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  • 1.
    Ahsan, Aisha
    et al.
    Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Mousavi, S. Fatemeh
    Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Nijs, Thomas
    Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Nowakowska, Sylwia
    Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Popova, Olha
    Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Wackerlin, Aneliia
    Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Björk, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gade, Lutz H.
    Heidelberg Univ, Germany.
    Jung, Thomas A.
    Paul Scherrer Inst, Switzerland.
    Phase Transitions in Confinements: Controlling Solid to Fluid Transitions of Xenon Atoms in an On-Surface Network2019In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 15, no 3, article id 1803169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study reports on "phase" transitions of Xe condensates in on-surface confinements induced by temperature changes and local probe excitation. The pores of a metal-organic network occupied with 1 up to 9 Xe atoms are investigated in their propensity to undergo "condensed solid" to "confined fluid" transitions. Different transition temperatures are identified, which depend on the number of Xe atoms in the condensate and relate to the stability of the Xe clustering in the condensed "phase." This work reveals the feature-rich behavior of transitions of confined planar condensates, which provide a showcase toward future "phase-transition" storage media patterned by self-assembly. This work is also of fundamental interest as it paves the way to real space investigations of reversible solid to fluid transitions of magic cluster condensates in an array of extremely well-defined quantum confinements.

  • 2.
    Aili, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Selegård, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Baltzer, Lars
    Uppsala University .
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Colorimetric sensing: Small 21/20092009In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 5, no 21Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The cover picture illustrates a novel concept for colorimetric protein sensing based on the controllable assembly of polypeptide-functionalized gold nanoparticles. Recognition of the analyte is accomplished by polypeptide-based synthetic receptors immobilized on gold nanoparticles. Also present on the particle surface is a de novo-designed helix-loop-helix polypeptide that homodimerizes and folds into four-helix bundles in the presence of Zn2+, resulting in particle aggregation. Analyte binding interferes with the folding-induced aggregation, giving rise to a clearly detectable colorimetric response.

  • 3.
    Bernacka Wojcik, Iwona
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Huerta, Miriam
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tybrandt, Klas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karady, Michal
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Mulla, Yusuf
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Poxson, David
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gabrielsson, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ljung, Karin
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Simon, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Stavrinidou, Eleni
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Implantable Organic Electronic Ion Pump Enables ABA Hormone Delivery for Control of Stomata in an Intact Tobacco Plant2019In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 15, no 43, article id 1902189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electronic control of biological processes with bioelectronic devices holds promise for sophisticated regulation of physiology, for gaining fundamental understanding of biological systems, providing new therapeutic solutions, and digitally mediating adaptations of organisms to external factors. The organic electronic ion pump (OEIP) provides a unique means for electronically-controlled, flow-free delivery of ions, and biomolecules at cellular scale. Here, a miniaturized OEIP device based on glass capillary fibers (c-OEIP) is implanted in a biological organism. The capillary form factor at the sub-100 mu m scale of the device enables it to be implanted in soft tissue, while its hyperbranched polyelectrolyte channel and addressing protocol allows efficient delivery of a large aromatic molecule. In the first example of an implantable bioelectronic device in plants, the c-OEIP readily penetrates the leaf of an intact tobacco plant with no significant wound response (evaluated up to 24 h) and effectively delivers the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) into the leaf apoplast. OEIP-mediated delivery of ABA, the phytohormone that regulates plants tolerance to stress, induces closure of stomata, the microscopic pores in leafs epidermis that play a vital role in photosynthesis and transpiration. Efficient and localized ABA delivery reveals previously unreported kinetics of ABA-induced signal propagation.

  • 4.
    Dobrovolsky, Alexander
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Stehr, Jan Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sukrittanon, S.
    Graduate Program of Materials Science and Engineering, La Jolla, CA, USA.
    Kuang, Y.
    Department of Physics, University of California, La Jolla, CA, USA.
    Tu, C.W.
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, La Jolla, CA, USA.
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Buyanova, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fabry-Perot Microcavity Modes in Single GaP/GaNP Core/Shell Nanowires2015In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 11, no 47, p. 6331-6337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) are attracting increasing interest as nanobuilding blocks for optoelectronics and photonics. A novel material system that is highly suitable for these applications are GaNP NWs. In this article, we show that individual GaP/GaNP core/shell nanowires (NWs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si substrates can act as Fabry-Perot (FP) microcavities. This conclusion is based on results of microphotoluminescence (μ-PL) measurements performed on individual NWs, which reveal periodic undulations of the PL intensity that follow an expected pattern of FP cavity modes. The cavity is concluded to be formed along the NW axis with the end facets acting as reflecting mirrors. The formation of the FP modes is shown to be facilitated by an increasing index contrast with the surrounding media. Spectral dependence of the group refractive index is also determined for the studied NWs. The observation of the FP microcavity modes in the GaP/GaNP core/shell NWs can be considered as a first step toward achieving lasing in this quasidirect bandgap semiconductor in the NW geometry.

