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  • 1.
    Arvola, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Blomkvist, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wahlman, Fredrik
    Linköping University.
    Lifelogging in User Experience Research: Supporting Recall and Improving Data Richness2017In: Design journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 20, p. S3954-S3965Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of lifelogging is to help users collect data for self-monitoring and reflection. We have in this study explored how lifelogging technology (a camera and a heart rate monitor) can change user experience (UX) research, and we describe a novel approach. Data was collected for three days with four participants, and a 4-6-hours co-creation workshop with stimulated recall interview was held with each of them to create an experience timeline. The timeline includes selfreported key experiences, lifelog stimulated experiences, heart rate, decisions, and valence. The results show that the number of experiences in the timeline that come from data points stimulated by the lifelogging, are as many as the self-reported data points. Lessons learned include that the use of lifelogging produces highly detailed UX research, but it is very time consuming, due to the sheer amount of data.

  • 2.
    Blomkvist, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Segelström, Fabian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Benefits of External Representations in Service Design: a Distributed Cognition Perspective2014In: Design journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 331-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A defining characteristic of service design is the use of external representations, which support designers in making intangible aspects of services accessible and shareable. Both current and future states are externally represented, using different service design techniques, for the purposes of articulating insights, learning, communicating, collaborating, and maintaining empathy for customers. The purposes of, and techniques for, making external representations were compared with benefits of using external representations to think, suggested by the theory of distributed cognition. The analysis indicated that the service design techniques could be divided into two groups; definite and ongoing. The analysis also revealed that none of the included techniques explicitly supported designers in making multiple simultaneous representations of services. The research contributes knowledge about how the externalisations relate to benefits of making external representations, and about how to choose and use different service design techniques based on theories of distributed and situated cognition.

  • 3.
    Ekströmer, Philip
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wever, Renee
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ah, I see what you didn't mean2019In: Design journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 22, p. 1883-1897Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is often claimed that Computer Aided Design ( CAD) tools are unsuitable for design ideation as they are said to not support serendipitous interpretation, playfulness and creativity. However, this notion is based on anecdotal evidence and research that was done using CAD tools now considered obsolete. This study therefore aims to provide insights on the use of currently available CAD tools for design ideation. This was done by having three experts evaluate the use of pen- and- paper sketches and four different CAD tools for design ideation and discuss the results. The results from this study suggest that CAD tools have the potential to support serendipity and provide an environment for creativity and playfulness. There are several opportunities for the use of CAD tools in design ideation. This is certainly true in design fields where it is notoriously hard to make sketches, such as in lighting design.

  • 4.
    Esperance Rodrigues, Vanessa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Discovering Service Variations through Service Prototyping2017In: Design journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 20, p. S2247-S2257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing services require embracing the variability that makes it unique. This paper investigates how the use of a service prototyping technique enables participants to explore the variations inherent in services. The video data are analyzed using qualitative content analysis and the articulated variations are abstracted as categories. The resulting categories are then mapped across the service logic framework and the corresponding provider, joint and patient spheres. This paper aims to contribute to research on service prototyping by augmenting the use of prototyping methods to gain an understanding of the sources and possibly types of variations in a particular service. It clarifies how prototyping a service allows people untrained in design to diagnose variations that may occur in a future service and the decision-making process in accommodating variation. Further, the knowledge gained enables improved value co-creation opportunities in a service.

  • 5.
    Overkamp, Tim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ruijs, Freya
    JAM Visual Thinking, the Netherlands.
    Involving stakeholders towards service implementation: Co-designing change of practices using a visual language2017In: Design journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 20, no sup 1, p. 531-549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service implementation is complex and multifaceted. In this paper, wefocus on change of practices for actors in an organisation as one of these facets.Successful value co-creation requires different service actors to work together.Therefore, successful realisation of change of practices requires these actors to havea shared mental model of (consequences of) such change, both for themselves andfor the collaboration with other actors.We argue that collaborative development and use of a visual language can functionas boundary object that can facilitate conversations and development of sharedunderstanding regarding service implementation as change of practices, ifconnotative meaning of the words in the language is defined by those who use it.We use data from a workshop in the context of implementing a change of practicesto show how this can work and reflect on what role designers can have in thetransition towards service implementation.

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