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  • 1.
    Adam, Rania Elhadi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics, Electronics and Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chalangar, Ebrahim
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics, Electronics and Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. School of Information Technology, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Pirhashemi, Mahsa
    Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil, Iran.
    Pozina, Galia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Palisaitis, Justinas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pettersson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics, Electronics and Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. School of Information Technology, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden; Solid State Physics and NanoLund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics, Electronics and Mathematics.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics, Electronics and Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Graphene-based plasmonic nanocomposites for highly enhanced solar-driven photocatalytic activities2019In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 9, no 52, p. 30585-30598Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-efficiency photocatalysts are crucial for the removal of organic pollutants and environmental sustainability. In the present work, we report on a new low-temperature hydrothermal chemical method, assisted by ultrasonication, to synthesize disruptive plasmonic ZnO/graphene/Ag/AgI nanocomposites for solar-driven photocatalysis. The plasmonic nanocomposites were investigated by a wide range of characterization techniques, confirming successful formation of photocatalysts with excellent degradation efficiency. Using Congo red as a model dye molecule, our experimental results demonstrated a photocatalytic reactivity exceeding 90% efficiency after one hour simulated solar irradiation. The significantly enhanced degradation efficiency is attributed to improved electronic properties of the nanocomposites by hybridization of the graphene and to the addition of Ag/AgI which generates a strong surface plasmon resonance effect in the metallic silver further improving the photocatalytic activity and stability under solar irradiation. Scavenger experiments suggest that superoxide and hydroxyl radicals are responsible for the photodegradation of Congo red. Our findings are important for the fundamental understanding of the photocatalytic mechanism of ZnO/graphene/Ag/AgI nanocomposites and can lead to further development of novel efficient photocatalyst materials.

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  • 2.
    Aftab, Umair
    et al.
    Mehran Univ Engn and Technol, Pakistan.
    Tahira, Aneela
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics, Electronics and Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mazzaro, Raffaello
    Italian Natl Res Council, Italy.
    Morandi, Vittorio
    Italian Natl Res Council, Italy.
    Abro, Muhammad Ishaq
    Mehran Univ Engn and Technol, Pakistan.
    Baloch, Muhammad Moazam
    Mehran Univ Engn and Technol, Pakistan.
    Yu, Cong
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain
    Univ Sindh, Pakistan.
    Nickel-cobalt bimetallic sulfide NiCo(2)S(4)nanostructures for a robust hydrogen evolution reaction in acidic media2020In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, RSC ADVANCES, Vol. 10, no 37, p. 22196-22203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are many challenges associated with the fabrication of efficient, inexpensive, durable and very stable nonprecious metal catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In this study, we have designed a facile strategy by tailoring the concentration of precursors to successfully obtain nickel-cobalt bimetallic sulfide (NiCo2S4) using a simple hydrothermal method. The morphology of the newly prepared NiCo(2)S(4)comprised a mixture of microparticles and nanorods, which were few microns in dimension. The crystallinity of the composite sample was found to be excellent with a cubic phase. The sample that contained a higher amount of cobalt compared to nickel and produced single-phase NiCo(2)S(4)exhibited considerably improved HER performance. The variation in the salt precursor concentration during the synthesis of a material is a simple methodology to produce a scalable platinum-free catalyst for HER. The advantageous features of the multiple active sites of cobalt in the CN-21 sample as compared to that for pristine CoS and NiS laid the foundation for the provision of abundant active edges for HER. The composite sample produced a current density of 10 mA cm(-2)at an overpotential of 345 mV. Also, it exhibited a Tafel value of 60 mV dec(-1), which predominantly ensured rapid charge transfer kinetics during HER. CN-21 was highly durable and stable for 30 hours. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed that the charge transfer resistance was 21.88 ohms, which further validated the HER polarization curves and Tafel results. CN-21 exhibited a double layer capacitance of 4.69 mu F cm(-2)and a significant electrochemically active surface area of 134.0 cm(2), which again supported the robust efficiency for HER. The obtained results reveal that our developed NiCo(2)S(4)catalyst has a high density of active edges, and it is a non-noble metal catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction. The present findings provide an alternative strategy and an active nonprecious material for the development of energy-related applications.

  • 3.
    Albaqami, Munirah D.
    et al.
    King Saud Univ, Saudi Arabia.
    Medany, Shymaa S.
    Cairo Univ, Egypt.
    Nafady, Ayman
    King Saud Univ, Saudi Arabia.
    Ibupoto, Mazhar Hussain
    Shah Abdul Latif Univ, Pakistan.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics, Electronics and Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tahira, Aneela
    Univ Sindh, Pakistan.
    Aftab, Umair
    Mehran Univ Engn & Technol, Pakistan.
    Vigolo, Brigitte
    Univ Lorraine, France.
    Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain
    Univ Sindh, Pakistan.
    The fast nucleation/growth of Co3O4 nanowires on cotton silk: the facile development of a potentiometric uric acid biosensor2022In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 12, no 29, p. 18321-18332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we have used cotton silk as a source of abundant hydroxyl groups for the fast nucleation/growth of cobalt oxide (Co3O4) nanowires via a hydrothermal method. The crystal planes of the Co3O4 nanowires well matched the cubic phase. The as-synthesized Co3O4 nanowires mainly contained cobalt and oxygen elements and were found to be highly sensitive towards uric acid in 0.01 M phosphate buffer solution at pH 7.4. Importantly, the Co3O4 nanowires exhibited a large surface area, which was heavily utilized during the immobilization of the enzyme uricase via a physical adsorption method. The potentiometric response of the uricase-immobilizing Co3O4 nanowires was measured in the presence of uric acid (UA) against a silver/silver chloride (Ag/AgCl) reference electrode. The newly fabricated uric acid biosensor possessed a low limit of detection of 1.0 +/- 0.2 nM with a wide linear range of 5 nM to 10 mM and sensitivity of 30.6 mV dec(-1). Additionally, several related parameters of the developed uric acid biosensor were investigated, such as the repeatability, reproducibility, storage stability, selectivity, and dynamic response time, and these were found to be satisfactory. The good performance of the Co3O4 nanowires was verified based on the fast charge-transfer kinetics, as confirmed via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The successful practical use of the uric acid biosensor was demonstrated based on the recovery method. The observed performance of the uricase-immobilizing Co3O4 nanowires revealed that they could be considered as a promising and alternative tool for the detection of uric acid under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. Also, the use of cotton silk as a source of abundant hydroxyl groups may be considered for the remarkably fast nucleation/growth of other metal-oxide nanostructures, thereby facilitating the fabrication of functional electrochemical devices, such as batteries, water-splitting devices, and supercapacitors.

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  • 4.
    Ali, Hala R.
    et al.
    Agr Res Ctr ARC, Egypt.
    Selim, Salah A.
    Cairo Univ, Egypt.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Effects of macrophage polarization on gold nanoparticle-assisted plasmonic photothermal therapy2021In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 11, no 40, p. 25047-25056Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAM) are key pathogenic factors in neoplastic diseases. They are known to have plasticity and can polarize into two opposing phenotypes, including the tumoricidal M1 and the protumoral M2 phenotypes with high prevalence of M2-phentoypes in patients with poor prognosis. Strategies for targeting M2-TAM may consequently increase the efficacy of therapeutic strategies for cancer treatment. Gold nanorod-assisted plasmonic photothermal therapy (PPTT) has emerged as a promising treatment for cancer but the effects of macrophage polarization parameters in the performance of this new treatment modality is still unknown. Herein, human monocytic THP-1 cells were polarized into two opposite phenotypic macrophages (M1-TAM and M2-TAM) and their response to PPTT was examined. M2-TAM exhibits a three-fold increase in AuNP uptake compared to M1-TAM. Laser irradiation results in selective killing of pro-tumoral M2-TAM after treatment with AuNPs with limited effects on anti-tumoral M1-TAM. A positive correlation between the expression of CD206 marker and the AuNP uptake may indicate the role of CD206 in facilitating AuNP uptake. Our findings also suggest that the differences in AuNP avidity and uptake between the M1-TAM and M2-TAM phenotypes may be the rationale behind the effectiveness of PPTT in the treatment of solid tumors.

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  • 5.
    Ali Soomro, Razium
    et al.
    University of Bristol, England; University of Sindh, Pakistan.
    Richard Hallam, Keith
    University of Bristol, England.
    Hussain Ibupoto, Zafar
    University of Sindh, Pakistan.
    Tahira, Aneela
    University of Sindh, Pakistan.
    Jawaid, Sana
    University of Sindh, Pakistan.
    Tufail Hussain Sherazi, Syed
    University of Sindh, Pakistan.
    Sirajjuddin,
    Univ Sindh, Natl Ctr Excellence Analyt Chem, Jamshoro 76080, Pakistan.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A highly selective and sensitive electrochemical determination of melamine based on succinic acid functionalized copper oxide nanostructures2015In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 5, no 127, p. 105090-105097Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents the development of a highly selective and sensitive electrochemical sensor for the determination of melamine from aqueous environments. The sensor system is based on functionalised marigold-like CuO nanostructures fabricated using a controlled hydrothermal process, where the utilised succinic acid is considered to play a dual role as a functionalising and growth controlling agent (modifier). The fabricated nanostructures exhibit sharp and well-ordered structural features with dimensions (thickness) in the range of 10-50 nm. The sensor system exhibits strong linearity within the concentration range of 0.1 x 10(-9) to 5.6 x 10(-9) M and demonstrates an excellent limit of detection up to 0.1 x 10(-10) M. The extreme selectivity and sensing capability of the developed sensor is attributed to the synergy of selective interaction between succinic acid and melamine moieties, and the high surface area of marigold-like CuO nanostructures. In addition to this, the developed sensor was also utilised for the determination of melamine from real milk samples collected from different regions of Hyderabad, Pakistan. The obtained excellent recoveries proved the feasibility of the sensor for real life applications. The sensor system offers an operative measure for detecting extremely low melamine content with high selectivity in food contents.