  • 5.
    Dobrovolsky, Alexandr
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sukrittanon, S.
    University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.
    Kuang, Y. J.
    University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.
    Tu, C. W.
    University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Buyanova, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Energy Upconversion in GaP/GaNP Core/Shell Nanowires for Enhanced Near-Infrared Light Harvesting2014In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 10, no 21, p. 4403-4408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have recently gained increasing interest due to their great potential for photovoltaics. A novel material system based on GaNP NWs is considered to be highly suitable for applications in efficient multi-junction and intermediate band solar cells. This work shows that though the bandgap energies of GaNx P1-x alloys lie within the visible spectral range (i.e., within 540-650 nm for the currently achievable x < 3%), coaxial GaNP NWs grown on Si substrates can also harvest infrared light utilizing energy upconversion. This energy upconversion can be monitored via anti-Stokes near-band-edge photoluminescence (PL) from GaNP, visible even from a single NW. The dominant process responsible for this effect is identified as being due to two-step two-photon absorption (TS-TPA) via a deep level lying at about 1.28 eV above the valence band, based on the measured dependences of the anti-Stokes PL on excitation power and wavelength. The formation of the defect participating in the TS-TPA process is concluded to be promoted by nitrogen incorporation. The revealed defect-mediated TS-TPA process can boost efficiency of harvesting solar energy in GaNP NWs, beneficial for applications of this novel material system in third-generation photovoltaic devices.

  • 6.
    Gholamrezaie, Fatemeh
    et al.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands; Philips Research Labs, Netherlands.
    Andringa, Anne-Marije
    University of Groningen, Netherlands; Philips Research Labs, Netherlands.
    Christian Roelofs, W. S.
    Philips Research Labs, Netherlands; Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Neuhold, Alfred
    Graz University of Technology, Austria.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Blom, Paul W. M.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands; Holst Centre TNO, Netherlands.
    de Leeuw, Dago M.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands; Philips Research Labs, Netherlands.
    Charge Trapping by Self-Assembled Monolayers as the Origin of the Threshold Voltage Shift in Organic Field-Effect Transistors2012In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 241-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The threshold voltage is an important property of organic field-effect transistors. By applying a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on the gate dielectric, the value can be tuned. After electrical characterization, the semiconductor is delaminated. The surface potentials of the revealed SAM perfectly agree with the threshold voltages, which demonstrate that the shift is not due to the dipolar contribution, but due to charge trapping by the SAM.

  • 7.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Elfwing, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gabrielsson, Roger H
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Electronic Polymers and DNA Self-assembled in Nanowire Transistors2013In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 363-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study the fully acidic form of PEDOT-S was used for the purpose of self-assembly onto DNA. We have previously shown that PEDOT-S is a short polymer that is self-doped with !1/3 of the sulfonate side groups acting as the self-doping sites (see supporting info.). The remaining sulfonate groups contribute to a net anionic charge, and a water-soluble polymer, with an intrinsic bulk conductivity of around 30 S/cm. It has been shown that PEDOT-S can bind to oppositely charged cationic amyloid protein structures in water and form conducting nano fibrillar networks, and it has also been shown to form hybrid structures with synthetic peptides, and gold nanoparticles.

  • 8.
    Martinsson, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Northwestern University, IL 60208 USA.
    Shahjamali, Mohammad M.
    Nanyang Technology University, Singapore.
    Large, Nicolas
    Northwestern University, IL 60208 USA.
    Zaraee, Negin
    Northwestern University, IL 60208 USA.
    Zhou, Yu
    Northwestern University, IL 60208 USA.
    Schatz, George C.
    Northwestern University, IL 60208 USA.
    Mirkin, Chad A.
    Northwestern University, IL 60208 USA.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Influence of Surfactant Bilayers on the Refractive Index Sensitivity and Catalytic Properties of Anisotropic Gold Nanoparticles2016In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 330-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shape-controlled synthesis of gold nanoparticles generally involves the use of surfactants, typically cetyltrimethylammonium (CTAX, X = Cl-, Br-), to regulate the nucleation growth process and to obtain colloidally stable nanoparticles. The surfactants adsorb on the nanoparticle surface making further functionalization difficult and therefore limit their use in many applications. Herein, the influence of CTAX on nanoparticle sensitivity to local dielectric environment changes is reported. It is shown, both experimentally and theoretically, that the CTAX bilayer significantly reduces the refractive index (RI) sensitivity of anisotropic gold nanoparticles such as nanocubes and concave nanocubes, nanorods, and nanoprisms. The RI sensitivity can be increased by up to 40% by removing the surfactant layer from nanoparticles immobilized on a solid substrate using oxygen plasma treatment. This increase compensates for the otherwise problematic decrease in RI sensitivity caused by the substrate effect. Moreover, the removal of the surfactants both facilitates nanoparticle biofunctionalization and significantly improves their catalytic properties. The strategy presented herein is a simple yet effective universal method for enhancing the RI sensitivity of CTAX-stabilized gold nanoparticles and increasing their potential as transducers in nanoplasmonic sensors, as well as in catalytic and biomedical applications.

