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  • 1.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Clinician-Supported Internet-Delivered Psychological Treatment of Tinnitus2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 299-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Internet-delivered psychological treatments for tinnitus distress have existed for more than 15 years, and there are a slowly growing number of studies. The aim of this brief report is to review the evidence and to comment on the future potentials of Internet treatments for tinnitus. Method: Studies were retrieved, and in total 6 controlled studies were included in the review with 9 different comparisons (6 in which the treatment was compared against a control group and 3 in which Internet treatment was compared against group treatment). Moreover, 2 open studies based on clinical samples in regular care were also included in the review. The outcomes for the 2 controlled sets of studies were analyzed using meta-analytic methods. Results: For the 6 studies comparing Internet treatment against a no-treatment control condition, a moderate effect size was found (Hedgess g = 0.58). The 3 studies comparing Internet treatment against face-to-face group treatments showed a small difference of Hedgess g = 0.13. Conclusions: Internet-delivered psychological treatment holds promise as a treatment alternative to other standard forms of treatment delivery, including group treatment. Larger studies are needed as well as ways to blend information technology with regular services.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Internet-Delivered Psychological Treatments for Tinnitus: A Brief Historical Review2022In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 1013-1018Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Internet-delivered psychological treatments were developed more than 20 years ago, and tinnitus was among the first target conditions. The aim of this review article is to describe the history of Internet treatments for tinnitus and to comment on the evidence base. Challenges for future research and implementations will be mentioned. Method: A narrative historical review was conducted. Findings: There are now several studies including controlled trials on Internet interventions based on cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) for tinnitus. Effects in controlled trials are moderate to large with regard to tinnitus annoyance. While the treatment format now exists in four languages, there is a large treatment versus demand gap as very few clients with tinnitus receive ICBT. There is a lack of research on related conditions with the exception of hearing loss. However, there is substantial support for Internet interventions for comorbid conditions such as insomnia and depression but not specifically in association with tinnitus. Conclusions: ICBT is a promising treatment approach for tinnitus and will hopefully increase access to evidence-based treatment to reduce tinnitus distress. More research is needed for related conditions such as hyperacusis and larger trials on tinnitus.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon AS, Denmark; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Preminger, Jill E.
    University of Louisville, KY 40292 USA.
    Internet and Audiology: A Review of the First International Meeting2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 269-270Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this research forum article is to describe the impetus for holding the First International Meeting on Internet and Audiology (October 2014) and to introduce the special research forum that arose from the meeting. Method: The rationale for the First International Meeting on Internet and Audiology is described. This is followed by a short description of the research sections and articles appearing in the special issue. Six articles consider the process of health care delivery over the Internet; this includes health care specific to hearing, tinnitus, and balance. Four articles discuss the development of effective Internet-based treatment programs. Six articles describe and evaluate Internet-based interventions specific to adult hearing aid users. Conclusion: The fledgling field of Internet and audiology is remarkably broad. The Second International Meeting on Internet and Audiology ocurred in September 2015.

  • 4.
    Arlinger, Stig
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nordqvist, Peter
    Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids: Data From a Large Swedish Quality Register Database2017In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 443-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze a database of completed International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA) questionnaires obtained from over 100,000 clients fitted with new hearing aids in Sweden during the period of 2012-2016. Mean IOI-HA total scores were correlated with degree of hearing loss, unilateral versus bilateral fitting, first-time versus return clients, gender, and variation among dispensing clinics. The correlations with expectations, service quality, and technical functioning of the hearing aids were also analyzed. Method: Questionnaires containing the 7 IOI-HA items as well as questions concerning some additional issues were mailed to clients 3-6 months after fitting of new hearing aids. The questionnaires were returned to and analyzed by an independent research institute. Results: More than 100 dispensing clinics nationwide take part in this project. A response rate of 52.6% resulted in 106,631 data sets after excluding incomplete questionnaires. Forty-six percent of the responders were women, and 54% were men. The largest difference in mean score (0.66) was found for the IOI-HA item "use" between return clients and first-time users. Women reported significantly higher (better) scores for the item "impact on others" compared with men. The bilaterally fitted subgroup reported significantly higher scores for all 7 items compared with the unilaterally fitted subgroup. Experienced users produced higher scores on benefit and satisfaction items, whereas first-time users gave higher scores for residual problems. No correlation was found between mean IOI-HA total score and average hearing threshold level (pure-tone average [ PTA]). Mean IOI-HA total scores were found to correlate significantly with perceived service quality of the dispensing center and with the technical functionality of the hearing aids. Conclusions: When comparing mean IOI-HA total scores from different studies or between groups, differences with regard to hearing aid experience, gender, and unilateral versus bilateral fitting have to be considered. No correlation was found between mean IOI-HA total score and degree of hearing loss in terms of PTA. Thus, PTA is not a reliable predictor of benefit and satisfaction of hearing aid provision as represented by the IOI-HA items. Identification of a specific lower fence in PTA for hearing aid candidacy is therefore to be avoided. Large differences were found in mean IOI-HA total scores related to different dispensing centers.

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  • 5.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    et al.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Allen, Peter M.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Baguley, David M.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; Nottingham Biomed Res Ctr, England; Univ Nottingham, England; Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India; Manipal Univ, India.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Long-Term Efficacy of Audiologist-Guided Internet-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Tinnitus2018In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 431-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term outcomes 1 year after undertaking an audiologist-guided Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) intervention for tinnitus. Secondary aims were to identify any predictors of outcome and whether there were any unwanted events related to undertaking iCBT for tinnitus. Method: Participants who had previously undertaken a randomized iCBT efficacy trial for tinnitus were invited to participate. Of the 146 who were initially randomized for the efficacy trial, 104 participants completed the 1-year post-intervention assessment measures. The primary outcome was a change in tinnitus distress as assessed by the Tinnitus Functional Index. Secondary assessment measures were included for insomnia, anxiety, depression, hearing handicap, hyperacusis, cognitive failures, and satisfaction with life. An intention-to-treat analysis using repeated-measures analysis of variance and hierarchical multiple regression was used for statistical analysis. Unwanted effects were categorized according to the unwanted events checklist. Results: Undertaking iCBT for tinnitus led to significant improvements 1 year post-intervention for tinnitus and related difficulties, for example, insomnia, anxiety, depression, hearing handicap, hyperacusis, and life satisfaction. The best predictors of improving tinnitus severity at 1-year post-intervention were greater baseline tinnitus severity scores, reading more of the modules, and higher satisfaction with the intervention. Unwanted events were reported by 11% of the participants and were more likely to be reported by women than men. These events were related to worsening of symptoms, the emergence of new symptoms, negative well-being, and prolongation of treatment. Conclusions: The clinical benefits of audiologist-guided iCBT for tinnitus and tinnitus-related difficulties were sustained 1 year post-intervention. Predictors of outcome indicated that the intervention is applicable to a wide range of participants regardless of their demographic backgrounds. Attempts should be made to minimize unwanted events in subsequent trials.

  • 6.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    et al.
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Fagelson, Marc
    East Tennessee State Univ, TN USA; Vet Affairs Med Ctr, TN USA.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Manipal Univ, India.
    Audiologist-Supported Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Tinnitus in the United States: A Pilot Trial2021In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 717-729Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients often report that living with a condition such as tinnitus can be debilitating, worrying, and frustrating. Efficient ways to foster management strategies for individuals with tinnitus and promoting tinnitus self-efficacy are needed. Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT) for tinnitus shows promise as an evidence-based intervention in Europe, but is not available in the United States. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility of an ICBT intervention for tinnitus in the United States. Method: This study reports the Phase 1 trial intended to support implementation of a larger randomized clinical trial (RCT) comparing ICBT to a weekly monitoring group. As a pilot study, a single-group pretest-posttest design was used to determine outcome potential, recruitment strategy, retention, and adherence rates of ICBT for tinnitus. The primary outcome was a change in tinnitus distress. Secondary outcome measures included measures of anxiety, depression, insomnia, tinnitus cognitions, hearing-related difficulties, and quality of life. Results: Of the 42 screened participants, nine did not meet the inclusion criteria and six withdrew. There were 27 participants who completed the intervention, with a mean age of 55.48 (+/- 9.9) years. Feasibility was established, as a large pretest-posttest effect size of d = 1.6 was found for tinnitus severity. Large pretest-posttest effect sizes were also found for tinnitus cognitions and hearing-related effects, and a medium effect was found for insomnia and quality of life. Treatment adherence varied with a retention rate of 85% (n = 23) at post-intervention assessment and 67% (n = 18) for the follow-up assessment. Conclusions: This pilot study supported the feasibility of ICBT for tinnitus in the United States. Ways of improving intervention retention and recruitment rates need to be explored in future ICBT studies. Protocol refinements that were identified will be implemented prior to further RCTs to investigate the efficacy of ICBT for tinnitus in the United States.

  • 7.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    et al.
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Anglia Ruskin Univ, TX USA.
    Fagelson, Marc
    East Tennessee State Univ, TN USA; Vet Affairs Med Ctr, TN USA.
    Aronson, Elizabeth Parks
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Munoz, Maria F.
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Manipal Univ, India; Audiol India, India.
    Readability Following Cultural and Linguistic Adaptations of an Internet-Based Intervention for Tinnitus for Use in the United States2020In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 97-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: An Internet-based tinnitus intervention for use in the United States could improve the provision of tinnitusrelated services. Although clinical trials of such interventions were completed in Europe, the United Kingdom, and Australia, their suitability for adults with tinnitus in the United States is yet to be established. The aim of this study was to improve the cultural and linguistic suitability, and lower the readability level, of an existing program for tinnitus to ensure its suitability for U.S. English- and Spanish-speaking populations. Method: Guidelines for adaptation were followed and involved four phases: (a) cultural adaptations, as interventions targeted at specific cultures have been shown to improve outcomes; (b) creating Spanish materials to improve access of the materials to the large Spanish-speaking population in the United States; (c) professional review of the materials for acceptability as an intervention tool for a U.S. population; and (d) literacy-level adjustments to make the content accessible to those with lower levels of health literacy skills. Results: Cultural adaptations were made by using word substitutions, changing examples, and modifying the spelling of certain words. The materials were then translated into Spanish and cross-checked. Professional review ensured suitability of the chapters. Literacy-level adjustments ensured all chapters were within the guidelines for readability grade levels below the sixth-grade level. Conclusions: The previously developed tinnitus materials were revised to adhere to best practice guidelines and ensure cultural suitability for adults with tinnitus in the United States. As it is also available in Spanish, members of the large Hispanic community also have access to the intervention in their first language. Further studies should determine whether these changes improve patients self-efficacy, engagement, and motivation to complete the intervention.

  • 8.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    et al.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; Collaborat Initiat Univ Colorado Sch Med & Univ P, CO 80045 USA.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Collaborat Initiat Univ Colorado Sch Med & Univ P, CO 80045 USA; Univ Colorado, CO USA; Univ Colorado Hosp, CO USA; Univ Pretoria, South Africa; Manipal Acad Higher Educ, India.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology. Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Reg Stockholm, Sweden.
    Maidment, David W.
    Loughborough Univ, England.
    Application of the Behavior Change Wheel Within the Context of Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Tinnitus Management2022In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 433-444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Although experiencing tinnitus can lead to many difficulties, these can be reduced by using techniques derived from cognitive behavioral therapy. Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT) has been developed to provide an accessible intervention. The aim of this study was to describe how ICBT can facilitate tinnitus management by identifying the active ingredients of the intervention from the perspective of health behavior change. Method: The ICBT intervention was evaluated using the Behavior Change Wheel in eight steps across the following three stages: (1) understanding the behavior, (2) identifying intervention options, and (3) identifying content and implementation options. Results: Target behaviors identified to reduce tinnitus distress, as well as additional problems associated with tinnitus, included goal setting, an increased understanding of tinnitus, encouraging deep breathing and progressive muscle relaxation, identifying and restructuring unhelpful thoughts, engaging in positive imagery, and reducing avoidance behaviors. ICBT provided the required components for individuals to be physically and psychologically capable of adapting to tinnitus, providing social and environmental opportunities to manage hearing loss through practice and training, and facilitated automatic and reflective motivation. Conclusion: Understanding ICBT in the context of the Behavior Change Wheel has helped identify how its effectiveness can be improved and can be used for future tinnitus intervention planning.

  • 9.
    Brännström, Jonas K
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Dept of clinical science, Section of Logopedics, Phoiatrics and audiology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Ingo, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Månsson, Kristoffer N. T.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Denmark.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Denmark.
    The Process of Developing an Internet-Based Support System for Audiologists and First-Time Hearing Aid Clients2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 320-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In audiologic practice, complementary information sources and access to the clinician between appointments improve information retention and facilitate adjustment behaviors. An Internet-based support system is a novel way to support information sharing and clinician access. Purpose: This research forum article describes the process of developing an Internet-based support system for audiologists and their first-time hearing aid clients. Method: The iterative development process, including revisions by 4 research audiologists and 4 clinical audiologists, is described. The final system is exemplified. Conclusion: An Internet-based support system was successfully developed for audiologic practice.

  • 10.
    Convery, Elizabeth
    et al.
    HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; National Acoustic Laboratories, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Australia.
    Keidser, Gitte
    HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; National Acoustic Laboratories, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Australia.
    Hickson, Louise
    HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Australia.
    Meyer, Carly
    HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Australia.
    The Relationship Between Hearing Loss Self-Management and Hearing Aid Benefit and Satisfaction2019In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 274-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Hearing loss self-management refers to the knowledge and skills people use to manage the effects of hearing loss on all aspects of their daily lives. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between self-reported hearing loss self-management and hearing aid benefit and satisfaction.

    Method: Thirty-seven adults with hearing loss, all of whom were current users of bilateral hearing aids, participated in this observational study. The participants completed self-report inventories probing their hearing loss self-management and hearing aid benefit and satisfaction. Correlation analysis was used to investigate the relationship between individual domains of hearing loss self-management and hearing aid benefit and satisfaction.

    Results: Participants who reported better self-management of the effects of their hearing loss on their emotional well-being and social participation were more likely to report less aided listening difficulty in noisy and reverberant environments and greater satisfaction with the effect of their hearing aids on their self-image. Participants who reported better self-management in the areas of adhering to treatment, participating in shared decision making, accessing services and resources, attending appointments, and monitoring for changes in their hearing and functional status were more likely to report greater satisfaction with the sound quality and performance of their hearing aids.

    Conclusion: Study findings highlight the potential for using information about a patient's hearing loss self-management in different domains as part of clinical decision making and management planning.

  • 11.
    Essery, Rosie
    et al.
    University of Southampton, England.
    Kirby, Sarah
    University of Southampton, England.
    Geraghty, Adam W. A.
    University of Southampton, England.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Carlbring, Per
    University of Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bronstein, Adolfo
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Little, Paul
    University of Southampton, England.
    Yardley, Lucy
    University of Southampton, England.
    The Development of Balance Retraining: An Online Intervention for Dizziness in Adults Aged 50 Years and Older2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 276-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This article outlines the rationale and development process for an online intervention based on vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT). The intervention aims to assist adults aged 50 years and older to self-manage and reduce dizziness symptoms. Method: The intervention was developed according to the person-based approach to digital intervention design focused on accommodating perspectives of target users. A prototype version of the intervention was provided to 18 adults (11 women, 7 men) aged 50 years and older with dizziness. These adults were invited to use the intervention over a 6-week period and, during this time, took part in a think-aloud session. This session sought to understand users perceptions of how acceptable, engaging, and easy to use they found the online intervention. Results: Users were extremely positive regarding how easy to navigate, visually appealing, and informative they found the intervention. Think-aloud sessions provided valuable data for informing small amendments to further enhance acceptability of the intervention for target users. Conclusions: Informed by these development-phase data, a finalized version of the intervention is now being investigated in a primary care-based randomized controlled trial. Results should provide an understanding of whether VRT can be effectively-especially, cost-effectively-delivered via an online intervention to adults aged 50 years and older.

  • 12.
    Frumkin, Madelyn R.
    et al.
    Washington Univ St Louis, MO 63130 USA.
    Kallogjeri, Dorina
    Washington Univ St Louis, MO USA.
    Piccirillo, Jay F.
    Washington Univ St Louis, MO USA.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Manipal Univ, India.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Rodebaugh, Thomas L.
    Washington Univ St Louis, MO 63130 USA.
    Development and Preliminary Evaluation of the Tinnitus Severity Short Form2021In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 404-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Tinnitus, or the perception of sounds that occur without an external sound source, is a prevalent condition worldwide. For a subset of adults, tinnitus causes significant distress and impairment. Several patient-reported outcome measures have been developed to assess severity of tinnitus distress. However, at present, the field lacks a brief measure that is sensitive to treatment change. The purpose of the current study was to develop and preliminarily validate a brief questionnaire for tinnitus severity from two existing measures of tinnitus-related distress, the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) and Tinnitus Functional Index (TFI). Method: Using data from nine study samples in the United States and United Kingdom, we conducted exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to identify a short measure with good psychometric properties. We also assessed sensitivity to treatment-related change by examining associations with change in the TFI and THI. Finally, we conducted a confirmatory factor analysis of the final short questionnaire in a new sample of adults seeking treatment for tinnitus-related distress. Results: We identified 10 items from the THI and TFI that exhibited limited loadings on secondary factors. The resulting Tinnitus Severity Short Form achieved good to excellent fit, including in a unique sample of individuals seeking online treatment for tinnitus, and appeared sensitive to treatment-related change. Conclusions: The Tinnitus Severity Short Form developed in the current study may be a useful tool for the assessment of subjective severity and distress associated with tinnitus, especially when patient burden is a concern. Further research is necessary to fully validate the questionnaire for the assessment of treatment-related change.

  • 13.
    Gutenberg, Johanna
    et al.
    Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Katrakazas, Panagiotis
    Natl Tech Univ Athens, Greece.
    Trenkova, Lyubov
    Pazardzhik Reg Adm, Bulgaria.
    Murdin, Louisa
    Guys and St Thomas NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Brdaric, Dario
    Inst Publ Hlth Osijek Baranya Cty, Croatia.
    Koloutsou, Nina
    Univ London, England.
    Ploumidou, Katherine
    Athens Med Grp, Greece.
    Pontoppidan, Niels Henrik
    Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon Med, Denmark.
    Big Data for Sound Policies: Toward Evidence-Informed Hearing Health Policies2018In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 493-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The scarcity of health care resources calls for their rational allocation, including within hearing health care. Policies define the course of action to reach specific goals such as optimal hearing health. The process of policy making can be divided into 4 steps: (a) problem identification and issue recognition, (b) policy formulation, (c) policy implementation, and (d) policy evaluation. Data and evidence, especially Big Data, can inform each of the steps of this process. Big Data can inform the macrolevel (policies that determine the general goals and actions), mesolevel (specific services and guidelines in organizations), and microlevel (clinical care) of hearing health care services. The research project EVOTION applies Big Data collection and analysis to form an evidence base for future hearing health care policies. Method: The EVOTION research project collects heterogeneous data both from retrospective and prospective cohorts (clinical validation) of people with hearing impairment. Retrospective data from clinical repositories in the United Kingdom and Denmark will be combined. As part of a clinical validation, over 1,000 people with hearing impairment will receive smart EVOTION hearing aids and a mobile phone application from clinics located in the United Kingdom and Greece. These clients will also complete a battery of assessments, and a subsample will also receive a smartwatch including biosensors. Big Data analytics will identify associations between client characteristics, context, and hearing aid outcomes. Results: The evidence EVOTION will generate is relevant especially for the first 2 steps of the policy-making process, namely, problem identification and issue recognition, as well as policy formulation. EVOTION will inform microlevel, mesolevel, and macrolevel of hearing health care services through evidence-informed policies, clinical guidelines, and clinical care. Conclusion: In the future, Big Data can inform all steps of the hearing health policy-making process and all levels of hearing health care services.

  • 14.
    Hickson, Louise
    et al.
    University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Wong, Lena
    University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam.
    Evidence-based practice in audiology: rehabilitation options for adults with hearing impairment2013In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 22, p. 329-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    Three questions are addressed: 1) What is Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) and why is it important for adults with hearing impairment? 2) What is the evidence about intervention options for adults who fail a hearing screening and are identified with hearing impairment? 3) What intervention options do adults choose when identified with hearing impairment for the first time?

    METHODS:

    The five steps of the EBP process are discussed in relation to a clinical question about whether hearing aids and communication programs reduce activity limitations and participation restrictions compared to no treatment for adults who fail a hearing screening and are identified with hearing impairment.

    RESULTS:

    Systematic reviews of the evidence indicate that both hearing aids and communication programs reduce activity limitations and participation restrictions for this population and are therefore appropriate options. A study is then described in which these options were presented to 153 clients identified with hearing impairment for the first time: 43% chose hearing aids, 18% chose communication programs and the remaining 39% chose not to take any action.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    EBP supports the offer of intervention options to adults who fail a hearing screening and are identified with hearing impairment.

  • 15.
    Keidser, Gitte
    et al.
    National Acoustic Laboratories, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Hearing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Matthews, Nicole
    Department of Media, Music, Communication and Cultural Studies, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
    Convery, Elizabeth
    National Acoustic Laboratories, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Hearing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    A Qualitative Examination of User Perceptions of User-Driven and App-Controlled Hearing Technologies2019In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 993-1005Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Purpose

    The aim of this study was to examine how hearing aid candidates perceive user-driven and app-controlled hearing aids and the effect these concepts have on traditional hearing health care delivery.

    Method

    Eleven adults (3 women, 8 men), recruited among 60 participants who had completed a research study evaluating an app-controlled, self-fitting hearing aid for 12 weeks, participated in a semistructured interview. Participants were over 55 years of age and had varied experience with hearing aids and smartphones. A template analysis was applied to data.

    Results

    Five themes emerged from the interviews: (a) prerequisites to the successful implementation of user-driven and app-controlled technologies, (b) benefits and advantages of user-driven and app-controlled technologies, (c) barriers to the acceptance and use of user-driven and app-controlled technologies, (d) beliefs that age is a significant factor in how well people will adopt new technology, and (e) consequences that flow from the adoption of user-driven and app-controlled technologies. Specifically, suggested benefits of the technology included fostering empowerment and providing cheaper and more discrete options, while challenges included lack of technological self-efficacy among older adults. Training and support were emphasized as necessary for successful adaptation and were suggested to be a focus of audiologic services in the future.

    Conclusion

    User perceptions of user-driven and app-controlled hearing technologies challenge the audiologic profession to provide adequate support and training for use of the technology and manufacturers to make the technology more accessible to older people. 

  • 16.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Sundewall Thoren, Elisabet
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Readability of Internet Information on Hearing: Systematic Literature Review2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 284-288Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This systematic literature review asks the following question: "What is the readability of Internet information on hearing that people with hearing impairment and their significant others can access in the context of their hearing care?" Method: Searches were completed in three databases: CINAHL, PubMed, and Scopus. Seventy-eight records were identified and systematically screened for eligibility: 8 records were included that contained data on the readability of Internet information on hearing that people with hearing impairment and their significant others can access in the context of their hearing care. Results: Records reported mean readability levels from 9 to over 14. In other words, people with hearing impairment and their significant others need 9 to 14 years of education to read and understand Internet information on hearing that they access in the context of their hearing care. Conclusion: The poor readability of Internet information on hearing has been well documented; it is time to focus on valid and sustainable initiatives that address this problem.