  • 6.
    Amin, Sidra
    et al.
    Lulea Univ Technol, Sweden; Shaheed Benazir Bhutto Univ, Pakistan.
    Tahira, Aneela
    Lulea Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Solangi, Amber
    Univ Sindh, Pakistan.
    Beni, Valerio
    Res Inst Sweden, Sweden.
    Morante, J. R.
    Catalonia Inst Energy Res IREC, Spain.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mazzaro, Raffaello
    Lulea Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain
    Lulea Univ Technol, Sweden; Univ Sindh, Pakistan.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Lulea Univ Technol, Sweden.
    A practical non-enzymatic urea sensor based on NiCo2O4 nanoneedles2019In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 9, no 25, p. 14443-14451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a new facile electrochemical sensing platform for determination of urea, based on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with nickel cobalt oxide (NiCo2O4) nanoneedles. These nanoneedles are used for the first time for highly sensitive determination of urea with the lowest detection limit (1 mu M) ever reported for the non-enzymatic approach. The nanoneedles were grown through a simple and low-temperature aqueous chemical method. We characterized the structural and morphological properties of the NiCo2O4 nanoneedles by TEM, SEM, XPS and XRD. The bimetallic nickel cobalt oxide exhibits nanoneedle morphology, which results from the self-assembly of nanoparticles. The NiCo2O4 nanoneedles are exclusively composed of Ni, Co, and O and exhibit a cubic crystalline phase. Cyclic voltammetry was used to study the enhanced electrochemical properties of a NiCo2O4 nanoneedle-modified GCE by overcoming the typical poor conductivity of bare NiO and Co3O4. The GCE-modified electrode is highly sensitive towards urea, with a linear response (R-2 = 0.99) over the concentration range 0.01-5 mM and with a detection limit of 1.0 mu M. The proposed non-enzymatic urea sensor is highly selective even in the presence of common interferents such as glucose, uric acid, and ascorbic acid. This new urea sensor has good viability for urea analysis in urine samples and can represent a significant advancement in the field, owing to the simple and cost-effective fabrication of electrodes, which can be used as a promising analytical tool for urea estimation.

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  • 7.
    Arain, Munazza
    et al.
    University of Sindh, Pakistan.
    Nafady, Ayman
    King Saud University, Saudi Arabia; Sohag University, Egypt.
    Sirajuddin,
    Univ Sindh, Pakistan.
    Ibupoto, ZH
    Univ Sindh, Pakistan.
    Sherazi, Syed Tufail Hussain
    University of Sindh, Pakistan.
    Shaikh, Tayyaba
    University of Sindh, Pakistan.
    Khan, Hamayun
    Islamia Coll University, Pakistan.
    Alsalme, Ali
    King Saud University, Saudi Arabia.
    Niaz, Abdul
    Bannu University of Science and Technology, Pakistan.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simpler and highly sensitive enzyme-free sensing of urea via NiO nanostructures modified electrode2016In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 6, no 45, p. 39001-39006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, NiO nanostructures were synthesized via a hydrothermal process using ascorbic acid as doping agent in the presence of ammonia. As prepared nanostructures were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface area analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). These analyses showed that these nanostructures are in the form of cotton-like porous material and crystalline in nature. Furthermore, the average size of these NiO crystallites was estimated to be 3.8 nm. These nanostructures were investigated for their potential to be a highly sensitive and selective enzyme-free sensor for detection of urea after immobilizing on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) using 0.1% Nafion as binder. The response of this as developed amperometric sensor was linear in the range of 100-1100 mu M urea with a R-2 value of 0.990 and limit of detection (LOD) of 10 mu M. The sensor responded negligibly to various interfering species including glucose, uric acid, and ascorbic acid. This sensor was applied successfully for determining urea in real water samples such as mineral water, tap water, and river water with acceptable recovery.

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  • 8.
    Bai, Sai
    et al.
    Zhejiang University, Peoples R China.
    He, Shasha
    Zhejiang University, Peoples R China.
    Jin, Yizheng
    Zhejiang University, Peoples R China.
    Wu, Zhongwei
    Soochow University, Peoples R China.
    Xia, Zhouhui
    Soochow University, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Baoquan
    Soochow University, Peoples R China.
    Wang, Xin
    Zhejiang University, Peoples R China.
    Ye, Zhizhen
    Zhejiang University, Peoples R China.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Shao, Shuyan
    Zhang, Fengling
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Electrophoretic deposited oxide thin films as charge transporting interlayers for solution-processed optoelectronic devices: the case of ZnO nanocrystals2015In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 5, no 11, p. 8216-8222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A promising fabrication method of electron transporting interlayers for solution-processed optoelectronic devices by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of colloidal zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals was demonstrated. A low voltage of 3-5 V and a short deposition time of 40 s at room temperature were found to be sufficient to generate dense and uniform ZnO thin films. The EPD ZnO nanocrystal films were applied as ETLs for inverted organic solar cell and polymer light emitting diodes (PLEDs). By optimizing the EPD processing of ZnO nanocrystal electron transporting layers (ETLs), inverted organic solar cells based on [3,4-b]-thiophene/benzodithiophene (PTB7): [6-6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT): [6-6]-phenyl-C-61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) with an average PCE of 8.4% and 4.0% were fabricated. In combination with the PLEDs and flexible devices results, we conclude that the EPD processed ZnOnanocrystal thin films can serve as high quality ETLs for solution-processed optoelectronic devices.

  • 9.
    Bhatti, Adeel Liaquat
    et al.
    Univ Sindh, Pakistan.
    Aftab, Umair
    Mehran Univ Engn and Technol, Pakistan.
    Tahira, Aneela
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics, Electronics and Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Abro, Muhammad Ishaq
    Mehran Univ Engn and Technol, Pakistan.
    Samoon, Muhammad Kashif
    Ctr Pure and Appl Geol Univ Sindh, Pakistan.
    Aghem, Muhammad Hassan
    Ctr Pure and Appl Geol Univ Sindh, Pakistan.
    Bhatti, Muhamad Ali
    Ctr Environm Sci, Pakistan.
    HussainIbupoto, Zafar
    Univ Sindh, Pakistan.
    Facile doping of nickel into Co3O4 nanostructures to make them efficient for catalyzing the oxygen evolution reaction2020In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, RSC ADVANCES, Vol. 10, no 22, p. 12962-12969Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing a facile and low-cost methodology to fabricate earth-abundant catalysts is very much needed for a wide range of applications. Herein, a simple and straightforward approach was developed to tune the electronic properties of cobalt oxide nanostructures by doping them with nickel and then using them to catalyze the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in an aqueous solution of 1.0 M KOH. The addition of a nickel impurity improved the conductivity of the cobalt oxide, and further increased its activity towards the OER. Analytical techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to investigate, respectively, the morphology, composition and crystalline structure of the materials used. The nickel-doped cobalt oxide material showed randomly oriented nanowires and a high density of nanoparticles, exhibited the cubic phase, and contained cobalt, nickel and oxygen as its main elements. The nickel-doped cobalt oxide also yielded a Tafel slope of 82 mV dec(-1) and required an overpotential of 300 mV to reach a current density of 10 mA cm(-2). As an OER catalyst, it was shown to be durable for 40 h. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis showed a low charge-transfer resistance of 177.5 ohms for the nickel-doped cobalt oxide, which provided a further example of its excellent OER performance. These results taken together indicated that nickel doping of cobalt oxide can be accomplished via a facile approach and that the product of this doping can be used for energy and environmental applications.

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  • 10.
    Björk, Emma
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Ulm, Germany.
    Baumann, Bernhard
    Univ Ulm, Germany.
    Hausladen, Florian
    Ulm Univ, Germany.
    Wittig, Rainer
    Ulm Univ, Germany.
    Linden, Mika
    Univ Ulm, Germany.
    Cell adherence and drug delivery from particle based mesoporous silica films2019In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 9, no 31, p. 17745-17753Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spatially and temporally controlled drug delivery is important for implant and tissue engineering applications, as the efficacy and bioavailability of the drug can be enhanced, and can also allow for drugging stem cells at different stages of development. Long-term drug delivery over weeks to months is however difficult to achieve, and coating of 3D surfaces or creating patterned surfaces is a challenge using coating techniques like spin- and dip-coating. In this study, mesoporous films consisting of SBA-15 particles grown onto silicon wafers using wet processing were evaluated as a scaffold for drug delivery. Films with various particle sizes (100-900 nm) and hence thicknesses were grown onto trichloro(octadecyl)silane-functionalized silicon wafers using a direct growth method. Precise patterning of the areas for film growth could be obtained by local removal of the OTS functionalization through laser ablation. The films were incubated with the drug model 3,3 -dioctadecyloxacarbocyanine perchlorate (DiO), and murine myoblast cells (C2C12 cells) were seeded onto films with different particle sizes. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used to study the cell growth, and a vinculin-mediated adherence of C2C12 cells on all films was verified. The successful loading of DiO into the films was confirmed by UV-vis and CLSM. It was observed that the drugs did not desorb from the particles during 24 hours in cell culture. During adherent growth on the films for 4 h, small amounts of DiO and separate particles were observed inside single cells. After 24 h, a larger number of particles and a strong DiO signal were recorded in the cells, indicating a particle mediated drug uptake. The vast majority of the DiO-loaded particles remained attached to the substrate also after 24 h of incubation, making the films attractive as longer-term reservoirs for drugs on e.g. medical implants.