  • 9.
    Nowakowska, Sylwia
    et al.
    Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Wäckerlin, Aneliia
    Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Piquero-Zulaica, Ignacio
    Centro de Física de Materiales (CSIC/UPV-EHU)—Materials Physics Center, San Sebastián, Spain.
    Nowakowski, Jan
    Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, PSI, Switzerland.
    Kawai, Shigeki
    Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama, Japan.
    Wäckerlin, Christian
    Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, PSI, Switzerland.
    Matena, Manfred
    Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), San Sebastián, Spain.
    Nijs, Thomas
    Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Fatayer, Shadi
    Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; Departamento de Física Aplicada, Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
    Popova, Olha
    Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Ahsan, Aisha
    Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Mousavi, S. Fatemeh
    Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Ivas, Toni
    Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Meyer, Ernst
    Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Stöhr, Meike
    Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, AG, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Ortega, J. Enrique
    Centro de Física de Materiales (CSIC/UPV-EHU)—Materials Physics Center, San Sebastián, Spain; Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), San Sebastián, Spain; Departamento Física Aplicada I, Universidad del País Vasco, San Sebastián, Spain.
    Björk, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gade, Lutz H.
    Anorganisch-Chemisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Lobo-Checa, Jorge
    Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain; Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Jung, Thomas A.
    Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, PSI, Switzerland.
    Configuring Electronic States in an Atomically Precise Array of Quantum Boxes2016In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 12, no 28, p. 3757-3763Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A 2D array of electronically coupled quantum boxes is fabricated by means of on-surface self-assembly assuring ultimate precision of each box. The quantum states embedded in the boxes are configured by adsorbates, whose occupancy is controlled with atomic precision. The electronic interbox coupling can be maintained or significantly reduced by proper arrangement of empty and filled boxes.

  • 10.
    Persson, Ingemar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    El Ghazaly, Ahmed
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tao, Quanzheng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Halim, Joseph
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kota, Sankalp
    Drexel Univ, PA 19104 USA.
    Darakchieva, Vanya
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Palisaitis, Justinas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Barsoum, Michel W.
    Drexel Univ, PA 19104 USA.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Persson, Per O A
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tailoring Structure, Composition, and Energy Storage Properties of MXenes from Selective Etching of In-Plane, Chemically Ordered MAX Phases2018In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 14, no 17, article id 1703676Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The exploration of 2D solids is one of our times generators of materials discoveries. A recent addition to the 2D world is MXenes that possses a rich chemistry due to the large parent family of MAX phases. Recently, a new type of atomic laminated phases (coined i-MAX) is reported, in which two different transition metal atoms are ordered in the basal planes. Herein, these i-MAX phases are used in a new route for tailoriong the MXene structure and composition. By employing different etching protocols to the parent i-MAX phase (Mo2/3Y1/3)(2)AlC, the resulting MXene can be either: i) (Mo2/3Y1/3)(2)C with in-plane elemental order through selective removal of Al atoms or ii) Mo1.33C with ordered vacancies through selective removal of both Al and Y atoms. When (Mo2/3Y1/3)(2)C (ideal stoichiometry) is used as an electrode in a supercapacitor-with KOH electrolytea volumetric capacitance exceeding 1500 F cm(-3) is obtained, which is 40% higher than that of its Mo1.33C counterpart. With H2SO4, the trend is reversed, with the latter exhibiting the higher capacitance (approximate to 1200 F cm(-3)). This additional ability for structural tailoring will indubitably prove to be a powerful tool in property-tailoring of 2D materials, as exemplified here for supercapacitors.

  • 11.
    Soni, Gautam V.
    et al.
    Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Jonsson, Magnus P.
    Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Dekker, Cees
    Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Periodic Modulations of Optical Tweezers Near Solid-State Membranes2013In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 679-684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Optical tweezers operated near solid-state membranes show unexplained periodic modulations in the optical trap position. An experimental study of the oscillations is presented, as well as optical simulations based on the finite-difference time-domain method, providing insight into the underlying interference phenomenon. This work provides a complete description as well as a solution to the enduring problem of modulations in optical traps near solid-state membranes.