  • 17.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    About Cognitive Outcome Measures at Ecological Signal-to-Noise Ratios and Cognitive-Driven Hearing Aid Signal Processing2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 121-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to discuss 2 questions concerning how hearing aids interact with hearing and cognition: Can signal processing in hearing aids improve memory? Can attention be used for top-down control of hearing aids? Method: Memory recall of sentences, presented at 95% correct speech recognition, was assessed with and without binary mask noise reduction. A short literature review was performed on recent findings on new brain-imaging techniques showing potential for hearing aid control. Conclusions: Two experiments indicate that it is possible to show improved memory with an experimental noise reduction algorithm at ecological signal-to-noise ratios and that it is possible to replicate these findings in a new language. The literature indicates that attention-controlled hearing aids may be developed in the future.

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  • 18.
    Malmberg, Milijana
    et al.
    Boras Hospital, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Kahari, Kim
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jansson, Gunilla
    Boras Hospital, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Implementing Internet-Based Aural Rehabilitation in a General Clinical Practice2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 325-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to share the lessons that were learned about the process of implementing an Internet-based, randomized controlled trial (RCT) in general clinical practice (GCP) and to address some of the advantages of using the Internet as a tool to implement a RCT in GCP. The RCT implemented focused on investigating Internet-based aural rehabilitation (AR) in addition to hearing aid (HA)-fitting supplemented with telephone support, and it was applied in a clinical setting. The results of this RCT and the questionnaires chosen will be presented in an article elsewhere. Procedure: Here, the procedure of the implemented trial is presented, and the implementation challenges are presented and discussed. Specifically, we describe the trial research question, recruitment strategy, patient eligibility criteria, the questionnaires, clinician participation, funding and time (for the clinicians), and risks and benefits (for the participants). Discussion: The trial implementation showed that AR in addition to HA-fitting can be carried out in GCP using the Internet. Using an Internet-based RCT overcomes some of the challenges of implementing a trial in GCP.

  • 19.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    et al.
    Lamar Univ, TX 77705 USA; Lamar Univ, TX 77705 USA; Univ Pretoria, South Africa; Manipal Acad Higher Educ, India.
    Brazelton, Alicia
    Univ Houston, TX USA.
    Rodrigo, Hansapani
    Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, TX USA.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    Lamar Univ, TX 77705 USA; Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Fagelson, Marc A.
    East Tennessee State Univ, TN USA; Vet Affairs Med Ctr, TN USA.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Trivedi, Meghana V
    Univ Houston, TX USA.
    Medication Use Reported by Individuals With Tinnitus Who Are Seeking Internet-Based Psychological Interventions2021In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 1088-1095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study examined medication use by individuals with tinnitus who were seeking help for their tinnitus by means of a psychological intervention. Method: This study used a cross-sectional survey design and included individuals with tinnitus enrolled in an Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy trial (n = 439). Study participants provided demographic details, completed various structured questionnaires and provided details about the medications used. The self-reported medications were classified using the United States Phamiacopeial Medicare Model Guidelines v7.0. Results: Current medication use was reported by 67% (n = 293) of the study participants. Those currently using medication were older; had consulted their primary care physician, had greater tinnitus severity, depression, anxiety, and insomnia when compared with those not reporting any current medication use. The top 10 medication used included cardiovascular agents (n = 162; 55.3%), antidepressants (n = 80; 27.3%), electrolytes/minerals/metals/vitamins (n = 70; 23.9%), respiratory tract/pulmonary agents (n = 62; 21.2%), anxiolytics (n = 59; 20.1%), hormonal agents/stimulant/replacement/modifying (thyroid; n = 45; 15.4%), gastrointestinal agents (n = 43; 14.7%), analgesics (n = 33; 11.3%), blood glucose regulators (n = 32; 10.9%), and anticonvulsants (n = 26; 8.87%). Some associations between type of medication used and demographic or tinnitus-related variables were noted especially for the cardiovascular agents, electrolytes/minerals/metals/vitamins, and anxiolytics. Conclusions: This exploratory study indicated a large percentage of patients using medication and a range of medications. Further studies are required to assess the effects of such medications on the tinnitus percept and concurrent medication moderate treatment effects.