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  • 11.
    Ekström, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Le Febvrier, Arnaud
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bourgeois, F.
    Univ Technol Blois, France.
    Lundqvist, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Palisaitis, Justinas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Persson, Per O A
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Caballero-Calero, O.
    CEI UAM, Spain.
    Martin-Gonzalez, M. S.
    CEI UAM, Spain.
    Klarbring, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simak, Sergey
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Paul, Biplab
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The effects of microstructure, Nb content and secondary Ruddlesden-Popper phase on thermoelectric properties in perovskite CaMn1-xNbxO3 (x=0-0.10) thin films2020In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, RSC ADVANCES, Vol. 10, no 13, p. 7918-7926Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CaMn1-xNbxO3 (x = 0, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7 and 0.10) thin films have been grown by a two-step sputtering/annealing method. First, rock-salt-structured (Ca,Mn1-x,Nb-x)O thin films were deposited on 11 & x304;00 sapphire using reactive RF magnetron co-sputtering from elemental targets of Ca, Mn and Nb. The CaMn1-xNbxO3 films were then obtained by thermally induced phase transformation from rock-salt-structured (Ca,Mn1-xNbx)O to orthorhombic during post-deposition annealing at 700 degrees C for 3 h in oxygen flow. The X-ray diffraction patterns of pure CaMnO3 showed mixed orientation, while Nb-containing films were epitaxially grown in [101] out of-plane-direction. Scanning transmission electron microscopy showed a Ruddlesden-Popper (R-P) secondary phase in the films, which results in reduction of the electrical and thermal conductivity of CaMn1-xNbxO3. The electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient of the pure CaMnO3 film were measured to 2.7 omega cm and -270 mu V K-1 at room temperature, respectively. The electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient were reduced by alloying with Nb and was measured to 0.09 omega cm and -145 mu V K-1 for x = 0.05. Yielding a power factor of 21.5 mu W K-2 m(-1) near room temperature, nearly eight times higher than for pure CaMnO3 (2.8 mu W K-2 m(-1)). The power factors for alloyed samples are low compared to other studies on phase-pure material. This is due to high electrical resistivity originating from the secondary R-P phase. The thermal conductivity of the CaMn1-xNbxO3 films is low for all samples and is the lowest for x = 0.07 and 0.10, determined to 1.6 W m(-1) K-1. The low thermal conductivity is attributed to grain boundary scattering and the secondary R-P phase.

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  • 12.
    Elhadi Adam, Rania
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pirhashemi, Mahsa
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil, Iran.
    Elhag, Sami
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Habibi-Yangjeh, Aziz
    University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil, Iran.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    ZnO/Ag/Ag2WO4 photo-electrodes with plasmonic behavior for enhanced photoelectrochemical water oxidation2019In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 9, no 15, p. 8271-8279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ag-based compounds are excellent co-catalyst that can enhance harvesting visible light and increase photo-generated charge carrier separation owing to its surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect in photoelectrochemical (PEC) applications. However, the PEC performance of a ZnO/Ag/Ag2WO4 heterostructure with SPR behavior has not been fully studied so far. Here we report the preparation of a ZnO/Ag/Ag2WO4 photo-electrode with SPR behavior by a low temperature hydrothermal chemical growth method followed by a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The properties of the prepared samples were investigated by different characterization techniques, which confirm that Ag/Ag2WO4 was deposited on the ZnO NRs. The Ag2WO4/Ag/ZnO photo-electrode showed an enhancement in PEC performance compared to bare ZnO NRs. The observed enhancement is attributed to the red shift of the optical absorption spectrum of the Ag2WO4/Ag/ZnO to the visible region (>400 nm) and to the SPR effect of surface metallic silver (Ag0) particles from the Ag/Ag2WO4 that could generate electron–hole pairs under illumination of low energy visible sun light. Finally, we proposed the PEC mechanism of the Ag2WO4/Ag/ZnO photo-electrode with an energy band structure and possible electron–hole separation and transportation in the ZnO/Ag/Ag2WO4 heterostructure with SPR effect for water oxidation. ER

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  • 13.
    Fang, Changfeng
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Oruganti, Baswanth
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Durbeej, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Computational study of the working mechanism and rate acceleration of overcrowded alkene-based light-driven rotary molecular motors2014In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 4, no 20, p. 10240-10251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, much progress has been made in the design, synthesis and operation of light-driven rotary molecular motors based on chiral overcrowded alkenes. Through consecutive cistrans photoisomerization and thermal helix inversion steps, where the latter dictate the overall rate of rotation, these motors achieve a full 360° unidirectional rotation around the carbon–carbon double bond connecting the two (rotator and stator) alkene halves. In this work, we report quantum chemical calculations indicating that a particularly fast-rotating overcrowded alkene-based motor capable of reaching the MHz regime, can be made to rotate even faster by the substitution of a rotator methyl group with a methoxy group. Specifically, using density functional theory methods that reproduce the rate-limiting 35 kJ mol−1 thermal free-energy barriers shown by the methyl-bearing motor with errors of 5 kJ mol−1 only, it is predicted that this substitution reduces these barriers by a significant 15–20 kJ mol−1. This prediction is preceded by a series of benchmark calculations for assessing how well density functional theory methods account for available experimental data (crystallographic, UV-vis absorption, thermodynamic) on the rotary cycles of overcrowded alkenes, and a detailed examination of the thermal and photochemical reaction mechanisms of the original motor of this type.

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  • 14.
    Girgis, Adel S.
    et al.
    Natl Res Ctr, Egypt.
    D´Arcy, Padraig
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aboshouk, Dalia R.
    Natl Res Ctr, Egypt.
    Bekheit, Mohamed S.
    Natl Res Ctr, Egypt.
    Synthesis and bio-properties of 4-piperidone containing compounds as curcumin mimics2022In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 12, no 48, p. 31102-31123Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The broad spectrum of curcumins beneficial properties has encouraged medicinal researchers to investigate its therapeutic efficacy against diverse diseases. The clinical potential of curcumin is, however limited due to its poor pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic properties (such as low solubility, pH instability, poor absorption in circulation, rapid elimination from the body and photochemical degradation). 3,5-Bis(ylidene)-4-piperidone scaffolds are considered a curcumin mimic that exhibit diverse bio-properties. The current review provides a brief overview of these mimics and highlights biological activities relevant to drug development.

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  • 15.
    Gowda, Vasantha
    et al.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Biler, Michal
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Filippov, Andrei
    Lulea Univ Technol, Sweden; Kazan State Med Univ, Russia.
    Mantonico, Malisa V
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Ornithopoulou, Eirini
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Linares, Mathieu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Antzutkin, Oleg N.
    Lulea Univ Technol, Sweden; Univ Warwick, England.
    Lendel, Christofer
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Structural characterisation of amyloid-like fibrils formed by an amyloidogenic peptide segment of beta-lactoglobulin2021In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 11, no 45, p. 27868-27879Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein nanofibrils (PNFs) represent a promising class of biobased nanomaterials for biomedical and materials science applications. In the design of such materials, a fundamental understanding of the structure-function relationship at both molecular and nanoscale levels is essential. Here we report investigations of the nanoscale morphology and molecular arrangement of amyloid-like PNFs of a synthetic peptide fragment consisting of residues 11-20 of the protein beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG(11-20)), an important model system for PNF materials. Nanoscale fibril morphology was analysed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) that indicates the presence of polymorphic self-assembly of protofilaments. However, observation of a single set of C-13 and N-15 resonances in the solid-state NMR spectra for the beta-LG(11-20) fibrils suggests that the observed polymorphism originates from the assembly of protofilaments at the nanoscale but not from the molecular structure. The secondary structure and inter-residue proximities in the beta-LG(11-20) fibrils were probed using NMR experiments of the peptide with C-13- and N-15-labelled amino acid residues at selected positions. We can conclude that the peptides form parallel beta-sheets, but the NMR data was inconclusive regarding inter-sheet packing. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm the stability of parallel beta-sheets and suggest two preferred modes of packing. Comparison of molecular dynamics models with NMR data and calculated chemical shifts indicates that both packing models are possible.

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  • 16.
    Gusev, Alexey
    et al.
    VI Vernadsky Crimean Fed Univ, Ukraine.
    Kiskin, Mikhail
    Russian Acad Sci, Russia.
    Braga, Elena
    VI Vernadsky Crimean Fed Univ, Ukraine.
    Zamnius, Ekaterina
    VI Vernadsky Crimean Fed Univ, Ukraine.
    Kryukova, Mariya
    St Petersburg State Univ, Russia.
    Karaush-Karmazin, Nataliya
    Bohdan Khmelnytsky Natl Univ, Ukraine.
    Baryshnikov, Glib
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Bohdan Khmelnytsky Natl Univ, Ukraine.
    Minaev, Boris
    Bohdan Khmelnytsky Natl Univ, Ukraine.
    Linert, Wolfgang
    Vienna Univ Technol, Austria.
    Structure and emission properties of dinuclear copper(i) complexes with pyridyltriazole2023In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 3899-3909Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new series of five highly emissive binuclear heteroleptic pyridyltriazole-Cu(i)-phosphine complexes 1-5 was synthesized and examined by different experimental (IR, elemental and thermogravimetric analysis, single crystal X-ray diffraction technique, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy) and quantum chemical aproaches. Complexes 1-5 exhibited excellent stimuli-responsive photoluminescent performance in the solid state at room temperature (quantum yield (QY) = 27.5-52.0%; lifetime (tau) = 8.3-10.7 mu s) and when the temperature was lowered to 77 K (QY = 38.3-88.2; tau = 17.8-134.7 mu s). The highest QY was examined for complex 3 (52%) that can be explained by the small structural changes between the ground S-0 and exited S-1 and T-1 states leading to the small S-1-T-1 triplet gap and efficient thermally-activated delayed fluorescence. Moreover, complex 4 demonstrates reversible mechanochromic and excitation dependent luminescence.

