significant positive effects of partial cutting on species density for both lichens and bryophytes. The additional variation in light influx at tree level (after the cutting) could not explain the change in species density. The increase in density of lichen species was highest on oaks with small trunk diameter and on oaks with deep bark crevices. The pooled frequency of species of conservation concern increased after the cutting, but the change in species composition was weak; colonization events occurred over mean minimum distances of 63.5 m to the nearest potential source tree (n = 22 events and 9 species). Overall, we found significantly higher colonization rates, and significantly lower extinction rates per tree for lichens in the treatment plots. We conclude that partial cutting influenced epiphytes of large oaks positively, as was the case for several other organism groups at the same study sites (previous studies). A mild form of biofuel harvesting may represent sustainable resource-use in these forests, compatible with conservation. However, part of the forest should be kept untouched for species vulnerable to changes in microclimatic conditions, and for evaluation of long-term effects.

  • 8.
    Petersson, Linda K.
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Milberg, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Bergstedt, Johan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Dahlgren, Jonas
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Felton, Annika M.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Gotmark, Frank
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Salk, Carl
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Lof, Magnus
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Changing land use and increasing abundance of deer cause natural regeneration failure of oaks: Six decades of landscape-scale evidence2019Inngår i: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, E-ISSN 1872-7042, Vol. 444, s. 299-307Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Many tree species worldwide are suffering from slow or failed natural regeneration with dramatic consequences for biodiversity and ecosystem services. However, it is difficult to disentangle the complex effects of factors influencing regeneration processes on long-lived tree species at large scales. In this study, we use long-term data from the Swedish National Forest Inventory (1953-2015) combined with deer hunting data (1960-2015) to reveal experimentally-intractable processes impeding oak (Quercus spp.) regeneration in southern Sweden. Oak-dominated ecosystems are widespread in northern temperate regions, where oaks are foundation species with disproportionate importance for biodiversity and ecosystem functions. Our study reveals that during the last six decades, oak tree numbers and standing volume have continuously increased, while natural regeneration of oak declined steeply after the early 1980s. We connect this decline to denser and darker forests, combined with increased abundance of deer. Land use changes during the six decades, such as abandonment of traditional practices and large-scale introduction of forest management oriented towards high volume production, led to continuously denser forests and thereby reduced the oak regeneration niche. In addition, the impact of changed game management was evident. This was particularly clear from a natural experiment on Gotland, a large island free of deer until roe deer were introduced in the late 20th century, at which point oak regeneration began a steep decline. At the stand level, natural oak regeneration could be expected to mainly occur in pulses after disturbance events, followed by a period of low regeneration success as the cohort ages. However, at a landscape scale one would expect a mix of successional stages that would even out such demographic patterns. A prolonged period of low regeneration at a landscape scale will eventually lead to a large gap in the oak size distribution as was observed in this study. This could eventually hurt the many species dependent on old and large oak trees. Active management to restore the oak regeneration niche, i.e. forest habitats with more light and less browsing pressure, therefore seems essential. The latter includes developing strategies that manage both deer populations and their available food across landscapes. Our study is the first to link oak regeneration failure to long-term changes in land use and increased deer populations at a landscape scale in this region. Furthermore, our study show how historical data can clarify confounded processes impacting long-lived forest species.

1 - 8 of 8
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf