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  • 1.
    Ahsan, Aisha
    et al.
    Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Mousavi, S. Fatemeh
    Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Nijs, Thomas
    Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Nowakowska, Sylwia
    Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Popova, Olha
    Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Wackerlin, Aneliia
    Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Björk, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gade, Lutz H.
    Heidelberg Univ, Germany.
    Jung, Thomas A.
    Univ Basel, Switzerland; Paul Scherrer Inst, Switzerland.
    Watching nanostructure growth: kinetically controlled diffusion and condensation of Xe in a surface metal organic network2019In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 11, no 11, p. 4895-4903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diffusion, nucleation and growth provide the fundamental access to control nanostructure growth. In this study, the temperature activated diffusion of Xe at and between different compartments of an on-surface metal organic coordination network on Cu(111) has been visualized in real space. Xe atoms adsorbed at lower energy sites become mobile with increased temperature and gradually populate energetically more favourable binding sites or remain in a delocalized fluid form confined to diffusion along a topological subset of the on-surface network. These diffusion pathways can be studied individually under kinetic control via the chosen thermal energy kT of the sample and are determined by the network and sample architecture. The spatial distribution of Xe in its different modes of mobility and the time scales of the motion is revealed by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) at variable temperatures up to 40 K and subsequent cooling to 4 K. The system provides insight into the diffusion of a van der Waals gas on a complex structured surface and its nucleation and coarsening/growth into larger condensates at elevated temperature under thermodynamic conditions.

  • 2.
    Alarcon, E I
    et al.
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Vulesevic, B
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Argawal, A
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Ross, A
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Bejjani, P
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Podrebarac, J
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Ravichandran, Ranjithkumar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Phopase, Jaywant
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Suuronen, E J
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Coloured cornea replacements with anti-infective properties: expanding the safe use of silver nanoparticles in regenerative medicine.2016In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 8, no 12, p. 6484-6489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the broad anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), their use in bioengineered corneal replacements or bandage contact lenses has been hindered due to their intense yellow coloration. In this communication, we report the development of a new strategy to pre-stabilize and incorporate AgNPs with different colours into collagen matrices for fabrication of corneal implants and lenses, and assessed their in vitro and in vivo activity.

  • 3.
    Alarcon, Emilio I.
    et al.
    University of Ottawa, Canada; University of Ottawa, Canada; University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Udekwu, Klas I.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Noel, Christopher W.
    University of Ottawa, Canada; .
    Gagnon, Luke B. -P.
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Taylor, Patrick K.
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Vulesevic, Branka
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Simpson, Madeline J.
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Gkotzis, Spyridon
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Islam, Mohammed Mirazul
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lee, Chyan-Jang
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Mah, Thien-Fah
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Suuronen, Erik J.
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Scaiano, Juan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Safety and efficacy of composite collagen-silver nanoparticle hydrogels as tissue engineering scaffolds2015In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 7, no 44, p. 18789-18798Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing number of multidrug resistant bacteria has revitalized interest in seeking alternative sources for controlling bacterial infection. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), are amongst the most promising candidates due to their wide microbial spectrum of action. In this work, we report on the safety and efficacy of the incorporation of collagen coated AgNPs into collagen hydrogels for tissue engineering. The resulting hybrid materials at [AgNPs] less than0.4 mu M retained the mechanical properties and biocompatibility for primary human skin fibroblasts and keratinocytes of collagen hydrogels; they also displayed remarkable anti-infective properties against S. aureus, S. epidermidis, E. coli and P. aeruginosa at considerably lower concentrations than silver nitrate. Further, subcutaneous implants of materials containing 0.2 mu M AgNPs in mice showed a reduction in the levels of IL-6 and other inflammation markers (CCL24, sTNFR-2, and TIMP1). Finally, an analysis of silver contents in implanted mice showed that silver accumulation primarily occurred within the tissue surrounding the implant.