  • 12.
    Tybrandt, Klas
    et al.
    Institute for Biomedical Engineering, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Vörös, Janos
    Institute for Biomedical Engineering, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Fast and Efficient Fabrication of Intrinsically Stretchable Multilayer Circuit Boards by Wax Pattern Assisted Filtration2016In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 180-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intrinsically stretchable multilayer circuit boards are fabricated with a fast and material efficient method based on filtration. Silver nanowire conductor patterns of outstanding performance are defined by filtration through wax printed membranes and the circuit board is assembled by subsequent transfers of the nanowires onto the elastomer substrate. The method is used to fabricate a bright stretchable light emitting diode matrix display.

  • 13.
    Wang, Zhen
    et al.
    Department of Fibre and Polymer Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Malti, Abdellah
    Department of Fibre and Polymer Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    Department of Fibre and Polymer Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tu, Deyu
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Information Coding. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tian, Weiqian
    Department of Fibre and Polymer Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wagberg, Lars
    Department of Fibre and Polymer Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden; Wallenberg Wood Science Centre, Department of Fibre and Polymer Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hamedi, Mahiar Max
    Department of Fibre and Polymer Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Copper-Plated Paper for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries2018In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 14, no 48, article id 1803313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Paper is emerging as a promising flexible, high surface-area substrate for various new applications such as printed electronics, energy storage, and paper-based diagnostics. Many applications, however, require paper that reaches metallic conductivity levels, ideally at low cost. Here, an aqueous electroless copper-plating method is presented, which forms a conducting thin film of fused copper nanoparticles on the surface of the cellulose fibers. This paper can be used as a current collector for anodes of lithium-ion batteries. Owing to the porous structure and the large surface area of cellulose fibers, the copper-plated paper-based half-cell of the lithium-ion battery exhibits excellent rate performance and cycling stability, and even outperforms commercially available planar copper foil-based anode at ultra-high charge/discharge rates of 100 C and 200 C. This mechanically robust metallic-paper composite has promising applications as the current collector for light-weight, flexible, and foldable paper-based 3D Li-ion battery anodes.

  • 14.
    Yu, Hongling
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wang, Heyong
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhang, Jiangbin
    Univ Cambridge, England; Imperial Coll London, England.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yuan, Zhongcheng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Xu, Weidong
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Nanjing Tech Univ, Peoples R China.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bakulin, Artem A.
    Imperial Coll London, England.
    Friend, Richard H.
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Wang, Jianpu
    Nanjing Tech Univ, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Xiaoke
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Cambridge, England.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Efficient and Tunable Electroluminescence from In Situ Synthesized Perovskite Quantum Dots2019In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 15, no 8, article id 1804947Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are among the most promising next-generation optoelectronic materials. QDs are generally obtained through either epitaxial or colloidal growth and carry the promise for solution-processed high-performance optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs), solar cells, etc. Herein, a straightforward approach to synthesize perovskite QDs and demonstrate their applications in efficient LEDs is reported. The perovskite QDs with controllable crystal sizes and properties are in situ synthesized through one-step spin-coating from perovskite precursor solutions followed by thermal annealing. These perovskite QDs feature size-dependent quantum confinement effect (with readily tunable emissions) and radiative monomolecular recombination. Despite the substantial structural inhomogeneity, the in situ generated perovskite QDs films emit narrow-bandwidth emission and high color stability due to efficient energy transfer between nanostructures that sweeps away the unfavorable disorder effects. Based on these materials, efficient LEDs with external quantum efficiencies up to 11.0% are realized. This makes the technologically appealing in situ approach promising for further development of state-of-the-art LED systems and other optoelectronic devices.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-01-28 13:23
  • 15.
    Zhu, Qing
    et al.
    Ecole Polytech, Lausanne.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Byszewski, Marcin
    Ecole Polytech, Lausanne.
    Rudra, Alok
    Ecole Polytech, Lausanne.
    Pelucchi, Emanuele
    Ecole Polytech, Lausanne.
    He, Zhanbing
    Ecole Polytech, Lausanne.
    Kapon, Eli
    Ecole Polytech, Lausanne.
    Hybridization of Electron and Hole States in Semiconductor Quantum-Dot Molecules2009In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 329-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel QD-molecule system is realized using metal–organic vapor-phase epitaxy growth. The dots are tunnel coupled via connected quantum wires (QWRs). The stronger tunnel coupling in this integrated QD-QWR system allows the hybridization of both electron and hole states, yielding direct-real-space excitonic molecules (see image). The structure holds promise for nanophotonic devices for quantum-information-processing applications.

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