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  • 1.
    Andersson, Marine L
    et al.
    Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm,.
    Böttiger, Ylva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Kockum, Henrik
    3Department of.
    Eiermann, Birgit
    Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm,.
    High Prevalence of Drug-Drug Interactions in Primary Health Care is Caused by Prescriptions from other Healthcare Units.2018In: Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology, ISSN 1742-7835, E-ISSN 1742-7843, Vol. 122, no 5, p. 512-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drug-drug interactions are increasingly common, as patients are getting older and the number of drugs per patient is increasing. In this study, we investigated to which extent potential drug-drug interactions originated from single or multiple prescribers. All patients attending any of 20 primary healthcare centres were included in a retrospective observational cohort study. Data on all prescriptions to these patients, irrespectively of the prescriber, were collected for two 4-month periods. Potential drug interactions were identified using the drug-drug interaction database SFINX. Interactions were classified with respect to the workplace of the prescriber, and the prevalence of interactions according to origin was analysed. We found that the drug interactions were significantly more common when the drugs were prescribed from different healthcare centres, compared with drugs prescribed from the patients' primary healthcare centre only. One explanation for this increased risk of drug interactions could be that the prescribers at different primary healthcare centres do not share the same information concerning the total medication list of the patient.

  • 2.
    Bastami, Salumeh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gupta, A.
    Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Zackrisson, Anna Lena
    Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Linköping, Sweden .
    Ahlner, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Osman, Abdimajid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Uppugunduri, Srinivas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Influence of UGT2B7, OPRM1 and ABCB1 gene polymorphisms on morphine use2014In: Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology, ISSN 1742-7835, E-ISSN 1742-7843, Vol. 115, no 5, p. 423-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Therapeutic modulation of pain with morphine and other opioids is associated with significant variation in, both, effects and adverse effects in individual patients. Many factors including gene polymorphisms have been shown to contribute to the interindividual variability in the response to opioids. The aim of this study was to investigate the significance of UGT2B7, OPRM1 and ABCB1 polymorphisms for interindividual variability in morphine induced analgesia in patients undergoing hysterectomy. The frequency of these polymorphisms was also investigated in forensic autopsy cases as morphine is also a very commonly abused drug

    Blood samples were collected from 40 patients following abdominal hysterectomy, 24 hours after initiation of analgesia through a PCA pump. Samples were genotyped and analysed for morphine and its metabolites. We also genotyped approximately 200 autopsy cases found positive for morphine in routine forensic analysis.

    Patients homozygous for UGT2B7 802C needed significantly lower dose of morphine for pain relief. The same trend was observed for patients homozygous for ABCB1 1236T and 3435T, as well as to OPRM1 118A. Dose of morphine in patients included in this study was significantly related to variation in UGT2B7 T802C. Age was significantly related to both dose and concentration of morphine in blood.

    Regression analysis showed that 30% of differences in variation in morphine dose could be explained by SNPs in these genes. The genotype distribution was similar between the forensic cases and the patients. However, the mean concentration of morphine was higher in forensic cases compared to patients.

    We conclude that gene polymorphisms contribute significantly to the variation in morphine levels observed in individual patients.

  • 3.
    Bergmann, Troels K
    et al.
    University of Queensland.
    Brasch-Andersen, Charlotte
    University of So Denmark.
    Green, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mirza, Mansoor R
    Odense University Hospital.
    Skougaard, Kristin
    Herlev Hospital.
    Wihl, Jessica
    Lund Hospital.
    Keldsen, Nina
    Herning Hospital.
    Damkier, Per
    Odense University Hospital.
    Peterson, Curt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Vach, Werner
    Institute Medical Biometry and Medical Informat, Freiburg.
    Brosen, Kim
    University of So Denmark.
    Impact of ABCB1 Variants on Neutrophil Depression: A Pharmacogenomic Study of Paclitaxel in 92 Women with Ovarian Cancer2012In: Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology, ISSN 1742-7835, E-ISSN 1742-7843, Vol. 110, no 2, p. 199-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The standard treatment for ovarian cancer in advanced stages is post-surgery treatment with taxane-platin chemotherapy. Despite an initial high response rate, most patients eventually relapse. The dose-limiting toxicities of paclitaxel are neutropenia and neuropathy, but the inter-individual variability is large. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the impact of genetic variants in key drug metabolizing/transporter genes on toxicity and compliance. CYP2C8*3 and three ABCB1 polymorphisms were chosen for primary analysis, and a host of other candidate genes was explored in 92 prospectively recruited Scandinavian Caucasian women with primary ovarian cancer who were treated with paclitaxel and carboplatin. A single investigator assessed the clinical toxicity in 97% of the patients. Patients carrying variant alleles of ABCB1 C3435T experienced more pronounced neutrophil decrease (63%, 72% and 80% for 3435CC, CT and TT, respectively; p-value 0.03). A similar association was found for G2677T /A, p-value 0.02. For C1236T, there was a trend with p-value 0.06. No statistically significant correlations were found for paclitaxel compliance and sensory neuropathy in the primary analysis. Variants in the drug transporter ABCB1 gene are possibly associated with the neutrophil suppressing effect of paclitaxel in patients with ovarian cancer. This finding has implications for the understanding of bone marrow suppression and future tailored chemotherapy.

