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  • 1.
    Diarbakerli, Elias
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Savvides, Panayiotis
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wihlborg, Axel
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Abbott, Allan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Bergström, Ingrid
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gerdhem, Paul
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bone health in adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis: a comparison with age- and sex-matched controls2020In: The Bone & Joint Journal, ISSN 2049-4394, E-ISSN 2049-4408, Vol. 102-B, no 2, p. 268-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    Idiopathic scoliosis is the most common spinal deformity in adolescents and children. The aetiology of the disease remains unknown. Previous studies have shown a lower bone mineral density in individuals with idiopathic scoliosis, which may contribute to the causation. The aim of the present study was to compare bone health in adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis with controls.

    Methods

    We included 78 adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis (57 female patients) at a mean age of 13.7 years (8.5 to 19.6) and 52 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (39 female patients) at a mean age of 13.8 years (9.1 to 17.6). Mean skeletal age, estimated according to the Tanner-Whitehouse 3 system (TW3), was 13.4 years (7.4 to 17.8) for those with idiopathic scoliosis, and 13.1 years (7.4 to 16.5) for the controls. Mean Cobb angle for those with idiopathic scoliosis was 29° (SD 11°). All individuals were scanned with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and peripheral quantitative CT (pQCT) of the left radius and tibia to assess bone density. Statistical analyses were performed with independent-samples t-test, the Mann-Whitney U test, and the chi-squared test.

    Results

    Compared with controls, adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis had mean lower DXA values in the left femoral neck (0.94 g/cm2 (SD 0.14) vs 1.00 g/cm2 (SD 0.15)), left total hip (0.94 g/cm2 (SD 0.14) vs 1.01 g/cm2 (SD 0.17)), L1 to L4 (0.99 g/cm2 (SD 0.15) vs 1.06 g/cm2 (SD 0.17)) and distal radius (0.35 g/cm2 (SD 0.07) vs 0.39 g/cm2 (SD 0.08; all p ≤ 0.024), but not in the mid-radius (0.72 g/cm2 vs 0.74 g/cm2; p = 0.198, independent t-test) and total body less head (1,559 g (SD 380) vs 1,649 g (SD 492; p = 0.0.247, independent t-test). Compared with controls, adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis had lower trabecular volume bone mineral density (BMD) on pQCT in the distal radius (184.7 mg/cm3 (SD 40.0) vs 201.7 mg/cm3 (SD 46.8); p = 0.029), but not in other parts of the radius or the tibia (p ≥ 0.062, Mann-Whitney U test).

    Conclusion

    In the present study, idiopathic scoliosis patients seemed to have lower BMD at central skeletal sites and less evident differences at peripheral skeletal sites when compared with controls.

  • 2.
    Kadum, Bakir
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Inngul, C.
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Section of Orthopaedics, Karolinska Institutet, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ihrman, R.
    Department of Orthopaedics,, Ryhov Hospital, Linköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sjoden, G. O.
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences and Department of Orthopaedics, Umeå University, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sayed-Noor, A. S.
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences,, Umeå University, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Higher preoperative sensitivity to pain and pain at rest are associated with worse functional outcome after stemless total shoulder arthroplasty: a prospective cohort study2018In: The Bone & Joint Journal, ISSN 2049-4394, E-ISSN 2049-4408, Vol. 100B, no 4, p. 480-484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    The aims of this study were to investigate any possible relationship between a preoperative sensitivity to pain and the degree of pain at rest and on exertion with postoperative function in patients who underwent stemless total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA).

    Patients and Methods

    In this prospective study, we included 63 patients who underwent stemless TSA and were available for evaluation one year postoperatively. There were 31 women and 32 men; their mean age was 71 years (53 to 89). The pain threshold, which was measured using a Pain Matcher (PM) unit, the degree of pain (visual analogue scale at rest and on exertion, and function using the short version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (QuickDASH), were recorded preoperatively, as well as three and 12 months postoperatively.

    Results

    We found an inverse relationship between both the preoperative PM threshold and pain (VAS) at rest and the 12-month postoperative QuickDASH score (Pearson correlation coefficient (r) ≥ 0.4, p < 0.05). A linear regression analysis showed that the preoperative PM threshold on the affected side and preoperative pain (VAS) at rest were the only factors associated with the QuickDASH score at 12 months.

    Conclusion

    These findings indicate the importance of central sensitization in the restoration of function after TSA. Further studies are required to investigate whether extra analgesia and rehabilitation could influence the outcome in at risk patients.

  • 3.
    Nestorson, Jens
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Ekholm, C.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Orthopaedics Gothenburg University Institute of Clinic al Sciences at Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Etzner, M.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Orthopaedics Varberg Hospital, Varberg, Sweden..
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Hemiarthroplasty for irreparable distal humeral fractures: Medium-term follow-up of 42 patients2015In: The Bone & Joint Journal, ISSN 2049-4394, E-ISSN 2049-4408, Vol. 97B, no 10, p. 1377-1384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report our experience of performing an elbow hemiarthroplasty in the treatment of comminuted distal humeral fractures in the elderly patients. A cohort of 42 patients (three men and 39 women, mean age 72; 56 to 84) were reviewed at a mean of 34.3 months (24 to 61) after surgery. Functional outcome was measured with the Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS) and range of movement. The disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand questionnaire (DASH) was used as a patient rated evaluation. Complications and ulnar nerve function were recorded. Plain radiographs were obtained to assess prosthetic loosening, olecranon wear and heterotopic bone formation. The mean extension deficit was 23.5 degrees (0 degrees to 60 degrees) and mean flexion was 126.8 degrees (90 degrees to 145 degrees) giving a mean arc of 105.5 degrees (60 degrees to 145 degrees). The mean MEPS was 90 (50 to 100) and a mean DASH score of 20 (0 to 63). Four patients had additional surgery for limited range of movement and one for partial instability. One elbow was revised due to loosening, two patients had sensory ulnar nerve symptoms, and radiographic signs of mild olecranon wear was noted in five patients. Elbow hemiarthroplasty for comminuted intra-articular distal humeral fractures produces reliable medium-term results with functional outcome and complication rates, comparable with open reduction and internal fixation and total elbow arthroplasty.

  • 4.
    Perlbach, Rico
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Palm, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Mohaddes, M.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden; Registerctr VGR, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Schilcher, Jörg
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Good implant survival after acetabular revision with extensive impaction bone grafting and uncemented components2020In: The Bone & Joint Journal, ISSN 2049-4394, E-ISSN 2049-4408, Vol. 102B, no 2, p. 198-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims This single-centre observational study aimed to describe the results of extensive bone impaction grafting of the whole acetabular cavity in combination with an uncemented component in acetabular revisions performed in a standardized manner since 1993. Methods Between 1993 and 2013, 370 patients with a median age of 72 years (interquartile range (IQR) 63 to 79 years) underwent acetabular revision surgery. Of these, 229 were more than ten years following surgery and 137 were more than 15 years. All revisions were performed with extensive use of morcellized allograft firmly impacted into the entire acetabular cavity, followed by insertion of an uncemented component with supplementary screw fixation. All types of reoperation were captured using review of radiographs and medical charts, combined with data from the local surgical register and the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register. Results Among patients with possible follow-up of ten and 15 years, 152 and 72 patients remained alive without revision of the acetabular component. The number of deaths was 61 and 50, respectively. Of those who died, six patients in each group had a reoperation performed before death. The number of patients with a reoperation was 22 for those with ten-year follow-up and 21 for those with 15 years of follow-up. The Kaplan-Meier implant survival rate for aseptic loosening among all 370 patients in the cohort was 96.3% (95% confidence interval (CI) 94.1 to 98.5) after ten years and 92.8% (95% CI 89.2 to 96.6) after 15 years. Conclusion Extensive bone impaction grafting combined with uncemented revision components appears to be a reliable method with favourable long-term survival. This technique offers the advantage of bone stock restoration and disputes the long-standing perception that uncemented components require amp;gt; 50% of host bone contact for successful implant survival.

  • 5.
    Schilcher, Jörg
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Palm, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Ivarsson, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Local bisphosphonate reduces migration and formation of radiolucent lines adjacent to cemented acetabular components2017In: The Bone & Joint Journal, ISSN 2049-4394, E-ISSN 2049-4408, Vol. 99B, no 3, p. 317-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Post-operative migration of cemented acetabular components as measured by radiostereometric analysis (RSA) has a strong predictive power for late, aseptic loosening. Also, radiolucent lines predict late loosening. Migration has been reduced by systemic bisphosphonate treatment in randomised trials of hip and knee arthroplasty. Used as a local treatment, a higher local dose of bisphosphonate can be achieved without systemic exposure. We wished to see if this principle could be applied usefully in total hip arthroplasty (THA). Patients and Methods In this randomised placebo-controlled, double-blinded trial with 60 participants, we compressed gauze soaked in bisphosphonate solution (ibandronate) or saline against the acetabular bone bed immediately before cementing the acetabular component. RSA, classification of radiolucent lines, the Harris Hip Score (HHS) and the Western Ontario McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) were carried out at three-, six-, 12-, and 24-month follow-up. Results Migration of the cemented acetabular component relative to the pelvis was reduced by movement almost half in the ibandronate group, when measured as maximum total point or as movement of the femoral head (p = 0.001 and 0.004, respectively). Radiolucent lines after one year were classified as absent, partial or complete, and correlated with treatment (rho 0.37; p = 0.004). Only three of 30 patients in the ibandronate group had complete lines, compared with 13 of 28 in the placebo group (p = 0.002). There were no significant effects on HHS or WOMAC score. Conclusion Considering the power of RSA to predict loosening of cemented acetabular components, and the likelihood that radiolucent lines indicate risk of loosening, these data suggest that local treatment with a bisphosphonate can reduce the risk of late aseptic loosening.

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