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  • 1.
    Collste, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Arts and Humanities. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rectification for Atrocities under Colonialism2016In: Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, ISSN 1369-801X, E-ISSN 1469-929X, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 852-864Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wars and injustices can have wide-ranging reverberations. Colonialism ended – with a few exceptions – over fifty years ago, but there are still many traces left. In this essay I focus on two cases of atrocities under colonialism that have left scars in the present and my question is: how can a nation rectify for the long-term effects of an aggression? What is the appropriate ethical response? The two examples are the German genocide of the Herero tribe in 1904–1905 and the British war against the Mau Mau movement in Kenya in the 1950s. The examples are chosen because they both illustrate enduring claims for rectification after aggressions. After the presentation of these cases and of how Germany and Great Britain have responded, I discuss the meaning of rectificatory justice and criteria for reasonable claims for rectification.

  • 2.
    Hansen, Peo
    et al.
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jonsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bringing Africa as a 'Dowry to Europe': European Integration and the Eurafrican Project, 1920–19602011In: Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, ISSN 1369-801X, E-ISSN 1469-929X, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 443-463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the history of the ‘Eurafrican project’ as it evolved from the Pan-European movement in the 1920s to its institutionalization in the European Economic Community (EEC) (i.e. today’s EU) in the late 1950s. As shown in the article practically all of the visions, movements and concrete institutional arrangements working towards European integration during this period placed Africa’s incorporation into the European enterprise as a central objective. As so much of the scholarly, political and journalistic accounts at the time testify to, European integration was inextricably bound up with a Eurafrican project. According to the intellectual, political and institutional discourse on Eurafrica – or the fate of Europe’s colonial enterprise – a future European community presupposed the transformation of the strictly national colonial projects into a joint European colonization of Africa. Indeed, there is strong evidence to support that these ideas were instrumental in the actual, diplomatic and political constitution of the EEC, or of Europe as a political subject. The article discusses the conspicuous absence of these matters from scholarship on European integration and its historical origins and trajectory. It also notes that it is equally neglected in postcolonial studies, which should be able to provide the theoretical and historical tools to engage with the complex and instructive issues with which the Eurafrican project and its intimate links to the history of European integration confront today’s scholars.

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