  • 4.
    Björn, Niclas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jakobsen Falk, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Vergote, Ignace
    Leuven Canc Inst, Belgium.
    Green, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    ABCB1 Variation Affects Myelosuppression, Progression-free Survival and Overall Survival in Paclitaxel/Carboplatin-treated Ovarian Cancer Patients2018In: Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology, ISSN 1742-7835, E-ISSN 1742-7843, Vol. 123, no 3, p. 277-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The standard chemotherapy for ovarian cancer is paclitaxel/carboplatin. Patients often exhibit myelosuppressive toxicity, and the treatment response varies considerably. In this study, we investigated the previously reported SNPs 1199Gamp;gt;A (rs2229109), 1236Camp;gt;T (rs1128503), 2677Gamp;gt;T/A (rs2032582), 3435Camp;gt;T (rs1045642) in ABCB1, and 1196Aamp;gt;G (rs10509681) in CYP2C8 and their association with treatment-induced myelosuppression, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). From the phase III study, OAS-07OVA, 525 patients (All) treated with carboplatin and paclitaxel administered as Paclical (Arm A, n=260) or Taxol((R)) (Arm B, n=265) were included and genotyped using pyrosequencing. Genotype associations with myelosuppression, PFS and OS were investigated using anova, Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models. The most prominent finding was for the ABCB1 variant 3435TT, which was significantly associated with increased PFS in All (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.623), in Arm A (HR=0.590) and in Arm B (HR=0.627), as well as increased OS in All (HR=0.443) and in Arm A (HR=0.372) compared to the wild-type, 3435CC. For toxicity, the most interesting finding concerned the haplotype, including 1236TT, 2677TT and 3435TT, which was associated with higher neutrophil values in Arm B (p=0.039) and less neutrophil decrease in All (p=0.048) and in Arm B (p=0.021). It is noteworthy that the results varied depending on the treatment arm which indicates that the effects of ABCB1 variants vary with the treatment regimen. Our results reflect the contradictory results of previous studies, confirming that small variations in the composition of treatment regimens and patient populations may influence the interpretation of SNPs effects on treatment outcome.

  • 5.
    Efsen, Eva
    et al.
    Department of Gastroenterology, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark.
    Saermark, Torben
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care.
    Hansen, Alastair
    Department of Pathology, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark.
    Bruun, Eywin
    Department of Gastroenterology, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark.
    Brynskov, Jörn
    Department of Gastroenterology, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark.
    Ramiprilate Inhibits Functional Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Crohns Disease Fistulas2011In: Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology, ISSN 1742-7835, E-ISSN 1742-7843, Vol. 109, no 3, p. 208-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, -3 and -9 has been demonstrated in Crohns disease fistulas, but it is unknown whether these enzymes are biologically active and represent a therapeutic target. Therefore, we investigated the proteolytic activity of MMPs in fistula tissue and examined the effect of inhibitors, including clinically available drugs that beside their main action also suppress MMPs. Fistula specimens were obtained by surgical excision from 22 patients with Crohns disease and from 10 patients with fistulas resulting from other causes. Colonic endoscopic biopsies from six controls were also included. Total functional MMP activity was measured by a high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based, fluorogenic MMP-substrate cleavage assay, and the specific activity of MMP-2, -3 and -9 by the MMP Biotrak Activity Assay. The MMP inhibitors comprised ethylene-diamine-tetraacetic acid (EDTA), the synthetic broad-spectrum inhibitor, GM6001, the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, ramiprilate, and the tetracycline, doxycycline. In Crohns disease fistulas, about 50% of the total protease activity was attributable to MMP activity. The average total MMP activity was significantly higher (about 3.5-times) in Crohns fistulas (471 FU/mu g protein, range 49-2661) compared with non-Crohns fistulas [134 FU/mu g protein, range 0-495, (p andlt; 0.05)] and normal colon [153 FU/mu g protein, range 77-243, (p andlt; 0.01)]. MMP-3 activity was increased in Crohns fistulas (1.4 ng/ml, range 0-9.83) compared with non-Crohns fistulas, [0.32 ng/ml, range 0-2.66, (p andlt; 0.02)]. The same applied to MMP-9 activity [0.64 ng/ml, range 0-5.66 and 0.17 ng/ml, range 0-1.1, respectively (p andlt; 0.04)]. Ramiprilate significantly decreased the average total MMP activity level by 42% and suppressed the specific MMP-3 activity by 72%, which is comparable to the effect of GM6001 (87%). Moreover, MMP-9 activity was completely blunted by ramiprilate. Doxycycline had no effect on MMP activity. Increased functional MMP activity, notably MMP-3 and -9, is present in Crohns fistulas and may be inhibited by ramiprilate, a widely available ACE inhibitor.