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  • 17.
    Hadi, M. A.
    et al.
    Univ Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Dahlqvist, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Christopoulos, S-R G.
    Coventry Univ, England.
    Naqib, S. H.
    Univ Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Chroneos, A.
    Coventry Univ, England; Imperial Coll, England.
    Islam, A. K. M. A.
    Univ Rajshahi, Bangladesh; Int Islamic Univ, Bangladesh.
    Chemically stable new MAX phase V2SnC: a damage and radiation tolerant TBC material2020In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 10, no 71, p. 43783-43798Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using density functional theory, the phase stability and physical properties, including structural, electronic, mechanical, thermal and vibrational with defect processes, of a newly synthesized 211 MAX phase V2SnC are investigated for the first time. The obtained results are compared with those found in the literature for other existing M2SnC (M = Ti, Zr, Hf, Nb, and Lu) phases. The formation of V2SnC is exothermic and this compound is intrinsically stable in agreement with the experiment. V2SnC has potential to be etched into 2D MXene. The new phase V2SnC and existing phase Nb2SnC are damage tolerant. V2SnC is elastically more anisotropic than Ti2SnC and less than the other M2SnC phases. The electronic band structure and Fermi surface of V2SnC indicate the possibility of occurrence of its superconductivity. V2SnC is expected to be a promising TBC material like Lu2SnC. The radiation tolerance in V2SnC is better than that in Lu2SnC.

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  • 18.
    Halim, Joseph
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Persson, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Persson, Per O A
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sodium hydroxide and vacuum annealing modifications of the surface terminations of a Ti3C2 (MXene) epitaxial thin film2018In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 8, no 64, p. 36785-36790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate, and quantify, changes in structure and surface terminations of epitaxial thin films of titanium carbide (Ti3C2) MXene, when treated by sodium hydroxide solution followed by vacuum annealing at 550 degrees C. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy, we show that NaOH treatment produce an increase in the c-lattice parameter together with an increase in the O terminations and a decrease in the F terminations. There is also an increase in the percentage of the binding energy of Ti-species in Ti 2p XPS region, which suggests an increase in the overall oxidation state of Ti. After subsequent annealing, the c-lattice parameter is slightly reduced, the overall oxidation state of Ti is decreased, and the F surface terminations are further diminished, leaving a surface with predominantly O as the surface terminating species. It is important to note that NaOH treatment facilitates removal of F at lower annealing temperatures than previously reported, which in turn is important for the range of attainable properties.

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  • 19.
    Hanan, Abdul
    et al.
    Harbin Engn Univ, Peoples R China.
    Solangi, Muhammad Yameen
    Mehran Univ Engn & Technol, Pakistan.
    Jaleel Laghari, Abdul
    Mehran Univ Engn & Technol, Pakistan.
    Shah, Aqeel Ahmed
    NED Univ Engn & Technol, Pakistan.
    Aftab, Umair
    Mehran Univ Engn & Technol, Pakistan.
    Ibupoto, Zahoor Ahmed
    PMAS Arid Agr Univ, Pakistan.
    Abro, Muhammad Ishaque
    Mehran Univ Engn & Technol, Pakistan.
    Lakhan, Muhammad Nazim
    Harbin Engn Univ, Peoples R China.
    Soomro, Irfan Ali
    Beijing Univ Chem Technol, Peoples R China.
    Dawi, Elmuez A.
    Ajman Univ, U Arab Emirates.
    Haj Ismail, Abd Al Karim
    Ajman Univ, U Arab Emirates.
    Mustafa, Elfatih Mohammed
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics, Electronics and Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vigolo, Brigitte
    Univ Lorraine, France.
    Tahira, Aneela
    Shah Abdul Latif Univ Khairpur Mirs, Pakistan.
    Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain
    Univ Sindh, Pakistan.
    PdO@CoSe2 composites: efficient electrocatalysts for water oxidation in alkaline media2022In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 743-755Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we have prepared cobalt selenide (CoSe2) due to its useful aspects from a catalysis point of view such as abundant active sites from Se edges, and significant stability in alkaline conditions. CoSe2, however, has yet to prove its functionality, so we doped palladium oxide (PdO) onto CoSe2 nanostructures using ultraviolet (UV) light, resulting in an efficient and stable water oxidation composite. The crystal arrays, morphology, and chemical composition of the surface were studied using a variety of characterization techniques, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. It was also demonstrated that the composite systems were heterogeneous in their morphology, undergoing a shift in their diffraction patterns, suffering from a variety of metal oxidation states and surface defects. The water oxidation was verified by a low overpotential of 260 mV at a current density of 20 mA cm(-2) with a Tafel Slope value of 57 mV dec(-1). The presence of multi metal oxidation states, rich surface edges of Se and favorable charge transport played a leading role towards water oxidation with a low energy demand. Furthermore, 48 h of durability is associated with the composite system. With the use of PdO and CoSe2, new, low efficiency, simple electrocatalysts for water catalysis have been developed, enabling the development of practical energy conversion and storage systems. This is an excellent alternative approach for fostering growth in the field.

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  • 20.
    Hussain Ibupoto, Zafar
    et al.
    University of Sindh, Pakistan.
    Nafady, Aynam
    Sohag University, Egypt; King Saud University, Saudi Arabia.
    Ali Soomro, Razium
    University of Sindh, Pakistan.
    Sirajuddin,
    University of Sindh, Pakistan.
    Tufail Hussain Sherazi, Syed
    University of Sindh, Pakistan.
    Ishaq Abro, Muhammad
    Mehran University of Engn and Technology, Pakistan.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Glycine-assisted synthesis of NiO hollow cage-like nanostructures for sensitive non-enzymatic glucose sensing2015In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 5, no 24, p. 18773-18781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, a highly sensitive non-enzymatic glucose sensor was developed based on NiO hollow cage-like nanostructures (NiO HCs). The novel nanostructures were synthesized using hydrothermal growth route with glycine employed as an effecient growth director. The synthesized NiO HCs were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS) X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) techniques for morphological, compositional and structural determination respectively. The prepared NiO HCs were directly integrated to be structured electrodes exhibiting enhanced electrocatalytic performance toward the oxidation of glucose with high sensitivity (2476.4 mu A mM(-1) cm(-2)), low detection limit (LOD) (0.1 mu M), wide detection range (0.1-5.0 mM) (r(2) = 0.9997) and excellent reproducibility. The developed nonenzymatic glucose sensor further demonstrated excellent anti-interference property in the presence of common interferents such as uric acid (UA), dopamine (DP) and ascorbic acid (AS). The role of glycine molecules as an efficient growth directing agent with a plausible growth mechanism has also been highlighted. In addition, the NiO HCs modified electrode was also used to analyze glucose concentration in human serum samples. The excellent sensing performance can be attributed to the unique morphology, which allowed increased electron transfer passages with lower charge transfer resistance, and enhanced molecular approach during electrochemical sensing offered from nanoscale "hollow cage" units of NiO structures.

  • 21.
    Irshad, Muneeb
    et al.
    Univ Engn & Technol, Pakistan.
    Khalid, Mehak
    Univ Engn & Technol, Pakistan.
    Rafique, Muhammad
    Univ Sahiwal, Pakistan.
    Ahmad, Naveed
    Univ Educ, Pakistan.
    Siraj, Khurram
    Univ Engn & Technol, Pakistan.
    Raza, Rizwan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. COMSATS Univ Islamabad, Pakistan.
    Sadiq, Muhammad
    Univ Engn & Technol, Pakistan.
    Ahsan, Muhammad
    Huazhong Univ Sci & Technol, Peoples R China.
    Ghaffar, Abdul
    Govt Coll Univ, Pakistan.
    Ashfaq, Amina
    Univ Engn & Technol, Pakistan.
    Evaluation of BaCo0.Fe-4(0).4Zr0.2-xNixO3-delta perovskite cathode using nickel as a sintering aid for IT-SOFC2021In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 11, no 24, p. 14475-14483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this research work, BaCo0.Fe-4(0).4Zr0.2-xNixO3-delta (x = 0, 0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04) perovskite cathode material for IT-SOFC is synthesized successfully using a combustion method and sintered at low temperature. The effects of nickel as a sintering aid on the properties of BaCo0.Fe-4(0).Zr-4(0).O-2(3-delta) are investigated through different characterization methods. The addition of nickel increased the densification and grain growth at a lower sintering temperature 1200 degrees C. XRD analysis confirms a single phase of BaCo0.Fe-4(0).Zr-4(0).O-2(3-delta), and an increase in crystalline size is observed. SEM micrographs show formation of dense microstructure with increased nickel concentration. TGA analysis revealed that BaCo0.Fe-4(0).4Zr0.2-xNix cathode materials are thermally stable within the SOFC temperature range, and negligible weight loss of 2.3% is observed. The bonds of hydroxyl groups and metal oxides are confirmed for all samples through FTIR analysis. The highest electrical properties are observed for BaCo0.Fe-4(0).4Zr0.2-xNix (x = 0.04) due to increased densification and electronic defects compared to other compositions. The maximum power density of 0.47 W cm(-2) is obtained for a cell having cathode material BaCo0.Fe-4(0).4Zr0.2-xNix (x = 0.02) owing to its permeable and well-connected structure compared to others.

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  • 22.
    Islam, Mohammad Mirazul
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Ravichandran, Ranjithkumar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Olsen, D.
    FibroGen Inc, CA 94158 USA.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Lee, Chyan-Jang
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Phopase, Jaywant
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Self-assembled collagen-like-peptide implants as alternatives to human donor corneal transplantation2016In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 6, no 61, p. 55745-55749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extracellular matrix proteins like collagen promote regeneration as implants in clinical studies. However, collagens are large and unwieldy proteins, making small functional peptide analogs potentially ideal substitutes. Self-assembling collagen-like-peptides conjugated with PEG-maleimide were assembled into hydrogels. When tested pre-clinically as corneal implants in mini-pigs, they promoted cell and nerve regeneration, forming neo-corneas structurally and functionally similar to natural corneas.