  • 4.
    Askari Ghotbabadi, Sadegh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Ulster, North Ireland.
    Ul Haq, Atta
    University of Ulster, North Ireland.
    Macias-Montero, Manuel
    University of Ulster, North Ireland.
    Levchenko, Igor
    Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
    Yu, Fengjiao
    University of St Andrews, Scotland.
    Zhou, Wuzong
    University of St Andrews, Scotland.
    (Ken) Ostrikov, Kostya
    Queensland University of Technology, Australia; Queensland University of Technology, Australia; CSIRO, Australia.
    Maguire, Paul
    University of Ulster, North Ireland.
    Svrcek, Vladimir
    National Institute Adv Ind Science and Technology, Japan.
    Mariotti, Davide
    University of Ulster, North Ireland.
    Ultra-small photoluminescent silicon-carbide nanocrystals by atmospheric-pressure plasmas2016In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 8, no 39, p. 17141-17149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Highly size-controllable synthesis of free-standing perfectly crystalline silicon carbide nanocrystals has been achieved for the first time through a plasma-based bottom-up process. This low-cost, scalable, ligand-free atmospheric pressure technique allows fabrication of ultra-small (down to 1.5 nm) nanocrystals with very low level of surface contamination, leading to fundamental insights into optical properties of the nanocrystals. This is also confirmed by their exceptional photoluminescence emission yield enhanced by more than 5 times by reducing the nanocrystals sizes in the range of 1-5 nm, which is attributed to quantum confinement in ultra-small nanocrystals. This method is potentially scalable and readily extendable to a wide range of other classes of materials. Moreover, this ligand-free process can produce colloidal nanocrystals by direct deposition into liquid, onto biological materials or onto the substrate of choice to form nanocrystal films. Our simple but efficient approach based on non-equilibrium plasma environment is a response to the need of most efficient bottom-up processes in nanosynthesis and nanotechnology.

  • 5.
    Baysal, Mustafa
    et al.
    Sabanci Univ, Turkey.
    Bilge, Kaan
    Sabanci Univ, Turkey; Imperial Coll London, England.
    Yildizhan, Melike
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Sabanci Univ, Turkey.
    Yorulmaz, Yelda
    Sabanci Univ, Turkey.
    Oncel, Cinar
    Mugla Sitki Kocaman Univ, Turkey.
    Papila, Melih
    Sabanci Univ, Turkey.
    Yurum, Yuda
    Sabanci Univ, Turkey.
    Catalytic synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes at low temperatures2018In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 10, no 10, p. 4658-4662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    KFeO2 is demonstrated to be an efficient catalyst for the formation of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) by thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD). This alkali-based catalyst enables the formation of crystalline, multi-walled BNNTs with high aspect ratio at temperatures as low as 750 degrees C, significantly lower than those typically required for the product formation by TCVD.

  • 6.
    Chen, Peng
    et al.
    Nanyang Technology University, Singapore.
    Selegård, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Nanyang Technology University, Singapore.
    Peptide functionalized gold nanoparticles for colorimetric detection of matrilysin (MMP-7) activity2013In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 5, no 19, p. 8973-8976Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A peptide with two cleavage sites for MMP-7 has been synthesized and immobilized on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) through a cysteine residue. Digestion of the peptide by MMP-7 decreases its size and net charge, which leads to the aggregation of the AuNPs. The color shift caused by aggregation enables a direct and quantitative measurement of the concentration and activity of MMP-7 with an estimated limit of detection of 5 nM (0.1 μg mL−1).

  • 7.
    Filippov, Stanislav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jansson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Stehr, Jan Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Palisaitis, Justinas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Persson, Per O. Å.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ishikawa, Fumitaro
    Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, Matsuyama, Japan.
    Chen, Weimin M.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Buyanova, Irina A.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Strongly polarized quantum-dot-like light emitters embedded in GaAs/GaNAs core/shell nanowires2016In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 8, no 35, p. 15939-15947Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent developments in fabrication techniques and extensive investigations of the physical properties of III-V semiconductor nanowires (NWs), such as GaAs NWs, have demonstrated their potential for a multitude of advanced electronic and photonics applications. Alloying of GaAs with nitrogen can further enhance the performance and extend the device functionality via intentional defects and heterostructure engineering in GaNAs and GaAs/GaNAs coaxial NWs. In this work, it is shown that incorporation of nitrogen in GaAs NWs leads to formation of three-dimensional confining potentials caused by short-range fluctuations in the nitrogen composition, which are superimposed on long-range alloy disorder. The resulting localized states exhibit a quantum-dot like electronic structure, forming optically active states in the GaNAs shell. By directly correlating the structural and optical properties of individual NWs, it is also shown that formation of the localized states is efficient in pure zinc-blende wires and is further facilitated by structural polymorphism. The light emission from these localized states is found to be spectrally narrow (similar to 50-130 mu eV) and is highly polarized (up to 100%) with the preferable polarization direction orthogonal to the NW axis, suggesting a preferential orientation of the localization potential. These properties of self-assembled nano-emitters embedded in the GaNAs-based nanowire structures may be attractive for potential optoelectronic applications.

  • 8.
    Franco Gonzalez, Juan Felipe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pavlopoulou, Eleni
    Bordeaux INP, Université de Bordeaux, CNRS, LCPO UMR 5629, 33600 Pessac, France.
    Stavrinidou, Eleni
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gabrielsson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simon, Daniel T
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zozoulenko, Igor V
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Morphology of a self-doped conducting oligomer for green energy applications2017In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 9, no 36, p. 13717-13724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A recently synthesized self-doped conducting oligomer, salt of bis[3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene]3thiophene butyric acid, ETE-S, is a novel promising material for green energy applications. Recently, it has been demonstrated that it can polymerize in vivo, in plant systems, leading to a formation of long-range conducting wires, charge storage and supercapacitive behaviour of living plants. Here we investigate the morphology of ETE-S combining the experimental characterisation using Grazing Incidence Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (GIWAXS) and atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The GIWAXS measurements reveal a formation of small crystallites consisting of π–π stacked oligomers (with the staking distance 3.5 Å) that are further organized in h00 lamellae. These experimental results are confirmed by MD calculations, where we calculated the X-ray diffraction pattern and the radial distribution function for the distance between ETE-S chains. Our MD simulations also demonstrate the formation of the percolative paths for charge carriers that extend throughout the whole structure, despite the fact that the oligomers are short (6–9 rings) and crystallites are thin along the π–π stacking direction, consisting of only two or three π–π stacked oligomers. The existence of the percolative paths explains the previously observed high conductivity in in vivo polymerized ETE-S. We also explored the geometrical conformation of ETE-S oligomers and the bending of their aliphatic chains as a function of the oligomer lengths.

  • 9.
    Imani, Roghayeh
    et al.
    Univ Ljubljana, Fac Elect Engn, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia; [ 2 ] Univ Ljubljana, Fac Hlth Sci, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia .
    Pazoki, M
    Uppsala Univ, Angstrom Lab, Dept Chem, S-75120 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Boschloo, G ()
    Uppsala Univ, Angstrom Lab, Dept Chem, S-75120 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Turner, Anthony (Contributor)
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kralj-Iglič, V (Contributor)
    Univ Ljubljana, Fac Hlth Sci, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Iglič, Ales
    Univ Ljubljana, Fac Elect Engn, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Band edge engineering of TiO2@DNA nanohybrids and implications for capacitive energy storage devices.2015In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 7, no 23, p. 10438-10448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Novel mesoporous TiO2@DNA nanohybrid electrodes, combining covalently encoded DNA with mesoporous TiO2 microbeads using dopamine as linker, were prepared and characterised for application in supercapacitors. Detailed information about donor density, charge transfer resistance and chemical capacitance, which have important role in the performance of an electrochemical device, were studied by electrochemical methods. The results indicated the improvement of electrochemical performance of TiO2 nanohybrid electrode by DNA surface functionalisation. A supercapacitor was constructed from TiO2@DNA nanohybrids with PBS as electrolyte. From the supercapacitor experiment, it was found that the addition of DNA played an important role in improving the specific capacitance (Cs) of the TiO2 supercapacitor. The highest Cs value of 8 F/g was observed for TiO2@DNA nanohybrids. The nanohybrid electrodes were shown to be stable over long-term cycling, retaining 95% of their initial specific capacitance after 1500 cycles.

  • 10.
    Krishnan, Gopi
    et al.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands; Amrita University, India.
    de Graaf, Sytze
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    ten Brink, Gert H.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Persson, Per O A
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kooi, Bart J.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Palasantzas, George
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Strategies to initiate and control the nucleation behavior of bimetallic nanoparticles2017In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 9, no 24, p. 8149-8156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work we report strategies to nucleate bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) made by gas phase synthesis of elements showing difficulty in homogeneous nucleation. It is shown that the nucleation assisted problem of bimetallic NP synthesis can be solved via the following pathways: (i) selecting an element which can itself nucleate and act as a nucleation center for the synthesis of bimetallic NPs; (ii) introducing H-2 or CH4 as an impurity/trace gas to initiate nucleation during the synthesis of bimetallic NPs. The latter can solve the problem if none of the elements in a bimetallic NP can initiate nucleation. We illustrate the above mentioned strategies for the case of Mg based bimetallic NPs, which are interesting as hydrogen storage materials and exhibit both nucleation and oxidation issues even under ultra-high vacuum conditions. In particular, it is shown that adding H2 in small proportions favors the formation of a solid solution/alloy structure even in the case of immiscible Mg and Ti, where normally phase separation occurs during synthesis. In addition, we illustrate the possibility of improving the nucleation rate, and controlling the structure and size distribution of bimetallic NPs using H-2/CH4 as a reactive/nucleating gas. This is shown to be associated with the dimer bond energies of the various formed species and the vapor pressures of the metals, which are key factors for NP nucleation.

  • 11.
    Kumawat, Naresh Kumar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Xiaoke
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kabra, Dinesh
    Indian Inst Technol, India.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Blue perovskite light-emitting diodes: progress, challenges and future directions2019In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 2109-2120Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metal halide perovskites have excellent optical and electrical properties and can be easily processed via low-cost solution-based techniques like blade-coating and inkjet printing, promising a bright future for various optoelectronic applications. Recently, encouraging progress has been made in perovskite light-emitting diodes (PeLEDs). Green, red, and near-infrared PeLEDs have achieved high external quantum efficiencies of more than 20%. However, as historically blue electroluminescence remains challenging in all previous LED technologies, we are witnessing a similar case with the development of blue PeLEDs, an essential part of displays and solid-state lighting, which lag far behind those of their counterparts. Herein, we review the recent progress of blue PeLEDs and discuss the main challenges including colour instability, poor photoluminescence efficiency and emission quenching by interlayers. Future directions are provided to facilitate the development of efficient blue PeLEDs.

  • 12.
    Lai, Chung-Chuan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fashandi, Hossein
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Palisaitis, Justinas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Persson, Per O A
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Phase formation of nanolaminated Mo2AuC and Mo-2(Au1-xGax)(2)C by a substitutional reaction within Au-capped Mo2GaC and Mo2Ga2C thin films2017In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 9, no 45, p. 17681-17687Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Au-containing nanolaminated carbides Mo2AuC and Mo-2(Au1-xGax)(2)C were synthesized by a thermally induced substitutional reaction in Mo2GaC and Mo2Ga2C, respectively. The Au substitution of the Ga layers in the structures was observed using cross-sectional high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. Expansion of c lattice parameters was also observed in the Au-containing phases compared to the original phases. Energy dispersive spectroscopy detected residual Ga in Au-substituted layers of both phases with a peculiar Ga in-plane ordering for Au : Ga = 9 : 1 ratio along the Au-Ga layers in Mo-2(Au1-xGax)(2)C. These results indicate a generalization of the Au substitution reaction for the A elements in MAX phases.

  • 13.
    Lee, Jee Woong
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Korea Adv Inst Sci and Technol, South Korea.
    Kang, Hongki
    Korea Adv Inst Sci and Technol, South Korea; Korea Adv Inst Sci and Technol, South Korea.
    Nam, Yoonkey
    Korea Adv Inst Sci and Technol, South Korea.
    Thermo-plasmonic gold nanofilms for simple and mass-producible photothermal neural interfaces2018In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 10, no 19, p. 9226-9235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, photothermal stimulation methods using plasmonic metal nanoparticles have emerged as non-genetic optical techniques in neuromodulation. Although nanoparticle-based photothermal stimulation shows great potential in the excitation and the inhibition of neural activity, the complex synthesis processes of the nanoparticles and the lack of large-area deposition methods can be limiting factors for the development of photothermal neural devices. In this paper, we propose a plasmonic gold nanofilm, fabricated by a standard thermal evaporation process, as a simple and mass-producible photothermal neural interface layer for microelectrode array (MEA) chips. The absorption of the gold nanofilm at near infrared wavelengths is optimized to maximize the photothermal effect by varying the thickness and microstructure of the gold nanofilm. With the optimized conditions, a significantly strong photothermal effect is applied on MEAs without affecting the neural signal recording capability. Finally, primary rat hippocampal neuronal cultures are used to show that the photothermal neural inhibition using the gold nanofilm is as effective as that using the plasmonic nanoparticles. Due to the greater simplicity and versatility of the fabrication process, the plasmonic gold nanofilm can provide a promising solution for the mass production of photothermal platforms.

  • 14.
    Mireles, Miguel
    et al.
    Barcelona Inst Sci and Technol, Spain.
    Morales-Dalmau, Jordi
    Barcelona Inst Sci and Technol, Spain.
    Johansson, Johannes
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Barcelona Inst Sci and Technol, Spain.
    Vidal-Rosas, Ernesto E.
    Barcelona Inst Sci and Technol, Spain.
    Vilches, Clara
    Barcelona Inst Sci and Technol, Spain.
    Martinez-Lozano, Mar
    Catalan Inst Oncol IDIBELL, Spain.
    Sanz, Vanesa
    Barcelona Inst Sci and Technol, Spain.
    de Miguel, Ignacio
    Barcelona Inst Sci and Technol, Spain.
    Casanovas, Oriol
    Catalan Inst Oncol IDIBELL, Spain.
    Quidant, Romain
    Barcelona Inst Sci and Technol, Spain; ICREA, Spain.
    Durduran, Turgut
    Barcelona Inst Sci and Technol, Spain; ICREA, Spain.
    Non-invasive and quantitative in vivo monitoring of gold nanoparticle concentration and tissue hemodynamics by hybrid optical spectroscopies2019In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 11, no 12, p. 5595-5606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Owing to their unique combination of chemical and physical properties, inorganic nanoparticles show a great deal of potential as suitable agents for early diagnostics and less invasive therapies. Yet, their translation to the clinic has been hindered, in part, by the lack of non-invasive methods to quantify their concentration in vivo while also assessing their effect on the tissue physiology. In this work, we demonstrate that diffuse optical techniques, employing near-infrared light, have the potential to address this need in the case of gold nanoparticles which support localized surface plasmons. An orthoxenograft mouse model of clear cell renal cell carcinoma was non-invasively assessed by diffuse reflectance and correlation spectroscopies before and over several days following a single intravenous tail vein injection of polyethylene glycol-coated gold nanorods (AuNRs-PEG). Our platform enables to resolve the kinetics of the AuNR-PEG uptake by the tumor in quantitative agreement with ex vivo inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Furthermore, it allows for the simultaneous monitoring of local tissue hemodynamics, enabling us to conclude that AuNRs-PEG do not significantly alter the animal physiology. We note that the penetration depth of this current probe was a few millimeters but can readily be extended to centimeters, hence gaining clinical relevance. This study and the methodology presented here complement the nanomedicine toolbox by providing a flexible platform, extendable to other absorbing agents that can potentially be translated to human trials.

  • 15.
    Palisaitis, Justinas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Persson, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Halim, Joseph
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Persson, Per O. Å.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    On the Structural Stability of MXene and the Role of Transition Metal Adatoms2018In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 10, no 23, p. 10850-10855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present communication, the atomic structure and coordination of surface adsorbed species on Nb2C MXene is investigated over time. In particular, the influence of the Nb adatoms on the structural stability and oxidation behavior of the MXene is addressed. This investigation is based on plan-view geometry observations of single Nb2C MXene sheets by a combination of atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and STEM image simulations.

  • 16.
    Parlak, Onur
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Beyazit, Selim
    Compiègne Cedex, France.
    Tse Sum Bui, Bernadette
    Compiègne Cedex, France.
    Haupt, Karsten
    Compiègne Cedex, France.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Vinoba Bhave Research Institute, Sirsa Road, Saidabad, India .
    Programmable bioelectronics in a stimuli-encoded 3D graphene interfaces2016In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 8, p. 9976-9981Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to program and mimic the dynamic microenvironment of living organisms is a crucial step towards the engineering of advanced bioelectronics. Here, we report for the first time a design for programmable bioelectronics, with ‘built-in’ switchable and tunable bio-catalytic performance that responds simultaneously to appropriate stimuli. The designed bio-electrodes comprise light and temperature responsive compartments, which allow the building of Boolean logic gates (i.e. “OR” and “AND”) based on enzymatic communications to deliver logic operations.

  • 17.
    Patra, Hirak Kumar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Sharma, Yashpal
    International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan .
    Islam, Mohammad Mirazul
    Swedish Nanoscience Center, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Arul Murugan, N.
    Virtual Laboratory for Molecular Probes, Division of Theoretical Chemistry and Biology, School of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden .
    Kobayashi, Hisatoshi
    International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan .
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan ; Tekidag AB, UCS, Linköping, Sweden; Vinoba Bhave Research Institute, Saidabad, Allahabad, India .
    Inflammation-sensitive in situ smart scaffolding for regenerative medicine2016In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 8, no 39, p. 17213-17222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To cope with the rapid evolution of the tissue engineering field, it is now essential to incorporate the use of on-site responsive scaffolds. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to find new Intelligent biomaterials that can respond to the physicochemical changes in the microenvironment. In this present report, we have developed biocompatible stimuli responsive polyaniline-multiwalled carbon nanotube/poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), (PANI-MWCNT/PNIPAm) composite nanofiber networks and demonstrated the physiological temperature coordinated cell grafting phenomenon on its surface. The composite nanofibers were prepared by a two-step process initiated with an assisted in situ polymerization followed by electro-spinning. To obtain a smooth surface in individual nanofibers with the thinnest diameter, the component ratios and electrospinning conditions were optimized. The temperature-gated rearrangements of the molecular structure are characterized by FTIR spectroscopy with simultaneous macromolecular architecture changes reflected on the surface morphology, average diameter and pore size as determined by scanning electron microscopy. The stimuli responsiveness of the nanofibers has first been optimized with computational modeling of temperature sensitive components (coil-like and globular conformations) to tune the mechanism for temperature dependent interaction during in situ scaffolding with the cell membrane. The nanofiber networks show excellent biocompatibility, tested with fibroblasts and also show excellent sensitivity to inflammation to combat loco-regional acidosis that delay the wound healing process by an in vitro model that has been developed for testing the proposed responsiveness of the composite nanofiber networks. Cellular adhesion and detachment are regulated through physiological temperature and show normal proliferation of the grafted cells on the composite nanofibers. Thus, we report for the first time, the development of physiological temperature gated inflammation-sensitive smart biomaterials for advanced tissue regeneration and regenerative medicine.

  • 18.
    Periyathambi, Prabu
    et al.
    Bio-Products Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute (CLRI), Adyar, Chennai 600 020, India .
    Vedakumari, Weslen S
    Bio-Products Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute (CLRI), Adyar, Chennai 600 020, India .
    Sastry, Thotapalli P
    Bio-Products Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute (CLRI), Adyar, Chennai 600 020, India .
    Time-dependent biodistribution, clearance and biocompatibility of magnetic fibrin nanoparticles: an in vivo study.2015In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 7, no 21, p. 9676-9685Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, bioretention and toxicity of injected nanoparticles in the body has drawn much attention in biomedical research. In the present study, 5 mg Fe per kg body weight of magnetic fibrin nanoparticles (MFNPs) were injected into mice intravenously and investigated for their blood clearance profile, biodistribution, haematology and pathology studies for a time period of 28 days. Moderately long circulation of MFNPs in blood was observed with probable degradation and excretion into the bloodstream via monoatomic iron forms. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and Prussian blue staining results showed increased accumulation of MFNPs in the liver, followed by spleen and other organs. Body weight, spleen/thymus indexes, haematology, serum biochemistry and histopathology studies demonstrated that MFNPs were biocompatible. These results suggest the feasibility of using MFNPs for drug delivery and imaging applications.

  • 19.
    Selegård, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Generic Phosphatase Activity Detection using Zinc Mediated Aggregation Modulation of Polypeptide-Modified Gold Nanoparticles2014In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 6, no 23, p. 14204-14212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A challenge in the design of plasmonic nanoparticle-based colorimetric assays is that the change in colloidal stability, which generates the colorimetric response, is often directly linked to the biomolecular recognition event. New assay strategies are hence required for every type of substrate and enzyme of interest. Here, a generic strategy for monitoring of phosphatase activity is presented where substrate recognition is completely decoupled from the nanoparticle stability modulation mechanism, which enables detection of a wide range of enzymes using different natural substrates with a single simple detection scheme. Phosphatase activity generates inorganic phosphate that forms an insoluble complex with Zn2+. In a sample containing a preset concentration of Zn2+, phosphatase activity will markedly reduce the concentration of dissolved Zn2+ from the original value, which in turn affects the aggregation of gold nanoparticles functionalized with a designed Zn2+ responsive polypeptide. The change in nanoparticle stability thus provides a rapid and sensitive readout of the phosphatase activity. The assay is not limited to a particular enzyme or enzyme substrate, which is demonstrated using three completely different phosphatases and five different substrates, and thus constitutes a highly interesting system for drug screening and diagnostics.

  • 20.
    Shrestha, Neha
    et al.
    Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium.
    Bouttefeux, Oriane
    Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium.
    Vanvarenberg, Kevin
    Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium.
    Lundquist, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Cunarro, Juan
    University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
    Tovar, Sulay
    University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
    Khodus, Georgiy
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Andersson, Ellen
    Vrinnevi Hospital, Sweden.
    Keita, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Gonzalez Dieguez, Carlos
    University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
    Artursson, Per
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Preat, Veronique
    Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium.
    Beloqui, Ana
    Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium.
    The stimulation of GLP-1 secretion and delivery of GLP-1 agonists &ITvia&IT nanostructured lipid carriers2018In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 603-613Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanoparticulate based drug delivery systems have been extensively studied to efficiently encapsulate and deliver peptides orally. However, most of the existing data mainly focus on the nanoparticles as a drug carrier, but the ability of nanoparticles having a biological effect has not been exploited. Herein, we hypothesize that nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) could activate the endogenous glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion and also act as oral delivery systems for GLP-1 analogs (exenatide and liraglutide). NLCs effectively encapsulated the peptides, the majority of which were only released under the intestinal conditions. NLCs, with and without peptide encapsulation, showed effective induction of GLP-1 secretion in vitro from the enteroendocrinal L-cells (GLUTag). NLCs also showed a 2.9-fold increase in the permeability of exenatide across the intestinal cell monolayer. The intestinal administration of the exenatide and liraglutide loaded NLCs did not demonstrate any glucose lowering effect on normal mice. Further, ex vivo studies depicted that the NLCs mainly adhered to the mucus layer. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that NLCs need further optimization to overcome the mucosal barrier in the intestine; nonetheless, this study also presents a promising strategy to use a dual-action drug delivery nanosystem which synergizes its own biological effect and that of the encapsulated drug molecule.

  • 21.
    Stehr, Jan Eric
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chen, Shula
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cai, Li
    Xi An Jiao Tong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Shen, Shaohua
    Xi An Jiao Tong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Buyanova, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Identification of a Nitrogen-related acceptor in ZnO nanowires2019In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 11, no 22, p. 10921-10926Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanostructured ZnO, such as ZnO nanowires (NWs), is a promising material system for a wide range of electronic applications ranging from light emission to water splitting. Utilization of ZnO requires development of effective and controllable p-type doping. Nitrogen is considered among key p-type dopants though the exact origin of N-induced acceptors is not fully understood, especially in the case of nanostructured ZnO. In this work we employ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to characterize N-related acceptors in ZnO NWs. N doping was achieved using ion implantation commonly employed for these purposes. We show that the Fermi level position is lowered in the N implanted NWs, indicating the formation of compensating acceptors. The formed acceptor is unambiguously proven to involve an N atom based on a resolved hyperfine interaction with a 14N nucleus with a nuclear spin I = 1. The revealed center is shown to act as a deep acceptor with an energy level located at about 1.1 eV above the top of the valence band. This work represents the first unambiguous identification of acceptors deliberately introduced in ZnO nanostructures. It also shows that the configuration and electronic structure of the N-related acceptors in nanostructures differ from those in ZnO bulk and thin-films. The present findings are of importance for understanding the electronic properties of nanostructured ZnO required for its future electronic applications.