  • 6.
    Green, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Oncology Centre.
    Mirghani, Rajaa A
    Karolinska University .
    Rymark, Per
    Västerås Hospital.
    Åvall Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Karolinska University Hospital.
    Peterson, Curt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Oncology Centre.
    Pharmacogenetic Studies of Paclitaxel in the Treatment of Ovarian Cancer2009In: Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology, ISSN 1742-7835, E-ISSN 1742-7843, Vol. 104, no 2, p. 130-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of sequence variants in the CYP2C8, ABCB1 and CYP3A4 genes and the CYP3A4 phenotype for the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of paclitaxel in ovarian cancer patients. Thirty-eight patients were treated with paclitaxel and carboplatin. The genotypes of CYP2C8*1B, *1C, *2, *3, *4, *5, *6, *7, *8 and P404A, ABCB1 G2677T/A and C3435T, as well as CYP3A4*1B, were determined by pyrosequencing. Phenotyping of CYP3A4 was performed in vivo with quinine as a probe. The patients were monitored for toxicity and 23 patients underwent a more extensive neurotoxicity evaluation. Patients heterozygous for G/A in position 2677 in ABCB1 had a significantly higher clearance of paclitaxel than most other ABCB1 variants. A lower clearance of paclitaxel was found for patients heterozygous for CYP2C8*3 when stratified according to the ABCB1 G2677T/A genotype. In addition, the CYP3A4 enzyme activity in vivo affected which metabolic pathway was dominant in each patient, but not the total clearance of paclitaxel. The exposure to paclitaxel correlated to the degree of neurotoxicity. Our findings suggest that interindividual variability in paclitaxel pharmacokinetics might be predicted by ABCB1 and CYP2C8 genotypes and provide useful information for individualized chemotherapy.

  • 7.
    Karlsson, Louise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Mikael
    National Board Forens Med, Department Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, SE-58758 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Kronstrand, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kugelberg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mephedrone, Methylone and 3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) Induce Conditioned Place Preference in Mice2014In: Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology, ISSN 1742-7835, E-ISSN 1742-7843, Vol. 115, no 5, p. 411-416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade, there has been a worldwide increase in popularity and abuse of synthetic cathinones. Common ingredients of the so-called bath salts include mephedrone, methylone and 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV). Relatively little information about the pharmacology and addiction potential of these drugs is available. We used the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm to explore the reinforcing effects of three different synthetic cathinones. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether mephedrone, methylone and MDPV induce CPP in mice. The secondary aims were to investigate a possible dose-response CPP and whether the synthetic cathinones induce higher CPP than amphetamine at equal dose. C57BL/6 mice were conditioned to mephedrone, methylone, MDPV and amphetamine at doses of 0.5, 2, 5, 10 or 20mg/kg (i.p.). During the conditioning, the mice received two training sessions per day for 4days. All four tested drugs showed a significant place preference compared with controls. Mice conditioned with MDPV (5 and 10mg/kg) displayed a greater preference score compared to mice conditioned with amphetamine (5 and 10mg/kg). Our findings show that mephedrone, methylone and MDPV produce CPP equal or higher than amphetamine strongly suggesting addictive properties. Given the public health concern of abuse, future pharmacological studies are necessary to fully understand the effects of these drugs.