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  • 23.
    Jagdale, Pallavi B.
    et al.
    Jain Deemed Univ, India.
    Manippady, Sai Rashmi
    Jain Deemed Univ, India; Univ Warsaw, Poland.
    Anand, Rohit
    Ulsan Natl Inst Sci & Technol UNIST, South Korea.
    Lee, Geunsik
    Ulsan Natl Inst Sci & Technol UNIST, South Korea.
    Samal, Akshaya Kumar
    Jain Deemed Univ, India.
    Khan, Ziyauddin
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Saxena, Manav
    Jain Deemed Univ, India.
    Agri-waste derived electroactive carbon-iron oxide nanocomposite for oxygen reduction reaction: an experimental and theoretical study2024In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 14, no 17, p. 12171-12178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein, we have utilized agri-waste and amalgamating low Fe3+, to develop an economic iron oxide-carbon hybrid-based electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with water as a main product following close to 4e- transfer process. The electrocatalytic activity is justified by electrochemical active surface area, synergetic effect, and density functional theory calculations. Herein, we have utilized agri-waste and amalgamating low Fe3+, to develop an economic iron oxide-carbon hybrid-based electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with water as a main product following close to 4e- transfer process.

  • 24.
    Ji, Guomin
    et al.
    Shandong University, Peoples R China .
    Cui, Bin
    Shandong University, Peoples R China .
    Xu, Yuqing
    Shandong University, Peoples R China .
    Fang, Changfeng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zhao, Wenkai
    Shandong University, Peoples R China .
    Li, Dongmei
    Shandong University, Peoples R China .
    Liu, Desheng
    Shandong University, Peoples R China Jining University, Peoples R China .
    Enhanced rectifying performance by asymmetrical gate voltage for BDC20 molecular devices2014In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 4, no 32, p. 16537-16544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By applying the asymmetrical gate voltage on the 1,4-bis (fullero[c]pyrrolidin-1-yl) benzene BDC20 molecule, we investigate theoretically its electronic transport properties using the density functional theory and nonequilibrium Greens function formalism for a unimolecule device with metal electrodes. Interestingly, the rectifying characteristic with very high rectification ratio, 91.7 and 24.0, can be obtained when the gate voltage is asymmetrically applied on the BDC20 molecular device. The rectification direction can be tuned by the different gate voltage applying regions. The rectification behavior is understood in terms of the evolution of the transmission spectrum and projected density of states spectrum with applied bias combined with molecular projected self-consistent Hamiltonian states analyses. Our finding implies that to realize and greatly promote rectifying performance of the BDC20 molecule the variable gate voltage applying position might be a key

  • 25.
    Karimian, Najmeh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran.
    Hossein Arbab Zavar, Mohammad
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran.
    Chamsaz, Mahmoud
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran.
    Ashraf, Narges
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Tekidag AB, UCS, Linköping, Sweden.
    A potential-gated molecularly imprinted smart electrode for nicotinamide analysis2015In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 5, no 44, p. 35089-35096Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Triggered surface responsiveness paves the way for smart sensor technologies that not only have tunable retention, but also provide sensing through a built-in programming of electrode material. In this study, we report a potential-gated electrochemical sensor for determination of nicotinamide (NAM) based on a molecularly imprinted overoxidised polypyrrole electrode. The sensitive layer was prepared by electropolymerisation of pyrrole on a glassy carbon electrode in the presence of NAM as a template molecule, followed by alkali extraction. Electrochemical methods were used to monitor the processes of electropolymerisation, template removal and binding in the presence of a [Fe(CN)(6)](3-)/[Fe(CN)(6)](4-) redox couple as an electrochemical probe. Several factors affecting the performance of the MIP-modified electrode were investigated and optimized. The peak current of the ferro/ferricyanide couple decreased linearly with successive addition of NAM in the concentration range 0.9 x 10(-6) to 9.9 x 10(-3) M with a detection limit of 1.7 x 10(-7) M (S/N = 3). The molecularly-imprinted polymer (MIP) electrode had excellent recognition capability for NAM compared to structurally related molecules. Moreover, the reproducibility and repeatability of the NAM-imprinted electrode were all found to be satisfactory. The results from sample analysis confirmed the applicability of the NAM-imprinted electrode to reusable quantitative analysis in commercial pharmaceutical samples.

  • 26.
    Kei Lai, Kwok
    et al.
    Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Peoples R China .
    Renneberg, Reinhard
    Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Peoples R China .
    Cheung Mak, Wing
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bioinspired protein microparticles fabrication by peptide mediated disulfide interchange2014In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 4, no 23, p. 11802-11810Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we report an innovative green chemistry approach for the fabrication of protein microparticles based on peptide mediated disulfide interchange reactions. The concept is based on using a redox reactive peptide, glutathione, as a natural crosslink reagent triggering the formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds between adjacent protein molecules leading to the assembly of protein molecules within a CaCO3 template into a microparticle structure. The CaCO3 template is highly biocompatible and is completely removed by simply adjusting the solution to pH 5.0, leaving behind the pure protein microparticles. Moreover, the GSH is only involved in the intermediate step without being incorporated into the resulting protein microparticles, therefore producing protein microparticles composed of purely protein molecules. This technology provides a simple and robust method to fabricate protein microparticles under physiological aqueous conditions, and more importantly avoiding the extensive use of synthetic chemical crosslinking reagents. We have further demonstrated that this method is versatile to fabricate microparticles with various proteins such as BSA, enzymes and antibodies. The biological functions such as catalytic properties and affinity interactions of the resulting protein microparticles are highly conserved which demonstrate the potential applications of the protein microparticles in the area of biocatalysis, bioseparation and targeted drug delivery.

  • 27.
    Lendel, Christofer
    et al.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Protein nanofibrils and their use as building blocks of sustainable materials2021In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 11, no 62, p. 39188-39215Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development towards a sustainable society requires a radical change of many of the materials we currently use. Besides the replacement of plastics, derived from petrochemical sources, with renewable alternatives, we will also need functional materials for applications in areas ranging from green energy and environmental remediation to smart foods. Proteins could, with their intriguing ability of self-assembly into various forms, play important roles in all these fields. To achieve that, the code for how to assemble hierarchically ordered structures similar to the protein materials found in nature must be cracked. During the last decade it has been demonstrated that amyloid-like protein nanofibrils (PNFs) could be a steppingstone for this task. PNFs are formed by self-assembly in water from a range of proteins, including plant resources and industrial side streams. The nanofibrils display distinct functional features and can be further assembled into larger structures. PNFs thus provide a framework for creating ordered, functional structures from the atomic level up to the macroscale. This review address how industrial scale protein resources could be transformed into PNFs and further assembled into materials with specific mechanical and functional properties. We describe what is required from a protein to form PNFs and how the structural properties at different length scales determine the material properties. We also discuss potential chemical routes to modify the properties of the fibrils and to assemble them into macroscopic structures.

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  • 28.
    Liu, Lianlian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Scalable lignin/graphite electrodes formed by mechanochemistry2019In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, RSC ADVANCES, Vol. 9, no 68, p. 39758-39767Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignin is a promising candidate for energy storage because of its abundance, wide geographic distribution, and low cost as it is mainly available as a low value product from processing of wood into paper pulp. Lignin contains large amounts of potential quinone groups, which can be oxidized and reduced in a two electron process. This redox reaction makes lignin suitable for charge storage. However, lignin is insulating and therefore conductive materials are necessary in lignin electrodes, for whom the cost of the conductive materials hinders the scalable application. Among the organic conductive materials, graphite is one of the cheapest and is easily acquired from nature. In this work, we combine graphite and lignosulfonate (LS) and fabricate LS/graphite organic electrodes under a solvent-free mechanical milling method, without additives. The graphite is sheared into small particles with a size range from 50 nm to 2000 nm. Few-layer graphene is formed during the ball milling process. The LS/graphite hybrid material electrodes with primary stoichiometry of 4/1 (w/w) gives a conductivity of 280 S m(-1) and discharge capacity of 35 mA h g(-1). It is a promising material for the scalable production of LS organic electrodes.

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  • 29.
    Melling, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wilson, S. A.
    University of Dundee, Scotland.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Controlling the electro-mechanical performance of polypyrrole through 3- and 3,4-methyl substituted copolymers2015In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 5, no 102, p. 84153-84163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conducting polymers such as polypyrrole are biocompatible materials used in bioelectronic applications and microactuators for mechanobiology and soft microrobotics. The materials are commonly electrochemically synthesised from an electrolyte solution comprising pyrrole monomers and a salt, which is incorporated as the counter ion. This electrosynthesis results in polypyrrole forming a three-dimensional network with extensive cross-linking in both the alpha and beta positions, which impacts the electro-mechanical performance. In this study we adopt a blocking strategy to restrict and control cross-linking and chain branching through beta substitution of the monomer to investigate the effect of crosslinking on the electroactive properties. Methyl groups where used as blocking groups to minimise the impact on the pyrrole ring system. Pyrrole, 3- and 3,4-methyl substituted pyrrole monomers were electro-polymerised both as homo-polymers and as a series of co-polymer films. The electroactive performance of the films was characterised by measuring their electrochemical responses and their reversible and non-reversible film thickness changes. This showed that altering the degree of crosslinking through this blocking strategy had a large impact on the reversible and irreversible volume change. These results elaborate the importance of the polymer structure in the actuator performance, an aspect that has hitherto received little attention.

