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  • 1.
    Berggren, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karabag, Solmaz Filiz
    Södertörn University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Retraction, Dishonesty and Plagiarism: Analysis of a Crucial Issue for Academic Publishing, and the Inadequate Responses from Leading Journals in Economics and Management Disciplines2012In: Journal of Applied Economics and Business Research, ISSN 1927-033X, E-ISSN 1927-033X, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 172-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Academic dishonesty and plagiarism have become hot issues in newspapers and academia. However, there are few studies of how leading journals are handling these issues. Therefore the purpose of this paper is to analyze the current situation and policies concerning academic dishonesty, plagiarism and paper retractions in academia in general, and business and economics disciplines in particular. Four databases, Ebsco Business Source Premier, Emerald, JSTOR and ScienceDirect, have been examined. This survey shows that while some science journals, e.g. medical journals, are very active in retracting papers due to the dishonesty and plagiarism, business and economics journals are not. The survey also displays that some journals have already published explicit policies regarding academic honesty; within the business field, however, only two established and one emerging journal discuss such policies. Given the extent of the problem, it seems important that more journals openly confront the situation, elaborate and publish explicit policies how to reduce the future occurrence of academic dishonesty and plagiarism.

  • 2.
    Imre, Özgün
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Adopting Information Systems in a Small Company: A Longitudinal Study.2016In: Journal of Applied Economics and Business Research, ISSN 1927-033X, E-ISSN 1927-033X, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 269-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For some time there has been an increase in adoption of enterprise systems by small companies. With welldocumented potential benefits, there are a lot of reasons to adopt them. In this study however the choice to adopt smaller pieces of information systems by a small organization is investigated to provide a counter example to the integrated-solution literature. With the intention to adopt an enterprise system at the beginning, the case provides a dynamic story of a small organization and how various factors impacted on the intention and resulted in an assemblage of information systems instead. By adoption the technology-organisation-environment framework and a single case study design, the case indicates that in addition to the oft-cited factors such as organisational size and IT readiness, social norms and the characteristics of a central individual, such as the owner, play a prominent role in information systems adoption, and highlights how these factors are connected to each other. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

  • 3.
    Karabag, Solmaz Filiz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Borah, Dhruba Jyoti
    Alliance Manchester Business School, University of Manchester, UK.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Separation or Integration for Successful Acquisition?: A Comparative Study of Established and Emerging Economies' Firms2018In: Journal of Applied Economics and Business Research, ISSN 1927-033X, E-ISSN 1927-033X, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of the post-acquisition practices of established economy firms argue that integration is one of the most important factors that drives acquisition performance. Recent research suggests that firms from emerging economies may use different approaches in their acquisitions. However, there is a lack of studies of the post-acquisition strategies of emerging economy firms. This study presents an in-depth case study of the strategy of an emerging economy firm from a large business group after its acquisition of a classical brand-name company in a developed economy. Moreover, this strategy and its performance outcomes is compared with the strategy of the acquired firm´s previous owner, an established MNE from a leading OECD country. The study reveals that the emerging economy firm, Tata Motors, pursued a consistent separation strategy in all the investigated areas – human resource management, new product development, production, and marketing. Moreover, this separation strategy turned out to be much more successful than the integration strategy pursued by the previous owner, Ford Motors.

  • 4.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    From Product Development to Production: On the Complexity of Geographical adn Organizational Dispersion2012In: Journal of Applied Economics and Business Research, ISSN 1927-033X, E-ISSN 1927-033X, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 125-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The establishment of low cost production facilities in emerging economies in Asia and Eastern-Europe has resulted in an increased organizational and geographical separation of product development and production processes. This paper elaborates on the complexity of the product development to production interface in dispersed environments and describes two different logics underlying the coordination of the product development to production transition in relation to interface complexity. The paper is based on two case studies of in total three different projects. It is argued that product/process related factors as well as organizational/geographical related factors are important in determining interface complexity. Further, a high degree of interface complexity calls for a predominant knowledge integration logic complemented with some measures of standardization in the product development to production interface. A low degree of interface complexity may be managed by a predominant task partitioning logic complemented with some integration measures.

  • 5.
    Moreno, Rodrigo
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Management of the Level of Coursework in PhD Education: A Case of Sweden2014In: Journal of Applied Economics and Business Research, ISSN 1927-033X, E-ISSN 1927-033X, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 168-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PhD programs around the world include a variable amount of coursework. Using a curriculum design perspective, this paper explores the pros and cons of using different levels of coursework in PhD education. Inefficient management of coursework can jeopardize the quality of the PhD programs, since the students will be forced to devote less time to their research. On the contrary, coursework can also become a powerful teaching and learning activity that can help the PhD students to attain the intended learning outcomes of the program. However, a deep involvement of the administration and supervisors in the design of coursework is necessary for the latter case. Although the paper uses the Swedish system as a reference, most of the discussion is well applicable to most PhD programs elsewhere.

  • 6.
    Swartling, Dag
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Management Initiation of Continuous Improvement from a Motivational Perspective2013In: Journal of Applied Economics and Business Research, ISSN 1927-033X, E-ISSN 1927-033X, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 81-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many continuous improvement (CI) initiatives fail since management is unsuccessful in motivating the employees to actively participate in CI activities. In such cases CI often is run by managers and the power of wide participation is lost. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mechanisms behind motivating employees to participate in CI work. The paper is based on findings from three different cases of highly successful CI organizations within different areas. The findings are that the mechanisms behind motivation for CI can be divided into respect for people and improvement system organization. Within respect for people, there need to be meaningfulness and trust, employees need to be seen as individuals, be given problem based training and education, and be given increased authority and responsibility. Within the organization of the improvement system, crucial areas are: Communication; visualization; and cross-functional, cross-professional improvement work. The paper not only shows which areas are important but explains why they are important from a motivation-theory perspective.

1 - 6 of 6
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Citation style
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