  • 8.
    Kugelberg, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Apelqvist, G
    Klinisk farmakologi Lund.
    Wikell, C
    Klinisk farmakologi Lund.
    Bengtsson, Finn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Open-field behavioural alterations in liver-impaired and sham-operated rats after acute exposure to the antidepressant venlafaxine2005In: Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology, ISSN 1742-7835, E-ISSN 1742-7843, Vol. 97, no 3, p. 155-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with chronic liver impairment often display symptoms of affective psychiatric nature where the choice for antidepressant treatment is rational. Since caution is recommended when these drugs are used in such patients, a dose reduction is usually performed. We have previously reported that a dose reduction to liver-impaired portacaval shunted rats has resulted in similar brain concentrations of venlafaxine as compared to sham-operated control rats that received a two times higher dose. The main aim of the present study was therefore to investigate if this "normalisation" in pharma-cokinetics of the portacaval-shunted rats also was true for the pharmacodynamic response in terms of drug effect on spontaneous open-field behaviour. Thus, portacaval-shunted rats received a single reduced dose (5 mg/kg) of venlafaxine or saline, whereas sham-operated rats received either 10 mg/kg or saline. Thereafter, central and peripheral arena locomotor and rearing activities were recorded during 60 min. The venlafaxine-treated portacaval-shunted and sham rats displayed reduced and unchanged overall behavioural activities compared with corresponding controls, respectively. However, the ratios between centrally and peripherally performed behavioural activities were higher in the venlafaxine-treated sham rats, indicating an increase in central arena activity as compared to the sham-saline and portacaval-shunted rats. The present study indicates that, despite a 50% dose reduction, caution still is necessary when antidepressants are used in liver insufficient subjects. This study also shows the importance of detailed open-field behavioural studies in which both central and peripheral activities are recorded for measurement of open-field behavioural drug effects. © Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology 2005.

  • 9.
    Kugelberg, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Apelqvist, Gustav
    Carlsson, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Ahlner, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Bengtsson, Finn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Sustained citalopram treatment in experimental hepatic encephalopathy: Effects on entrainment to the light-dark cycle and melatonin2006In: Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology, ISSN 1742-7835, E-ISSN 1742-7843, Vol. 99, no 1, p. 80-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with chronic hepatic encephalopathy often display altered diurnal rhythm as well as other affective disturbances which motivate treatment with antidepressants. We investigated the effects of sustained treatment with citalopram (10 mg/kg daily, 10 days) on 24-hr behavioural open-field activities in portacaval-shunted (PCS) rats and sham-operated control rats. In addition, the daytime and nighttime serum melatonin levels, as well as the serum concentrations of the enantiomers of citalopram and its metabolites, were analyzed. Untreated PCS rats showed reduced locomotor and rearing activities during nighttime. Citalopram treatment resulted in elevated behavioural activity in the PCS rats during night, indicative of an improved entrainment to the light-dark cycle, whereas no behavioural effect could be observed in sham rats. Higher melatonin levels in both PCS and sham rats were observed during nighttime compared with daytime, but the untreated PCS rats also showed higher daytime melatonin level than the corresponding sham group. Citalopram treatment seemed not to have any major effect on the melatonin levels. Higher serum levels of both citalopram and metabolites were observed in PCS rats as compared to sham rats. An altered ratio between the S- and R-enantiomers could also be observed in the PCS rats. In conclusion, the present data support the contention of a disturbed diurnal rhythm, and that the melatonin activity may be altered, in chronic hepatic encephalopathy. The citalopram treatment resulted in similar behavioural performances and daytime serum melatonin levels in PCS rats and controls, although pharmacokinetic differences were present between the groups. © Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology 2006, All rights reserved.

  • 10.
    Suleman Khan, Muhammad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zetterlund, Eva-Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Green, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Oscarsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zackrisson, Anna-Lena
    National Board Forens Med, Department Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Lindholm, Maj-Lis
    Kalmar Hospital, Sweden.
    Persson, Harald
    Kalmar Hospital, Sweden.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Pharmacogenetics, Plasma Concentrations, Clinical Signs and EEG During Propofol Treatment2014In: Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology, ISSN 1742-7835, E-ISSN 1742-7843, Vol. 115, no 6, p. 565-570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A variety of techniques have been developed to monitor the depth of anaesthesia. Propofols pharmacokinetics and response vary greatly, which might be explained by genetic polymorphisms. We investigated the impact of genetic variations on dosage, anaesthetic depth and recovery after total intravenous anaesthesia with propofol. A total of 101 patients were enrolled in the study. The plasma concentration of propofol during anaesthesia was measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. EEG was monitored during the surgical procedure as a measure of anaesthetic depth. Pyrosequencing was used to determine genetic polymorphisms in CYP2B6, CYP2C9, the UGTIA9-promotor and the GABRE gene. The correlation between genotype and to plasma concentration at the time of loss of consciousness (LOC), the total induction dose, the time to anaesthesia, eye opening and clearance were investigated. EEG monitoring showed that the majority of the patients had not reached a sufficient level of anaesthetic depth (subdelta) at the time of loss of consciousness despite a high induction dose of propofol. Patients with UGT1A9-331C/T had a higher propofol clearance than those without (p=0.03) and required a higher induction dose (p=0.03). The patients with UGT1A9-1818T/C required a longer time to LOC (p=0.03). The patients with CYP2C9*2 had a higher concentration of propofol at the time of LOC (p=0.02). The polymorphisms in the metabolizing enzymes and the receptor could not explain the large variation seen in the pharmacokinetics of propofol and the clinical response seen. At LOC, the patients showed a large difference in EEG pattern.