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  • 30.
    Mugheri, Abdul Qayoom
    et al.
    Univ Sindh Jamshoro, Pakistan.
    Tahira, Aneela
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Aftab, Umair
    Mehran Univ Engn and Technol, Pakistan.
    Abro, Muhammad Ishaq
    Mehran Univ Engn and Technol, Pakistan.
    Chaudhry, Saleem Raza
    Univ Engn and Technol, Pakistan.
    Amaral, Luis
    Univ Engn and Technol, Pakistan; Univ Lisbon, Portugal.
    Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain
    Univ Sindh Jamshoro, Pakistan.
    Facile efficient earth abundant NiO/C composite electrocatalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c8ra10472g2019In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 9, no 10, p. 5701-5710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the increasing energy consumption, designing efficient electrocatalysts for electrochemical water splitting is highly demanded. In this study, we provide a facile approach for the design and fabrication of efficient and stable electrocatalysts through wet chemical methods. The carbon material, obtained by the dehydration of sucrose sugar, provides high surface area for the deposition of NiO nanostructures and the resulting NiO/C catalysts show higher activity towards the OER in alkaline media. During the OER, a composite of NiO with 200 mg C can produce current densities of 10 and 20 mA cm(-2) at a bias of 1.45 V and 1.47 V vs. RHE, respectively. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy experiments showed the lowest charge transfer resistance and the highest double layer capacitance in the case of the NiO/C composite with 200 mg C. The presence of C for the deposition of NiO nanostructures increases the active centers and consequently a robust electrocatalytic activity is achieved. The obtained results in terms of the low overpotential and small Tafel slope of 55 mV dec(-1) for non-precious catalysts are clear indications for the significant advancement in the field of electrocatalyst design for water splitting. This composite material based on NiO/C is simple and scalable for widespread use in various applications, especially in supercapacitors and lithium-ion batteries.

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  • 31.
    Mugheri, Abdul Qayoom
    et al.
    Univ Sindh Jamshoro, Pakistan.
    Tahira, Aneela
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics, Electronics and Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Aftab, Umair
    Mehran Univ Engn and Technol, Pakistan.
    Abro, Muhammad Ishaq
    Mehran Univ Engn and Technol, Pakistan.
    Mallah, Arfana Begum
    Univ Sindh Jamshoro, Pakistan.
    Memon, Gulam Zuhra
    Univ Sindh Jamshoro, Pakistan.
    Khan, Humaira
    Univ Sindh Jamshoro, Pakistan.
    Abbasi, Mazhar Ali
    Univ Sindh, Pakistan.
    Halepoto, Imran Ali
    Univ Sindh, Pakistan.
    Chaudhry, Saleem Raza
    Univ Engn and Technol, Pakistan.
    Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain
    Univ Sindh Jamshoro, Pakistan.
    An advanced and efficient Co3O4/C nanocomposite for the oxygen evolution reaction in alkaline media2019In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, RSC ADVANCES, Vol. 9, no 59, p. 34136-34143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design of efficient nonprecious catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) or the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is a necessary, but very challenging task to uplift the water-based economy. In this study, we developed a facile approach to produce porous carbon from the dehydration of sucrose and use it for the preparation of nanocomposites with cobalt oxide (Co3O4). The nanocomposites were studied by the powder X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy techniques, and they exhibited the cubic phase of cobalt oxide and porous structure of carbon. The nanocomposites showed significant OER activity in alkaline media, and the current densities of 10 and 20 mA cm(-2) could be obtained at 1.49 and 1.51 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), respectively. The impedance study confirms favorable OER activity on the surface of the prepared nanocomposites. The nanocomposite is cost-effective and can be capitalized in various energy storage technologies.

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  • 32.
    Mustafa, Elfatih Mohammed
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics, Electronics and Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dawi, E. A.
    Ajman Univ, U Arab Emirates.
    Ibupoto, Z. H.
    Univ Sindh, Pakistan.
    Ibrahim, A. M. M.
    Jazan Univ, Saudi Arabia.
    Elsukova, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tahira, A.
    Shah Abdul Latif Univ Khairpur Mirs, Pakistan.
    Elhadi Adam, Rania Elhadi
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics, Electronics and Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics, Electronics and Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics, Electronics and Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Efficient CuO/Ag2WO4 photoelectrodes for photoelectrochemical water splitting using solar visible radiation2023In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 13, no 17, p. 11297-11310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water splitting energy production relies heavily on the development of high-performance photoelectrochemical cells (PECs). Among the most highly regarded semiconductor materials, cupric oxide (CuO) is an excellent photocathode material. Pristine CuO does not perform well as a photocathode due to its tendency to recombine electrons and holes rapidly. Photocathodes with high efficiency can be produced by developing CuO-based composite systems. The aim of our research is to develop an Ag2WO4/CuO composite by incorporating silver tungstate (Ag2WO4) nanoparticles onto hydrothermally grown CuO nanoleaves (NLs) by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR). To prepare CuO/Ag2WO4 composites, SILAR was used in conjunction with different Ag2WO4 nanoparticle deposition cycles. Physicochemical characterization reveals well-defined nanoleaves morphologies with tailored surface compositions. Composite CuO/Ag2WO4 crystal structures are governed by the monoclinic phase of CuO and the hexagonal phase of Ag2WO4. It has been demonstrated that the CuO/Ag2WO4 composite has outstanding performance in the PEC water splitting process when used with five cycles. In the CuO/Ag2WO4 photocathode, water splitting activity is observed at low overpotential and high photocurrent density, indicating that the reaction takes place at low energy barriers. Several factors contribute to PEC performance in composites. These factors include the high density of surface active sites, the high charge separation rate, the presence of favourable surface defects, and the synergy of CuO and Ag2WO4 photoreaction. By using SILAR, silver tungstate can be deposited onto semiconducting materials with strong visible absorption, enabling the development of energy-efficient photocathodes.

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  • 33.
    Musumeci, Chiara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Northwestern University, IL 60208 USA.
    Borgani, Riccardo
    KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Bergqvist, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Haviland, David
    KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Multiparameter investigation of bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaics2017In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 7, no 73, p. 46313-46320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A key parameter to improve the performance of organic solar cells is the optimization of electronic phenomena at donor-acceptor interfaces through the optimization of the morphology of the bulk heterojunction. The correlative mapping of morphological, electrical and mechanical properties at the nanoscale by advanced scanning probe microscopy techniques allows for a detailed characterization of the local structure-property relationships in bulk heterojunctions solar cells. Unique opportunities for the investigation of these photoactive films are shown here, ultimately suggesting fundamental guidelines toward the accurate engineering of these materials at the nanoscale.

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  • 34.
    Nawaz, Saima
    et al.
    Quaid I Azam Univ, Pakistan; Natl Ctr Phys, Pakistan.
    Khan, Yaqoob
    Natl Ctr Phys, Pakistan.
    Abdelmohsen, Shaimaa A. M.
    Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman Univ, Saudi Arabia.
    Khalid, Sadia
    Natl Ctr Phys, Pakistan.
    Björk, Emma
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rasheed, Muhammad Asim
    Pakistan Inst Engn & Appl Sci PIEAS, Pakistan.
    Siddiq, M.
    Quaid I Azam Univ, Pakistan.
    Polyaniline inside the pores of high surface area mesoporous silicon as composite electrode material for supercapacitors2022In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 12, no 27, p. 17228-17236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mesoporous silicon (mSi) obtained by the magnesiothermic reduction of mesoporous silica was used to deposit polyaniline (PANI) in its pores, the composite was tested for its charge storage application for high performance supercapacitor electrodes. The mesoporous silica as confirmed by Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) has a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of 724 m(2)g(-1) and mean pore size of 5 nm. After magnesiothermic reduction to mSi, the BET surface area is reduced to 348 m(2)g(-1) but the mesoporousity is retained with a mean pore size of 10 nm. The BET surface area of mesoporous silicon is among the highest for porous silicon prepared/reduced from silica. In situ polymerization of PANI inside the pores of mSi was achieved by controlling the polymerization conditions. As a supercapacitor electrode, the mSi-PANI composite exhibits better charge storage performance as compared to pure PANI and mesoporous silica-PANI composite electrodes. Enhanced electrochemical performance of the mSi-PANI composite is attributed to the high surface mesoporous morphology of mSi with a network structure containing abundant mesopores enwrapped by an electrochemically permeable polyaniline matrix.

  • 35.
    Pirhashemi, Mahsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Iran.
    Elhag, Sami
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Elhadi Adam, Rania
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Habibi-Yangjeh, Aziz
    University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Iran.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    n–n ZnO–Ag2CrO4 heterojunction photoelectrodes with enhanced visible-light photoelectrochemical properties2019In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 9, no 14, p. 7992-8001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, ZnO nanorods (NRs) were hydrothermally grown on an Au-coated glass substrate at a relatively low temperature (90 °C), followed by the deposition of Ag2CrO4 particles via a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) route. The content of the Ag2CrO4 particles on ZnO NRs was controlled by changing the number of SILAR cycles. The fabricated ZnO–Ag2CrO4 heterojunction photoelectrodes were subjected to morphological, structural, compositional, and optical property analyses; their photoelectrochemical (PEC) properties were investigated under simulated solar light illumination. The photocurrent responses confirmed that the ability of the ZnO–Ag2CrO4 heterojunction photoelectrodes to separate the photo-generated electron–hole pairs is stronger than that of bare ZnO NRs. Impressively, the maximum photocurrent density of about 2.51 mA cm−2 at 1.23 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) was measured for the prepared ZnO–Ag2CrO4 photoelectrode with 8 SILAR cycles (denoted as ZnO–Ag2CrO4-8), which exhibited about 3-fold photo-enhancement in the current density as compared to bare ZnO NRs (0.87 mA cm−2) under similar conditions. The improvement in photoactivity was attributed to the ideal band gap and high absorption coefficient of the Ag2CrO4 particles, which resulted in improved solar light absorption properties. Furthermore, an appropriate annealing treatment was proven to be an efficient process to increase the crystallinity of Ag2CrO4 particles deposited on ZnO NRs, which improved the charge transport characteristics of the ZnO–Ag2CrO4-8 photoelectrode annealed at 200 °C and increased the performance of the photoelectrode. The results achieved in the present work present new insights for designing n–n heterojunction photoelectrodes for efficient and cost-effective PEC applications and solar-to-fuel energ

