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  • 1.
    Ahn, Song-Ee
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rimpiläinen, Sanna
    University of Gothenburg.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Fenwick, Tara
    University of Stirling.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Learning in Technology-Enhanced Medical Simulation:Locations and Knowings2015In: Professions & Professionalism, ISSN 1893-1049, E-ISSN 1893-1049, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This qualitative study focuses on how knowings and learning take place in full-scale simulation training of medical and nursing students, by drawing upon actor-network theory (ANT). ANT situates materiality as a part of the social practic-es. Knowing and learning, according to ANT, are not simply cognitive or social phenomena, but are seen as emerging as effects of the relation between material assemblages and human actors being performed into being in particular locations. Data consists of observations of simulations performed by ten groups of students. The analysis focuses on the emerging knowings in the socio-material—arrangements of three locations involved in the simulation—the simulation room, the observation room and the reflection room. The findings indicate that medical knowing, affective knowing and communicative knowing are produced in different ways in the different locations and material arrangements of the simulation cycle.

  • 2.
    Bejerot, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology.
    Hasselbladh, Hans
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Forsberg Kankkunen, Tina
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Occupational Control on Drift—National and Local Intervention in Clinical Work at Emergency Departments2017In: Professions & Professionalism, ISSN 1893-1049, E-ISSN 1893-1049, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Swedish emergency departments, various initiatives have been introduced in order to reduce long waiting times for patients: lean methods, targets for waiting times related to revenues, interprofessional teams, and different forms of triage systems. This study focuses on the physicians’ views on dilemmas related to these interventions. The study is based on the interviews with 14 physicians in four emergency departments. The interviews have been analysed thematically and presented in the form of brief narratives. The study follows changes from clinical practice to the national policy level. The changes appear to be ineffective or counterproductive—waiting times are rather getting longer, but the measures have a number of other effects. Decisions are taken at a central level and are carried out by means of rules, incentives, and projects and end in the medical profession being displaced from the central position they have held in the working processes of health care.

  • 3.
    Lindh Falk, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hopwood, Nick
    University of Technology, Sydney, Australia.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Unfolding Practices: A Sociomaterial View of Interprofessional Collaboration in Health Care2017In: Professions & Professionalism, ISSN 1893-1049, E-ISSN 1893-1049, Vol. 7, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: Knowledge sharing is an essential part of interprofessional practice and will be even more important in the future in regard to the opportunities and chal-lenges in practices for delivering safe and effective healthcare. The aim of this ethnographic study was to explore how professional knowledge can be shared in an interprofessional team at a spinal cord injury rehabilitation unit. A sociomaterial per-spective on practice was used to analyse the data, and by theorizing upon this, we captured different aspects of interprofessional collaboration in health care. The find-ings illuminate how knowledge emerges and is shared between professionals, and how it passes along as chain of actions between professionals, in various ways. The findings offer a novel perspective on how interprofessional collaboration as a prac-tice, involving ongoing learning, unfolds. This reveals the mechanisms by which different forms of expertise are mobilized between professions as health care work.

  • 4.
    Reichenpfader, Ursula
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wickström, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Carlfjord, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Medi(c)ation work in the emergency department: Making standardized practice work2018In: Professions & Professionalism, ISSN 1893-1049, E-ISSN 1893-1049, Vol. 8, no 2, article id e2298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Medication review, the systematic examination of an individual patient’s medicines in order to improve medication therapy, has been advocated as an important patient safety measure. Despite widespread use, little is known about how medication review is conducted when implemented in routine health care. Drawing from an ethnographic case study in a Swedish emergency department and using a practice-based approach, we examine how medication review is practically accomplished and how knowledge is mobilized in everyday practice. We show how physicians construct and negotiate medication safety through situated practices and thereby generate knowledge through mundane activities. We illustrate the centrality of practitioners’ collective reflexive work when co-constructing meaning and argue here that practitioners’ local adaptations can serve as important prerequisites to make “standardized” practice function in everyday work. Organizations need to build a practical capacity to support practitioners’ work-based learning in messy and time-pressured  health care  settings.

  • 5.
    Svensson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Åström, Karsten
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Field of Social Regulation: How the State Creates a Profession2013In: Professions & Professionalism, ISSN 1893-1049, E-ISSN 1893-1049, Vol. 3, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes the process of professionalisation in the field of social control in Sweden. The aim is to analyse how the state by legislation created the profession of social workers for local social services and thus for social control by public administration. We show how organisations for social work have developed and played an important role since the 19th century and that social investigation should be seen as a hub for the practice. The work now mediated though professional organisations was initially performed by volunteers. In the early 20th century, volunteers and employed social workers cooperated, where social investigation was a central task for social workers. In the 1960s and ‘70s, more social workers were educated, the importance of social investigation was highlighted, and volunteers became subordinated to paid social workers. The legal professions have throughout the process had a role in making decisions, but not in the performance of investigating or executing procedures.

  • 6.
    Thörne, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hult, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Andersson Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The Dynamics of Physicians’ Learning and Support of Others’ Learning2014In: Professions & Professionalism, ISSN 1893-1049, E-ISSN 1893-1049, Vol. 4, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning has been defined as a condition for improving the quality of healthcare practice. The focus of this paper is on physicians’ learning and their support of others’ learning in the context of Swedish healthcare. Data were generated through individual and focus group interviews and analyzed from a socio-material practice theory perspective. During their workday, physicians dynamically alternated between their own learning and their support of others’ learning in individual patient processes. Learning and learning support were interconnected with the versatile mobility of physicians across different contexts and their participation in multiple communities of collaboration and through tensions between responsibilities in healthcare. The findings illustrate how learning enactments are framed by the existing “practice architectures.” We argue that productive reflection on dimensions of learning enactments in practice can enhance physicians’ professional learning and improve professional practice.

1 - 6 of 6
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