  • 22.
    Vignoni, Mariana
    et al.
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    de Alwis Weerasekera, Hasitha
    University of Ottawa, Canada .
    Simpson, Madeline J.
    University of Ottawa, Canada .
    Phopase, Jaywant
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mah, Thien-Fah
    University of Ottawa, Canada .
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alarcon, Emilio I.
    University of Ottawa, Canada .
    Scaiano, Juan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    LL37 peptide@silver nanoparticles: combining the best of the two worlds for skin infection control2014In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 6, no 11, p. 5725-5728Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Capping silver nanoparticles with LL37 peptide eradicates the anti-proliferative effect of silver on primary skin cells, but retains the bactericidal properties of silver nanoparticles with activities comparable to silver nitrate or silver sulfadiazine. In addition, LL37 capped silver nanoparticles have anti-biofilm formation activity.

  • 23.
    Wang, Guannan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Liaoning Medical University, Jinzhou, China .
    Zhang, Xuanjun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Skallberg, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Yaxu
    Liaoning Medical University, Peoples R China Liaoning Medical University, Peoples R China .
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mei, Xifan
    Liaoning Medical University, Peoples R China .
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    One-step synthesis of water-dispersible ultra-small Fe3O4 nanoparticles as contrast agents for T-1 and T-2 magnetic resonance imaging2014In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 2953-2963Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Uniform, highly water-dispersible and ultra-small Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized via a modified one-step coprecipitation approach. The prepared Fe3O4 nanoparticles not only show good magnetic properties, long-term stability in a biological environment, but also exhibit good biocompatibility in cell viability and hemolysis assay. Due to the ultra-small sized and highly water-dispersibility, they exhibit excellent relaxivity properties, the 1.7 nm sized Fe3O4 nanoparticles reveal a low r(2)/r(1) ratio of 2.03 (r(1) = 8.20 mM(-1) s(-1), r(2) = 16.67 mM(-1) s(-1)); and the 2.2 nm sized Fe3O4 nanoparticles also appear to have a low r2/r1 ratio of 4.65 (r(1) = 6.15 mM(-1) s(-1), r(2) = 28.62 mM(-1) s(-1)). This demonstrates that the proposed ultra-small Fe3O4 nanoparticles have great potential as a new type of T-1 magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents. Especially, the 2.2 nm sized Fe3O4 nanoparticles, have a competitive r(1) value and r(2) value compared to commercial contrasting agents such as Gd-DTPA (r(1) = 4.8 mM(-1) s(-1)), and SHU-555C (r(2) = 69 mM(-1) s(-1)). In vitro and in vivo imaging experiments, show that the 2.2 nm sized Fe3O4 nanoparticles exhibit great contrast enhancement, long-term circulation, and low toxicity, which enable these ultrasmall sized Fe3O4 nanoparticles to be promising as T-1 and T-2 dual contrast agents in clinical settings.

  • 24.
    Wickham, Abeni
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Khalaf, Hazem
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Bertazzo, Sergio
    UCL, England.
    Hodder, Peter
    TA Instruments Ltd, England.
    Dånmark, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bengtsson, Torbjorn
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Altimiras, Jordi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Electroactive biomimetic collagen-silver nanowire composite scaffolds2016In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 8, no 29, p. 14146-14155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electroactive biomaterials are widely explored as bioelectrodes and as scaffolds for neural and cardiac regeneration. Most electrodes and conductive scaffolds for tissue regeneration are based on synthetic materials that have limited biocompatibility and often display large discrepancies in mechanical properties with the surrounding tissue causing problems during tissue integration and regeneration. This work shows the development of a biomimetic nanocomposite material prepared from self-assembled collagen fibrils and silver nanowires (AgNW). Despite consisting of mostly type I collagen fibrils, the homogeneously embedded AgNWs provide these materials with a charge storage capacity of about 2.3 mC cm(-2) and a charge injection capacity of 0.3 mC cm(-2), which is on par with bioelectrodes used in the clinic. The mechanical properties of the materials are similar to soft tissues with a dynamic elastic modulus within the lower kPa range. The nanocomposites also support proliferation of embryonic cardiomyocytes while inhibiting the growth of both Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis. The developed collagen/AgNW composites thus represent a highly attractive bioelectrode and scaffold material for a wide range of biomedical applications.

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