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  • 36.
    Pirhashemi, Mahsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Mohaghegh Ardabili, Iran.
    Elhag, Sami
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Habibi-Yangjeh, Aziz
    Univ Mohaghegh Ardabili, Iran.
    Pozina, Galia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    RETRACTED: Polyethylene glycol-doped BiZn2VO6 as a high efficiency solar-light-activated photocatalyst with substantial durability toward photodegradation of organic contaminations2018In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 8, no 65, p. 37480-37491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we focus on a simple, low-priced, and mild condition hydrothermal route to construct BiZn2VO6 nanocompounds (NCs) as a novel photocatalyst with strong solar Eight absorption ability for environmental purification using solar energy. NCs were further doped with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to improve their photocatalytic efficiency for photodegradation processes through inhibition of fast charge carrier recombination rates and higher charge separation efficiency. Surface morphology, phase structure, optical characteristics, and band structure of the as-prepared samples were analyzed using XRD, EDX, XPS, SEM, UV-vis spectroscopy, CL, and BET techniques. PEG-doped BiZn2VO6 NCs were applied as effective materials to degrade various kinds of organic pollutants including cationic and anionic types, and these NCs exhibited excellent photocatalytic efficiency as compared to traditional photocatalysts. In particular, the PEG-doped BiZn2VO6 (0.10% w/v) photocatalyst exhibited highly enhanced photocatalytic performance with improvements of about 46.4, 28.3, and 7.23 folds compared with PEG-doped ZnO nanorods (NRs), pristine BiVO4, and BiZn2VO6 samples, respectively, for the decomposition of congo red (CR) dye. After 40 minutes of sunlight irradiation, 97.4% of CR was decomposed. In this study, scavenging experiments indicated that both hydroxyl radicals and holes play dominant roles in CR photodegradation under simulated solar Eight irradiation. Meanwhile, the optimal photocatalyst demonstrated good reproducibility and stability for successive cycles of photocatalysis.

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  • 37.
    Puckert, C.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gelmi, A.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rafat, Mehrdad
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Optimisation of conductive polymer biomaterials for cardiac progenitor cells2016In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 6, no 67, p. 62270-62277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The characterisation of biomaterials for cardiac tissue engineering applications is vital for the development of effective treatments for the repair of cardiac function. New smart materials developed from conductive polymers can provide dynamic benefits in supporting and stimulating stem cells via controlled surface properties, electrical and electromechanical stimulation. In this study we investigate the control of surface properties of conductive polymers through a systematic approach to variable synthesis parameters, and how the resulting surface properties influence the viability of cardiac progenitor cells. A thorough analysis investigating the effect of electropolymerisation parameters, such as current density and growth, and reagent variation on physical properties provides a fundamental understanding of how to optimise conductive polymer biomaterials for cardiac progenitor cells.

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  • 38.
    Rabong, Constantin
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria .
    Schuster, Christoph
    University of Vienna, Austria .
    Liptaj, Tibor
    Slovak University of Technology Bratislava, Slovakia .
    Pronayova, Nadezda
    Slovak University of Technology Bratislava, Slovakia .
    Delchev, Vassil B.
    Paisij Hilendarski University of Plovdiv, Bulgaria .
    Jordis, Ulrich
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria .
    Phopase, Jaywant
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    NXO beta structure mimicry: an ultrashort turn/hairpin mimic that folds in water2014In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 4, no 41, p. 21351-21360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the first application of NXO-pseudopeptides for beta-turn mimicry. Incorporating the proline-derived NProO peptidomimetic building block, a minimal tetrapeptide beta-hairpin mimic has been designed, synthesized and its solution structure elucidated. Emulating a natural proline-glycine beta-turn, evidence from NMR, molecular modeling and CD suggests the formation of two rapidly interconverting hairpin folds in water, methanol and dimethyl-sulfoxide at room temperature, displaying the proline nitrogen amide bond in either cis or trans arrangement. The NProO-modified hairpin features peptidic backbone dihedrals phi, Psi characteristic of natural proline-containing turns composed of alpha-amino acids only. Taken together, the observed folding behavior and inherently high designability render the NProO motif a building block for beta-structure elaboration in aqueous medium.

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  • 39.
    Rahmati, E.
    et al.
    Univ Damghan, Iran.
    Bafekry, A.
    Univ Guilan, Iran; Islamic Azad Univ, Iran.
    Faraji, M.
    TOBB Univ Econ & Technol, Turkey.
    Gogva, D.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nguyen, Chuong V
    Le Quy Don Tech Univ, Vietnam.
    Ghergherehchi, M.
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Thermoelectric properties of doped graphene nanoribbons: density functional theory calculations and electrical transport2022In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 12, no 10, p. 6174-6180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a detailed study on band structure-dependent properties such as electrical conductivity, the charge of carriers and Seebeck coefficients of graphene nano-ribbons (GNRs) doped with the magnetic impurities Fe and Co since the spin thermopower could be considerably enhanced by impurities. Thermoelectric properties of two-dimensional systems are currently of great interest due to the possibility of heat to electrical energy conversion at the nanoscale. The thermoelectric properties are investigated using the semi-classical Boltzmann method. The electronic band structure of doped nano-ribbons is evaluated by means of density-functional theory in which the Hubbard interaction is considered. Different types of nano-ribbons (armchair-edge and zigzag-edge) and their thermoelectric features such as conductivity and Seebeck coefficient in the presence and absence of magnetic impurities have been studied.

  • 40.
    Ravichandran, Ranjithkumar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Åstrand, C.
    KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Patra, Hirak Kumar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chotteau, V.
    KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Phopase, Jaywant
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Intelligent ECM mimetic injectable scaffolds based on functional collagen building blocks for tissue engineering and biomedical applications2017In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 7, no 34, p. 21068-21078Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrogels comprising natural extracellular matrix (ECM) components are very attractive as scaffolds for regenerative medicine applications due to their inherent biointeractive properties. Responsive materials that adapt to their surrounding environments and regulate transport of ions and bioactive molecules manifest significant advantages for biomedical applications. Although there are many exciting challenges, the opportunity to design, fabricate and engineer stimuli-responsive polymeric systems based on ECM components is particularly attractive for regenerative medicine. Here we describe a one-pot approach to fabricate in situ fast gellable intelligent ECM mimetic scaffolds, based on methacrylated collagen building blocks with mechanical properties that can be modulated in the kPa-MPa range and that are suitable for both soft and hard tissues. Physiochemical characterizations demonstrate their temperature and pH responsiveness, together with the structural and enzymatic resistance that make them suitable scaffolds for long-term use in regenerative medicine and biomedical applications. The multifunctionality of these hydrogels has been demonstrated as an in situ depot-forming delivery platform for the adjustable controlled release of proteins and small drug molecules under physiological conditions and as a structural support for adhesion, proliferation and metabolic activities of human cells. The results presented herein should be useful to the design and fabrication of tailor-made scaffolds with tunable properties that retain and exhibit sustained release of growth factors for promoting tissue regeneration.

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  • 41.
    Sadollahkhani, Azar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Shahid Chamran University, Iran.
    Kazeminezhad, Iraj
    Shahid Chamran University, Iran.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Synthesis, structural characterization and photocatalytic application of ZnO@ZnS core-shell nanoparticles2014In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 4, no 70, p. 36940-36950Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized by co-precipitation with no capping agent followed by covering with ZnS using a solution-based chemical method at low temperature. By variation of the solution concentrations it was found that the fully-covering ZnS shell forms by a reaction of Na2S with ZnO NPs followed by the formation of ZnS nano-crystals by the reaction of Na2S with ZnCl2. The mechanism that led to full coverage of the ZnO core is proposed to be the addition of ZnCl2 at a later stage of the growth which guarantees a continuous supply of Zn ions to the core surface. Moreover, the ZnS nanocrystals that uniformly cover the ZnO NPs show no epitaxial relationship between the ZnO core and ZnS shell. The slow atomic mobility at the low reaction temperature is attributed to the non-epitaxial uniform ZnS shell growth. The rough surface of the ZnO grains provides initial nucleation positions for the growth of the ZnS shell nano-crystals. The low growth temperature also inhibits the abnormal growth of ZnS grains and results in the homogeneous coverage of ZnS nano-crystals on the ZnO core surface. The as-synthesized ZnO@ZnS core-shell nanoparticles were used as a photocatalyst to decompose Rose Bengal dye at three different pH values. ZnO@ZnS core-shell nanoparticles perform as a more active photocatalyst at a pH of 4, while pure ZnO nanoparticles are more efficient at a pH of 7.

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  • 42.
    Shtepliuk, Ivan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Substrate mediated properties of gold monolayers on SiC2023In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 1125-1136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In light of their unique physicochemical properties two-dimensional metals are of interest in the development of next-generation sustainable sensing and catalytic applications. Here we showcase results of the investigation of the substrate effect on the formation and the catalytic activity of representative 2D gold layers supported by non-graphenized and graphenized SiC substrates. By performing comprehensive density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we revealed the epitaxial alignment of gold monolayer with the underlying SiC substrate, regardless of the presence of zero-layer graphene or epitaxial graphene. This is explained by a strong binding energy (similar to 4.7 eV) of 2D Au/SiC and a pronounced charge transfer at the interface, which create preconditions for the penetration of the related electric attraction through graphene layers. We then link the changes in catalytic activity of substrate-supported 2D Au layer in hydrogen evolution reaction to the formation of a charge accumulation region above graphenized layers. Gold intercalation beneath zero-layer graphene followed by its transformation to quasi-free-standing epitaxial graphene is found to be an effective approach to tune the interfacial charge transfer and catalytic activity of 2D Au. The sensing potential of substrate-supported 2D Au was also tested through exploring the adsorption behaviour of NH3, NO2 and NO gas molecules. The present results can be helpful for the experimental design of substrate-supported 2D Au layers with targeted catalytic activity and sensing performance.

