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  • 1.
    Cirillo, Marco Domenico
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mirdell, Robin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Brännskadeavdelningen, Linköpings Universitetssjukhus.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Brännskadeavdelningen, Linköpings Universitetssjukhus.
    Pham, Tuan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Time-Independent Prediction of Burn Depth using Deep Convolutional Neural NetworksIn: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present in this paper the application of deep convolutional neural networks, which are a state-of-the-art artificial intelligence (AI) approach in machine learning, for automated time-independent prediction of burn depth. Colour images of four types of burn depth injured in first few days, including normal skin and background, acquired by a TiVi camera were trained and tested with four pre-trained deep convolutional neural networks: VGG-16, GoogleNet, ResNet-50, and ResNet-101. In the end, the best 10-fold cross-validation results obtained from ResNet- 101 with an average, minimum, and maximum accuracy are 81.66%, 72.06% and 88.06%, respectively; and the average accuracy, sensitivity and specificity for the four different types of burn depth are 90.54%, 74.35% and 94.25%, respectively. The accuracy was compared to the clinical diagnosis obtained after the wound had healed. Hence, application of AI is very promising for prediction of burn depth and therefore can be a useful tool to help in guiding clinical decision and initial treatment of burn wounds.

  • 2.
    Cirillo, Marco Domenico
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mirdell, Robin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Pham, Tuan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Time-Independent Prediction of Burn Depth using Deep Convolutional Neural Networks2019In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present in this paper the application of deep convolutional neural networks, which are a state-of-the-art artificial intelligence (AI) approach in machine learning, for automated time-independent prediction of burn depth. Colour images of four types of burn depth injured in first few days, including normal skin and background, acquired by a TiVi camera were trained and tested with four pre-trained deep convolutional neural networks: VGG-16, GoogleNet, ResNet-50, and ResNet-101. In the end, the best 10-fold cross-validation results obtained from ResNet- 101 with an average, minimum, and maximum accuracy are 81.66%, 72.06% and 88.06%, respectively; and the average accuracy, sensitivity and specificity for the four different types of burn depth are 90.54%, 74.35% and 94.25%, respectively. The accuracy was compared to the clinical diagnosis obtained after the wound had healed. Hence, application of AI is very promising for prediction of burn depth and therefore can be a useful tool to help in guiding clinical decision and initial treatment of burn wounds.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-06-11 08:35
  • 3.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Plast Surg Unit, Dept Surg, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abbas, Ashraf H.
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Adly, Osama A.
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Treatment of Children With Scalds by Xenografts: Report From a Swedish Burn Centre2016In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 37, no 6, p. E586-E591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scalds are the most common type of burn in children, and one way to treat them is with xenografts with no topical antimicrobials in line with the recommendations of a recent review. However, this treatment has not been examined in detail. Our aim was to describe the treatment of such children when biological dressings (xenografts) were used without local antimicrobials. We reviewed the medical records of all children admitted to a Swedish National Burn Centre during the period 2010-2012 with scalds who were treated with xenografts. Percentage TBSA injured, age, length of hospital stay, number of operations, antibiotics given, duration of antibiotic treatment, and pain score during the first 3 days, application of xenografts, and clinical notes of wound infection were recorded. We studied 67 children, (43 of whom were boys), with a median (interquartile range [IQR]) age of 1 (1-2) year and median (IQR) TBSA% 6.2 (4-11). Twenty children (30%) required operation. Twelve (18%) developed a wound infection, 29 (43%) had other infections, and 26 (39%) were free from infection. The median (IQR) duration of systemic antibiotics was 10 (6-13) days. On the day that the xenografts were applied 10 of the children had a Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, and Consolability (FLACC) score between 3 and 7, and during the following 2 days, only four children scored in this range. The remaining 57 children had scores amp;lt;3 on the day that xenografts were applied and on the following 2 days. Median (IQR) length of stay/TBSA% was 0.7 (0.4-1.0). Treatment with xenografts was associated with median length of stay/TBSA% amp;lt; 1 and low pain scores. Despite a high rate of prescription of systemic antibiotics, most were for reasons other than wound infection.

  • 4.
    Johansson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Östersund Hospital, Östersund, Sweden.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Herwald, Heiko
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Lindbom, Lennart
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Alteration of Leukocyte Count Correlates With Increased Pulmonary Vascular Permeability and Decreased PaO2:FiO(2) Ratio Early After Major Burns2015In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 484-492Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leukocytes are activated systemically and their numbers increase soon after a burn followed by a rapid decline to low normal or subnormal levels, possibly by increased extravasation. Experimental data support that an important target for such extravasation is the lungs and that leukocytes when they adhere to endothelial cells cause an increase in vascular permeability. The authors investigated a possible relation between early increased pulmonary vascular permeability or a decreased PaO2:FiO(2) ratio and the dynamic change in concentration of blood leukocytes after a burn. This is a prospective, exploratory, single-center study. The authors measured the dynamic changes of leukocytes in blood starting early after the burn, pulmonary vascular permeability index by thermodilution, and PaO2:FiO(2)-ratios in 20 patients during the first 21 days after a major burn (greater than20% TBSA%). Median TBSA was 40% interquartile range (IQR, 25-52) and full thickness burn 28% (IQR, 2-39). There was a correlation between the early (less than24 hours) alteration in white blood cell count and both early increased pulmonary vascular permeability (r = .63, P = .004) and the decreased oxygenation index defined as PaO2:FiO(2) less than 27 kPa (P = .004). The authors have documented a correlation between dynamic change of blood leukocytes and pulmonary failure early after burns.

  • 5.
    Ponticorvo, A.
    et al.
    Beckman Laser Institute, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA; US Army Institute of Surgical Research, San Antonio, TX; University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA.
    Rowland, R.
    Beckman Laser Institute, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA; US Army Institute of Surgical Research, San Antonio, TX; University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA.
    Baldado, M.
    Beckman Laser Institute, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA; US Army Institute of Surgical Research, San Antonio, TX; University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA.
    Kennedy, G. T.
    Beckman Laser Institute, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA; US Army Institute of Surgical Research, San Antonio, TX; University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA.
    Saager, Rolf B.
    Beckman Laser Institute, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA; US Army Institute of Surgical Research, San Antonio, TX; University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA.
    Burmeister, D. M.
    Beckman Laser Institute, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA; US Army Institute of Surgical Research, San Antonio, TX; University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA.
    Christy, R. J.
    Beckman Laser Institute, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA; US Army Institute of Surgical Research, San Antonio, TX; University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA.
    Bernal, N.
    Beckman Laser Institute, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA; US Army Institute of Surgical Research, San Antonio, TX; University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA.
    Durkin, A. J.
    Beckman Laser Institute, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA; US Army Institute of Surgical Research, San Antonio, TX; University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA.
    529 Evaluating Clinical Observation, Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (SFDI) and Laser Speckle Imaging (LSI) for the Assessment of Burns2018In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 39, no Suppl_1, p. S238-S239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    The current standard for diagnosis of burn severity and subsequent wound healing is through clinical examination, which is highly subjective. Several new technologies focus on burn care in an attempt to help clinicians quantify burn severity earlier and more accurately. Laser Speckle Imaging (LSI) is a technique that quantifies perfusion to assess burn wounds while Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (SFDI) can quantify the structural damage caused by burns. Here we test each system’s ability to categorize burn wounds and compare their performance.

    Methods

    Clinical assessment of a Yorkshire pig (n=3) graded burn model was performed at 24 hours after burn injury. A commercial LSI (Periscan PIM 3, Perimed Inc.) and SFDI (OxImager RS, MI Inc.) device were used to measure hemodynamic (blood flow) and structural (reduced scattering coefficient) properties of the burn wounds. Burn severity was confirmed by histology. Additionally, both devices were used to collect preliminary data on clinical patients.

    Results

    Clinical assessments in the swine model were 83% percent accurate, while the LSI and SFDI systems were 81% and 85% percent accurate respectively. In addition to being more accurate than LSI in this study, SFDI data suggests that it can spatially resolve the heterogeneity of burn severity within a burn wound. This was not observed using the commercial LSI device. Preliminary results on clinical patients also showed both devices were capable of non-invasively predicting burn regions that would eventually require grafting.

    Conclusions

    The testing of these different imaging modalities in a controlled environment allows a direct comparison. Here we show that SFDI is capable of categorizing burn wounds in a swine model of histologically confirmed graded burn severity more accurately than clinical assessment or LSI. SFDI is also able to resolve spatial heterogeneity of burn severity within a wound. SFDI has the potential to improve clinical care with additional information related to tissue structure and function, thus aiding clinicians to make decisions on how to treat burn wounds accurately at earlier time points. Additionally, these noninvasive imaging technologies have the potential to enhance tracking of wound progression and treatment efficacy.

    Applicability of Research to Practice

    By improving diagnostic accuracy of which burn areas will require grafting, these devices may aid clinicians make appropriate treatment decisions sooner.

  • 6.
    Rakkolainen, Ilmari
    et al.
    Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki Burn Centre, Helsinki University Hospital, Finland; University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Surgery Department, Plastic Surgery Unit, Suez Canal University, Egypt .
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Vuola, Jyrki
    Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki Burn Centre, Helsinki University Hospital, Finland; University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    N-Terminal Brain Natriuretic Peptide First Week After Burn Injury2018In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 805-810Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    B-type natriuretic peptide has shown promising results as a biomarker for acute kidney injury in general intensive care patients. It may also indirectly reflect fluid balance of the circulation. Among burn patients, it has been observed to indicate excessive fluid resuscitation and organ dysfunction, although its clinical use to indicate acute kidney injury or guide fluid resuscitation has not been validated. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide values are related to the amount of fluids given after severe burn injury and whether it can act as a novel biomarker for acute kidney injury in these patients. Nineteen consecutive burn patients were included. Plasma N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide was measured daily during 1 week from admission. Other variables such as laboratory values and intravenous infusions were also recorded. The association between acute kidney injury and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide values was analyzed with a multivariable panel regression model, adjusted for burned total body surface area, age, body mass index, and laboratory values. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide values varied between single patients, and even more between the patients who developed acute kidney injury. Older age, lower body mass index, and cumulative infusions were independently associated with higher N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide values, whereas acute kidney injury was not. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide values correlated with cumulative infusions given during the first week. The authors could not validate the role of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide as a biomarker for acute kidney injury in burns.

  • 7.
    Tokarik, Monika
    et al.
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic .
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Balik, Martin
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic .
    Pafcuga, Igor
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic .
    Broz, Ludomir
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic .
    Fluid Therapy LiDCO Controlled Trial-Optimization of Volume Resuscitation of Extensively Burned Patients through Noninvasive Continuous Real-Time Hemodynamic Monitoring LiDCO2013In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 537-542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This pilot trial aims at gaining support for the optimization of acute burn resuscitation through noninvasive continuous real-time hemodynamic monitoring using arterial pulse contour analysis. A group of 21 burned patients meeting preliminary criteria (age range 18-75 years with second- third- degree burns and TBSA 10-75%) was randomized during 2010. A hemodynamic monitoring through lithium dilution cardiac output was used in 10 randomized patients (LiDCO group), whereas those without LiDCO monitoring were defined as the control group. The modified Brooke/Parkland formula as a starting resuscitative formula, balanced crystalloids as the initial solutions, urine output of 0.5ml/kg/hr as a crucial value of adequate intravascular filling were used in both groups. Additionally, the volume and vasopressor/inotropic support were based on dynamic preload parameters in the LiDCO group in the case of circulatory instability and oligouria. Statistical analysis was done using t-tests. Within the first 24 hours postburn, a significantly lower consumption of crystalloids was registered in LiDCO group (P = .04). The fluid balance under LiDCO control in combination with hourly diuresis contributed to reducing the cumulative fluid balance approximately by 10% compared with fluid management based on standard monitoring parameters. The amount of applied solutions in the LiDCO group got closer to Brooke formula whereas the urine output was at the same level in both groups (0.8ml/kg/hr). The new finding in this study is that when a fluid resuscitation is based on the arterial waveform analysis, the initial fluid volume provided was significantly lower than that delivered on the basis of physician-directed fluid resuscitation (by urine output and mean arterial pressure). (J Burn Care Res 2013;34:537-542)

  • 8.
    Zötterman, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Surgery Department, Plastic Surgery Unit, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Better Protection of Glass-Fronted Stoves Is Needed in Sweden Because of the Increase in the Number of Contact Burns Among Small Children2018In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 618-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impression among the attending physicians at their Burn Centre is that the number of contact burns caused by glass-fronted stoves is increasing, particularly in the youngest group of patients. It is an interesting subgroup, as these injuries are preventable. The authors’ aim of this study was to find out whether the incidence of burns after contact with glass-fronted stoves has increased.

    The authors included all patients aged between 0 and 3.9 years who presented to the National Burn Centre during the period 2008–2015 with contact burn injuries caused by glass-fronted stoves. The change in incidence over time was calculated from national records and analyzed with simple linear regression.

    Fifty-six patients were included, of whom 20 were treated during the past 2 years of the study. Thirty-seven of the 56 were boys (66%), median (10–90 percentiles) age was 1.1 (0.7–2.5) years, percentage total body surface area burned was 0.6% (0.1–2.0), 12 were admitted for overnight stay in hospital, and seven needed operations. The incidence was 0.34/100 000 children-years during the first 2 years, and it was three times as high during the past 2 years. The increase in incidence was 0.24/100 000 children-years by each 2-year period (P = .02).

    The authors’ results indicate that contact burns among children caused by glass-fronted stoves are increasing in Sweden. The authors propose that there should be a plan for their prevention put in place.

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