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  • 1.
    Azahar Ali, Md.
    et al.
    CSIR, India; Indian Institute Technology Hyderabad, India.
    Srivastava, Saurabh
    CSIR, India; Delhi Technology University, India.
    Agrawal, Ved V.
    CSIR, India.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    John, Renu
    Indian Institute Technology Hyderabad, India.
    Malhotra, Bansi D.
    Delhi Technology University, India.
    A biofunctionalized quantum dot-nickel oxide nanorod based smart platform for lipid detection2016In: Journal of materials chemistry. B, ISSN 2050-750X, E-ISSN 2050-7518, Vol. 4, no 15, p. 2706-2714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A reagent-free, low-cost and sensitive immunosensor has been fabricated using anti-apolipoprotein B (AAB) conjugated L-cysteine in situ capped cadmium sulfide quantum dots (CysCdS QDs) bound to nickel oxide nanorods (nNiO) for detection of low density lipoprotein (LDL) molecules in human serum samples. The structural and morphological properties of AAB conjugated CysCdS QDs and nNiO have been investigated using electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and UV-visible techniques. In this immunosensor, the synthesized NiO nanorods act as mediators that allow the direct electron transfer due to their channeling effect resulting in a mediator-free biosensor. This mediator-free CysCdS-NiO based immunosensor shows improved characteristics such as a good sensitivity of 32.08 mu A (mg dl(-1))(-1) cm(-2) compared to that based on nNiO (1.42 mA (mg dl(-1))(-1) cm(-2)) alone for detection of lipid (LDL) molecules over a wide concentration range, 5-120 mg dl(-1) (0.015-0.36 mu M). The kinetic analysis yields an association constant (K-a) of 3.24 kM(-1) s(-1), indicating that the antibody conjugated CysCdS-NiO platform has a strong affinity towards lipid molecules. The excellent electron transport properties of the CysCdS-NiO nanocomposite in this immunosensor reveal that it provides an efficient platform for routine quantification of LDL molecules in real samples.

  • 2.
    Gelmi, Amy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rafat, Mehrdad
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Influence of conductive polymer doping on the viability of cardiac progenitor cells2014In: Journal of materials chemistry. B, ISSN 2050-750X, E-ISSN 2050-7518, Vol. 2, no 24, p. 3860-3867Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiac tissue engineering via the use of stem cells is the future for repairing impaired heart function that results from a myocardial infarction. Developing an optimised platform to support the stem cells is vital to realising this, and through utilising new smart materials such as conductive polymers we can provide a multi-pronged approach to supporting and stimulating the stem cells via engineered surface properties, electrical, and electromechanical stimulation. Here we present a fundamental study on the viability of cardiac progenitor cells on conductive polymer surfaces, focusing on the impact of surface properties such as roughness, surface energy, and surface chemistry with variation of the polymer dopant molecules. The conductive polymer materials were shown to provide a viable support for both endothelial and cardiac progenitor cells, while the surface energy and roughness were observed to influence viability for both progenitor cell types. Characterising the interaction between the cardiac progenitor cells and the conductive polymer surface is a critical step towards optimising these materials for cardiac tissue regeneration, and this study will advance the limited knowledge on biomaterial surface interactions with cardiac cells.

  • 3.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Tongji University, Shanghai, China .
    Hu, Jiwen
    Tongji University, Shanghai, China .
    Cui, Yang
    Tongji University, Shanghai, China .
    Wang, Guannan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zhang, Xuanjun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gao, Hong-Wen
    Tongji University, Shanghai, China .
    A facile "click" reaction to fabricate a FRET-based ratiometric fluorescent Cu2+ probe2014In: Journal of materials chemistry. B, ISSN 2050-750X, E-ISSN 2050-7518, Vol. 2, no 28, p. 4467-4472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A facile one-step Cu(I)-catalyzed "click" reaction, between a dansyl-azide and a propargyl-substituted rhodamine B hydrazide, is employed to fabricate a novel FRET ratiometric "off-on" fluorescent probe. The sensitive emission of the donor, a dansyl group, overlaps perfectly with the absorption of the acceptor, xanthene in the open-ring rhodamine. The proposed probe shows high selectivity towards Cu2+. The ratio of emission intensities at 568 and 540 nm (I-568/I-540) exhibits a drastic 28-fold enhancement upon addition of Cu2+. The probe shows an excellent linear relationship between emission ratios and the concentrations of Cu2+ from 10 to 50 mu M, with a detection limit (S/N = 3) of 0.12 mu M. The preliminary cellular studies demonstrated that the probe is cell membrane permeable and could be applied for ratiometric fluorescence imaging of intracellular Cu2+ with almost no cytotoxicity. The ingenuity of the probe design is to construct a FRET donor-acceptor interconnector and a selective receptor simultaneously by "click" reaction. The strategy was verified to have great potential for developing novel FRET probes for Cu2+.

  • 4.
    Kumar, Saurabh
    et al.
    Delhi Technology University, India.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sharma, Jai G.
    Delhi Technology University, India.
    Malhotra, Bansi D.
    Delhi Technology University, India.
    A solution processed carbon nanotube modified conducting paper sensor for cancer detection2015In: Journal of materials chemistry. B, ISSN 2050-750X, E-ISSN 2050-7518, Vol. 3, no 48, p. 9305-9314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A solution processed poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS)-carbon nanotube (CNT) nano-composite has been utilized for the fabrication of a conducting paper (CP) via dip coating. Further, high conductivity of this paper (from similar to 6.5 x 10(-4) to 2.2 x 10(-2) S cm(-1)) obtained by treating it with formic acid (CNT/FA@CP) is due to the removal of the non-conducting PSS molecules from its surface. This smart conducting platform has been used for the conjugation of the anti-carcinoembronic antigen (CEA) protein for quantitative estimation of CEA, a cancer biomarker. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and amperometric techniques have been used to characterize the low cost, flexible and environmentally friendly conducting BSA/anti-CEA/CNT/FA@CP) paper electrode that is found to be highly sensitive (7.8 mu A ng(-1) ml cm(-2)) in the physiological range (2-15 ng ml(-1)) of CEA. The response of the paper electrode is validated using CEA concentration of serum samples of cancer patients obtained via the immunoassay technique.

  • 5.
    Parlak, Onur
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony P. F.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Tekidag AB, UCS, Mjärdevi Science Park, Linköping Sweden.
    pH-induced on/off-switchable graphene bioelectronics2015In: Journal of materials chemistry. B, ISSN 2050-750X, E-ISSN 2050-7518, Vol. 3, no 37, p. 7434-7439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Switchable interfaces can deliver functionally reversible reactivity with their corresponding analytes, which thus allows one to positively respond the activity of biological elements, including enzymes and other biomolecules, through an encoded stimulus. We have realised this by the design of stimuli-responsive graphene interfaces for pH-encoded operation of bioelectronics. In this study, we have demonstrated stimuli-responsive graphene interfaces for pH-encoded operation of bioelectronics. The resulting switchable interfaces are capable of highly specific, on-demand operation of biosensors, which has significant potential in a wide range of analytical applications.

  • 6.
    Ravichandran, Ranjithkumar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Phopase, Jaywant
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Applications of self-assembling peptide scaffolds in regenerative medicine: the way to the clinic2014In: Journal of materials chemistry. B, ISSN 2050-750X, E-ISSN 2050-7518, Vol. 2, no 48, p. 8466-8478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Peptides that self-assemble into well-defined nanofibrous networks provide a prominent alternative to traditional biomaterials for fabricating scaffolds for use in regenerative medicine and other biomedical applications. Such scaffolds can be generated by decorating a peptide backbone with other bioactives such as cell specific adhesion peptides, growth factors and enzyme cleavable sequences. They can be designed to mimic the three-dimensional (3D) structural features of native ECM and can therefore also provide insight into the ECM-cell interactions needed for development of scaffolds that can serve as regeneration templates for specific target tissues or organs. This review highlights the potential application of self-assembling peptides in regenerative medicine.

  • 7.
    Ravichandran, Ranjithkumar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Islam, M. M.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Alarcon, E. I.
    University of Ottawa, Canada; Fac Med, Canada.
    Samanta, Ayan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wang, S.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lundström, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hilborn, J.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Phopase, Jaywant
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Correction: Functionalised type-1 collagen as a hydrogel building block for bio-orthogonal tissue engineering applications (vol 4, pg 318, 2016)2017In: Journal of materials chemistry. B, ISSN 2050-750X, E-ISSN 2050-7518, Vol. 5, no 26, p. 5284-5284Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 8.
    Ravichandran, Ranjithkumar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Islam, M. M.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; .
    Alarcon, E. I.
    University of Ottawa, Canada; .
    Samanta, Ayan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wang, S.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lundström, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hilborn, J.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Phopase, Jaywant
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Functionalised type-I collagen as a hydrogel building block for bio-orthogonal tissue engineering applications2016In: Journal of materials chemistry. B, ISSN 2050-750X, E-ISSN 2050-7518, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 318-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we derivatized type I collagen without altering its triple helical conformation to allow for facile hydrogel formation via the Michael addition of thiols to methacrylates without the addition of other crosslinking agents. This method provides the flexibility needed for the fabrication of injectable hydrogels or pre-fabricated implantable scaffolds, using the same components by tuning the modulus from Pa to kPa. Enzymatic degradability of the hydrogels can also be easily fine-tuned by variation of the ratio and the type of the crosslinking component. The structural morphology reveals a lamellar structure mimicking native collagen fibrils. The versatility of this material is demonstrated by its use as a pre-fabricated substrate for culturing human corneal epithelial cells and as an injectable hydrogel for 3-D encapsulation of cardiac progenitor cells.

  • 9.
    Sen Karaman, D.
    et al.
    Abo Akad University, Finland; Abo Akad University, Finland.
    Sarwar, S.
    Bose Institute, India.
    Desai, D.
    Abo Akad University, Finland.
    Björk, Emma
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Odén, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chakrabarti, P.
    Bose Institute, India.
    Rosenholm, J. M.
    Abo Akad University, Finland.
    Chakraborti, S.
    Bose Institute, India; Indiana University, IN USA.
    Shape engineering boosts antibacterial activity of chitosan coated mesoporous silica nanoparticle doped with silver: a mechanistic investigation2016In: Journal of materials chemistry. B, ISSN 2050-750X, E-ISSN 2050-7518, Vol. 4, no 19, p. 3292-3304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSPs) of different size and shape were developed, and their surface coatings were utilized to study their differential effects in enhancing antibacterial activity. In brief, MSPs with three different aspect ratios (1, 2 and 4) were prepared, doped with silver ions and finally coated with the polymer chitosan. Both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were treated with the MSPs. Results indicate that silver ion doped and chitosan coated MSPs with the aspect ratio of 4 (Cht/MSP4:Ag+) have the highest antimicrobial activity among the prepared series. Further studies revealed that Cht/MSP4:Ag+ was most effective against Escherichia coli (E.coli) and least effective against Vibrio cholerae (V. cholerae). To investigate the detailed inhibition mechanism of the MSPs, the interaction of the nanoparticles with E.coli membranes and its intracellular DNA was assessed using various spectroscopic and imaging-based techniques. Furthermore, to increase the efficiency of the MSPs, a combinatorial antibacterial strategy was also explored, where nanoparticles, in combination with kanamycin (antibiotic), were used against Vibrio Cholerae (V. cholerae). Toxicity screening of these on MSPs was conducted on Caco-2 cells, and the results show that the dose used for antibacterial screening is below the limit of the toxicity threshold. Our findings show that both shape and surface engineering contribute positively towards killing bacteria, and the newly developed silver ion-doped and chitosan-coated MSPs have good potential as antimicrobial nanomaterials.

  • 10.
    Wang, Guannan
    et al.
    Liaoning Medical University, Peoples R China; Liaoning Medical University, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Xuanjun
    University of Macau, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Yaxu
    Liaoning Medical University, Peoples R China; Liaoning Medical University, Peoples R China.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mei, Xifan
    Liaoning Medical University, Peoples R China; Liaoning Medical University, Peoples R China.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Magneto-fluorescent nanoparticles with high-intensity NIR emission, T-1-and T-2-weighted MR for multimodal specific tumor imaging2015In: Journal of materials chemistry. B, ISSN 2050-750X, E-ISSN 2050-7518, Vol. 3, no 15, p. 3072-3080Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanoparticles exhibiting bright near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence, T-1-and T-2-weighted MR were synthesized for specific tumor imaging. Clinically used Fe3O4 nanoparticles exhibit an intrinsic dark signal (T-2-weighted MRI), which sometimes misleads clinical diagnosis. Here, for the first time we integrated ultrasmall Fe3O4 nanoparticles (2-3 nm) with an NIR emitting semiconducting polymer for both T-1-and T-2-weighted MRI as well as fluorescence imaging of tumors. Bio-functionalized multi-modality fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (FMNPs) functionalized with folic acid exhibit bright fluorescence and high relaxation (r(1) = 7.008 mM(-1) s(-1), r(2) = 26.788 mM(-1) s(-1), r(2)/r(1) = 3.8). These FMNPs have a small average dynamic size of about 20 nm with low aggregation and long circulation time. In vitro studies revealed that FMNPs can serve as an effective fluorescent probe to achieve targeting images of human A549 lung cancer cells without obvious cytotoxicity. In vivo experimental results show that the FMNPs are able to preferentially accumulate in tumor tissues for specific fluorescence imaging, T-1-and T-2-weighted MRI.

  • 11.
    Zhang, Qiong
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Tian, Xiaohe
    UCL, England.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brommesson, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wu, Jieying
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Zhou, Hongping
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Li, Shengli
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Jiaxiang
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Zhaoqi
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Tian, Yupeng
    Anhui University, Peoples R China; Nanjing University, Peoples R China.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A series of Zn(II) terpyridine complexes with enhanced two-photon-excited fluorescence for in vitro and in vivo bioimaging2015In: Journal of materials chemistry. B, ISSN 2050-750X, E-ISSN 2050-7518, Vol. 3, no 36, p. 7213-7221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is still a challenge to obtain two-photon excited fluorescent bioimaging probes with intense emission, high photo-stability and low cytotoxicity. In the present work, four Zn(II)-coordinated complexes (1-4) constructed from two novel D-A and D-p-A ligands (L-1 and L-2) are investigated both experimentally and theoretically, aiming to explore efficient two-photon probes for bioimaging. Molecular geometry optimization used for theoretical calculations is achieved using the crystallographic data. Notably, the results indicate that complexes 1 and 2 display enhanced two-photon absorption (2PA) cross sections compared to their corresponding D-A ligand (L1). Furthermore, it was found that complex 1 has the advantages of moderate 2PA cross section in the near-infrared region, longer fluorescence lifetime, higher quantum yield, good biocompatibility and enhanced two-photon excited fluorescence. Therefore, complex 1 is evaluated as a bioimaging probe for in vitro imaging of HepG2 cells, in which it is observed under a two-photon scanning microscope that complex 1 exhibits effective co-staining with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and nuclear membrane; as well as for in vivo imaging of zebrafish larva, in which it is observed that complex 1 exhibits specificity in the intestinal system.

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