  • 11.
    Trulsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Svanvik, Joar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Cholecystokinin-8-induced hypoplasia of the rat pancreas: Influence of nitric oxide on cell proliferation and programmed cell death2004In: Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology, ISSN 1742-7835, E-ISSN 1742-7843, Vol. 95, no 4, p. 183-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The background of cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8)-induced hypoplasia in the pancreas is not known. In order to increase our understanding we studied the roles of nitric oxide and NF-κB in rats. CCK-8 was injected for 4 days, in a mode known to cause hypoplasia, and the nitric oxide formation was either decreased by means of Nω-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) or increased by S-nitroso-N-acetylpencillamine (SNAP). The activation of NF-κB was quantified by ELISA detection, apoptosis with caspase-3 and histone-associated DNA-fragmentation and mitotic activity in the acinar, centroacinar and ductal cells were visualized by the incorporation of [3H]-thymidine. Pancreatic histology and weight as well as protein- and DNA contents were also studied. Intermittent CCK injections reduced pancreatic weight, protein and DNA contents and increased apoptosis, acinar cell proliferation and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation. It also caused vacuolisation of acinar cells. The inhibition of endogenous nitric oxide formation by L-NNA further increased apoptosis and NF-κB activation but blocked the increased proliferation and vacuolisation of acinar cells. The DNA content was not further reduced. SNAP given together with CCK-8 increased apoptosis and other pathways of cell death, raised proliferation of acinar cells and strongly reduced the DNA content in the pancreas. Histological examination showed no inflammation in any group. We conclude that during CCK-8-induced pancreatic hypoplasia, endogenously formed nitric oxide suppresses apoptosis but increases cell death along non-apoptotic pathways and stimulates regeneration of acinar cells. Exogenous nitric oxide enhances the acinar cell turnover by increasing both apoptotic and non-apoptotic cell death and cell renewal. In this situation NF-κB activation seems not to inhibit apoptosis nor promote cell proliferation.

  • 12.
    Wallerstedt, Susanna M.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wettermark, Björn
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Hoffmann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis.
    The First Decade with the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register - A Systematic Review of the Output in the Scientific Literature2016In: Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology, ISSN 1742-7835, E-ISSN 1742-7843, Vol. 119, no 5, p. 464-469Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to quantify and characterize the scientific output from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register (SPDR) the first decade after its establishment. A systematic literature search was performed in Medline, EMBASE and PubMed (2005-2014). Additional publications were identified by personal knowledge, reference lists, contact with active authors and a citation search in Web of Sciences. Publications using SPDR data were included in the analysis and characterized regarding study type, presence of patient-level record linkage, target population and topic. A total of 719 publications were identified in the literature search and an additional 148 by other strategies. Three hundred and thirty-eight studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The majority were analytic (n = 166; 49.1%) or descriptive (n = 100; 29.5%). The remaining studies focused on validation (n = 20; 5.9%), health economics (n = 16; 4.7%) or miscellaneous (n = 36; 10.7%). The analytic studies investigating effects of drug exposure focused mainly on safety (n = 46) and/or effectiveness (n = 24). The first publications appeared in 2007 (n = 6), and in 2014, 90 articles using SPDR were published. Over the years, linkage with other registers using the personal identity number increased (0-88.9% of the publications). The population was often selected by age (49.7%), condition (45.0%) and/or drug (22.8%) and concerned predominantly psychiatric (29.0%) and cardiovascular (20.4%) diseases. In conclusion, this study illustrates that the establishment of a nationwide individual-based register on dispensed prescription drugs facilitates an encouraging development of pharmacoepidemiological research, both regarding the number of publications and the scientific level of the analyses.

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