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  • 43.
    Vavilapalli, Durga Sankar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Materials design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Anna Univ, India.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Materials design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Singh, Shubra
    Anna Univ, India; Anna Univ, India.
    Immobilization of a TiO2-PEDOT:PSS hybrid heterojunction photocatalyst for degradation of organic effluents2023In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 3095-3101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heterojunction photocatalysts have recently emerged for use in degradation of organic pollutants, typically being suspended in effluent solution to degrade it. Post degradation, the catalyst must be removed from the treated solution, which consumes both energy and time. Moreover, the separation of nano catalysts from the treated solution is challenging. In the present work, we explore fabrication of immobilized TiO2-PEDOT:PSS hybrid heterojunction catalysts with the support of a PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) matrix. These photocatalytic films do not require any steps to separate the powdered catalyst from the treated water. While the PVA-based films are unstable in water, their stability could be significantly enhanced by heat treatment, enabling efficient removal of organic effluents like methylene blue (MB) and bisphenol-A (BPA) from the aqueous solution under simulated sunlight irradiation. Over 20 cycles, the heterojunction photocatalyst maintained high photocatalytic activity and showed excellent stability. Hence, an immobilization of the TiO2-PEDOT:PSS hybrid heterojunction is suggested to be beneficial from the viewpoint of reproducible and recyclable materials for simple and efficient wastewater treatment.

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  • 44.
    Wilson, Peter M.
    et al.
    University of Nebraska, USA.
    Zobel, Adam
    University of Nebraska, USA.
    Zaitouna, Anita J.
    University of Nebraska, USA.
    Lipatov, Alexey
    University of Nebraska, USA.
    Schubert, Eva
    University of Nebraska, USA.
    Hofmann, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Nebraska, USA.
    Schubert, Mathias
    University of Nebraska, USA.
    Lai, Rebecca
    University of Nebraska, USA.
    Sinitskii, Alexander
    University of Nebraska, USA; National University of Science and Technology MISIS, Russia.
    Solution-stable anisotropic carbon nanotube/graphene hybrids based on slanted columnar thin films for chemical sensing2016In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 6, no 68, p. 63235-63240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Slanted columnar thin films (SCTFs) are promising anisotropic nano-structures for applications in optical sensing and chemical separation. However, the wide use of SCTFs is significantly limited by their poor mechanical properties and structural stability, especially in liquid media. In this work, we demonstrate the fabrication of solution-stable carbon nanotube (CNT)/graphene hybrid structures based on cobalt SCTFs. The CNT/graphene hybrid structures were synthesized through the use of a titanium underlayer for Co slanted nanopillars as a chemical vapor deposition catalyst, which allows simultaneous growth of CNTs at the Co/Ti interface and three-dimensional graphene over the surface of cobalt. Importantly, the CNT/graphene hybrid structures retain the anisotropy of the parent Co SCTFs and thus remain suitable for optical sensing. Graphene/CNT modification of Co SCTFs not only improves their stability in solutions but also enables their functionalization with pyrene-modified DNA probes, which can be monitored in real time by in situ ellipsometry measurements. In turn, the solution-stable DNA-modified SCTFs may find a wide range of applications in biosensing. The described synthetic approach that allows simultaneous growth of CNTs and graphene by engineering Co/Ti interfaces may also be applied to the fabrication of other kinds of complex CNT/graphene hybrid materials.

  • 45.
    Yeap, W. S.
    et al.
    Hasselt University, Belgium.
    Bevk, D.
    Hasselt University, Belgium; IMOMEC, Diepenbeek, Belgium .
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Krysova, H.
    Academy of Sciences of The Czech Republic, Prague 8, Czech Republic .
    Pasquarelli, A.
    University of Ulm, Germany.
    Vanderzande, D.
    Hasselt University, Belgium; IMOMEC, Diepenbeek, Belgium .
    Lutsen, L.
    Hasselt University, Belgium; IMOMEC, Diepenbeek, Belgium .
    Kavan, L.
    Academy of Sciences of The Czech Republic, Prague 8, Czech Republic .
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Maes, W.
    Hasselt University, Belgium; IMOMEC, Diepenbeek, Belgium .
    Haenen, K.
    Hasselt University, Belgium; IMOMEC, Diepenbeek, Belgium .
    Correction: Diamond functionalization with lighth-arvesting molecular wires: improved surface coverage by optimized Suzuki cross-coupling conditions (vol 4, pg 42044, 2014)2014In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 4, no 92, p. 50678-50678Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 46.
    Yeap, W. S.
    et al.
    Hasselt University, Belgium .
    Bevk, D.
    Hasselt University, Belgium; IMEC vzw, IMOMEC, Diepenbeek, Belgium.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Krysova, H.
    J. Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry, Prague, Czech Republic .
    Pasquarelli, A.
    University of Ulm, Germany.
    Vanderzande, D.
    Hasselt University, Belgium; IMEC vzw, IMOMEC, Diepenbeek, Belgium.
    Lutsen, L.
    Hasselt University, Belgium; IMEC vzw, IMOMEC, Diepenbeek, Belgium.
    Kavan, L.
    J. Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry, Prague, Czech Republic .
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Maes, W.
    Hasselt University, Belgium; IMEC vzw, IMOMEC, Diepenbeek, Belgium.
    Haenen, K.
    Hasselt University, Belgium; IMEC vzw, IMOMEC, Diepenbeek, Belgium.
    Diamond functionalization with light-harvesting molecular wires: improved surface coverage by optimized Suzuki cross-coupling conditions2014In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 4, no 79, p. 42044-42053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Donor-acceptor type light-harvesting molecular wires are covalently attached to a boron-doped diamond surface via a combination of diazonium electrografting and Suzuki cross-coupling. For the Suzuki reaction, various catalytic systems are compared with respect to their imposed surface coverage. Combining 2-dicyclohexylphosphino-2,6-dimethoxybiphenyl (SPhos) and Pd(0), the diamond coverage improves considerably (by 98%) as compared to the standard tetrakis(triphenylphosphine)palladium(0) (Pd(PPh3)(4)) catalyst. As the energy levels between the molecular chromophores and the diamond film align well, the sophisticated functionalized diamond surfaces present a first step towards the development of fully carbon-based devices for light to electricity conversion.

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  • 47.
    Yu, Yichang
    et al.
    Tongji University, Peoples R China.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhang, Yalei
    Tongji University, Peoples R China.
    Gao, Hongwen
    Tongji University, Peoples R China.
    CTAB@BiOCl: a highly adsorptive photocatalyst for eliminating dye contamination2016In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 6, no 22, p. 18577-18582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The title composite was synthesized under facile conditions by hydrolysis and co-precipitation. Through comparative studies, it was found that the morphology, structure and properties were affected by hexadecyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) doping. Although the surface area decreases from 53.5 to 7.5 m(2) g(-1), it was found that CTAB@BiOCl exhibits higher adsorption capacity than the isolated BiOCl, and still maintains good photocatalytic activity, which is a little worse than the isolated BiOCl has. This was caused by the lower content of BiOCl in CTAB@BiOCl, which is less than 70%. The studies show that, in high concentrations of dye-contaminated water, the composite exhibits strong adsorption capacities of 901 mg g(-1) to Congo Red (CR) and 699 mg g(-1) to Reactive Red 3 (X3B). In the low-concentration case, it is able to process photocatalysis of those dyes. In the recycling experiment, the CTAB@BiOCl composite was regenerated in situ. And CTAB in the composite was almost completely degraded after five cycles, resulting in the regenerated BiOCl. Subsequently, the surface area of the composite increases from 7.5 to 22.62 m(2) g(-1), and along with this the adsorption capacities to CR and X3B decrease obviously due to the absence of the CTAB component. In addition, the photocatalysis activity of the generated composite has been promoted to be similar to the isolated BiOCl.

  • 48.
    Yuzu, Keisuke
    et al.
    Ehime Univ, Japan.
    Lindgren, Mikael
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Norway.
    Nyström, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhang, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mori, Wakako
    Ehime Univ, Japan.
    Kunitomi, Risako
    Ehime Univ, Japan.
    Nagase, Terumasa
    Tokyo Med Univ, Japan.
    Iwaya, Keiichi
    Kyoundo Hosp, Japan.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zako, Tamotsu
    Ehime Univ, Japan.
    Insulin amyloid polymorphs: implications for iatrogenic cytotoxicity2020In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 10, no 62, p. 37721-37727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amyloid specific fluorescent probes are becoming an important tool for studies of disease progression and conformational polymorphisms in diseases related to protein misfolding and aggregation such as localized and systemic amyloidosis. Herein, it is demonstrated that using the amyloid specific fluorescent probes pFTAA and benzostyryl capped benzothiadiazole BTD21, structural polymorphisms of insulin amyloids are imaged in localized insulin-derived amyloid aggregates formed at subcutaneous insulin-injection sites in patients with diabetes. It is also found that pFTAA and BTD21 could discriminate structural polymorphisms of insulin amyloids, so called fibrils and filaments, formed in vitro. In addition, it is shown that insulin drug preparations used for treating diabetes formed various types of amyloid aggregates that can be assessed and quantified using pFTAA and BTD21. Interestingly, incubated pFTAA-positive insulin preparation aggregates show cytotoxicity while BTD21-positive aggregates are less toxic. From these observations, a variety of amyloid polymorphic structures with different cytotoxicities formed both in vivo and in vitro by various insulin preparations are proposed.

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