  • 20.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    et al.
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Sch Allied Hlth Sci, India.
    Vlaescu, George
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Varadaraj, Srinivas
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Aronson, Elizabeth Parks
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Fagelson, Marc A.
    East Tennessee State Univ, TN USA; Vet Affairs Med Ctr, TN USA.
    Munoz, Maria F.
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Features, Functionality, and Acceptability of Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Tinnitus in the United States2020In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 476-490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Although tinnitus is one of the most commonly reported symptoms in the general population, patients with bothersome tinnitus are challenged by issues related to accessibility of care and intervention options that lack strong evidence to support their use. Therefore, creative ways of delivering evidence-based interventions are necessary. Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT) demonstrates potential as a means of delivering this support but is not currently available in the United States. This article discusses the adaptation of an ICBT intervention, originally used in Sweden, Germany, and the United Kingdom, for delivery in the United States. The aim of this study was to (a) modify the web platform's features to suit a U.S. population, (b) adapt its functionality to comply with regulatory aspects, and (c) evaluate the credibility and acceptability of the ICBT intervention from the perspective of health care professionals and patients with bothersome tinnitus.

    Materials/Method

    Initially, the iTerapi ePlatform developed in Sweden was adopted for use in the United States. Functional adaptations followed to ensure that the platform's functional and security features complied with both institutional and governmental regulations and that it was suitable for a U.S. population. Following these adaptations, credibility and acceptance of the materials were evaluated by both health care professionals (n = 11) and patients with bothersome tinnitus (n = 8).

    Results

    Software safety and compliance regulatory assessments were met. Health care professionals and patients reported favorable acceptance and satisfaction ratings regarding the content, suitability, presentation, usability, and exercises provided in the ICBT platform. Modifications to the features and functionality of the platform were made according to user feedback.

    Conclusions

    Ensuring that the ePlatform employed the appropriate features and functionalities for the intended population was essential to developing the Internet-based interventions. The favorable user evaluations indicated that the intervention materials were appropriate for the tinnitus population in the United States.

  • 21.
    Molander, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Weineland, Sandra
    Linköping University.
    Bergwall, Kajsa
    Linköping University.
    Buck, Sonia
    Linköping University.
    Hansson-Malmlof, Johan
    Linköping University.
    Lantz, Henning
    Linköping University.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Internet-Based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Psychological Distress Experienced by People With Hearing Problems: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 307-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Psychological distress and psychiatric symptoms are prevalent among people with hearing loss or other audiological conditions, but psychological interventions for these groups are rare. This article describes the study protocol for a randomized controlled trial for evaluating the effect of a psychological treatment delivered over the Internet for individuals with hearing problems and concurrent psychological distress. Method: Participants who are significantly distressed will be randomized to either an 8-week Internet-delivered acceptance-based cognitive behavioral therapy (i.e., acceptance and commitment therapy [ACT]), or wait-list control. We aim to include measures of distress associated with hearing difficulties, anxiety, and depression. In addition, we aim to measure acceptance associated with hearing difficulties as well as quality of life. Conclusion: The results of the trial may further our understanding of how to best treat people who present problems with both psychological distress and hearing in using the Internet.

  • 22.
    Nielsen, Annette Cleveland
    et al.
    Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Rotger-Griful, Sergi
    Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Kanstrup, Anne Marie
    Aalborg Univ, Denmark.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon Med, Denmark.
    User-Innovated eHealth Solutions for Service Delivery to Older Persons With Hearing Impairment2018In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 403-416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The successful design and innovation of eHealth solutions directly involve end users in the process to seek a better understanding of their needs. This article presents user-innovated eHealth solutions targeting older persons with hearing impairment. Our research question was: What are the key users needs, expectations, and visions within future hearing rehabilitation service delivery? Method: We applied a participatory design approach to facilitate the design of future eHealth solutions via focus groups. We involved older persons with hearing impairment (n = 36), significant others (n = 10), and audiologists (n = 8) following 2 methods: (a) human-centered design for interactive systems and (b) user innovation management. Through 3 rounds of focus groups, we facilitated a process progressing from insights and visions for requirements phase 1), to app such as paper version wireframes (Phase 2), and to digital prototypes envisioning future eHealth solutions (Phase 3). Each focus group was video-recorded and photographed, resulting in a rich data set that was analyzed through inductive thematic analysis. Results: The results are presented via (a) a storyboard envisioning future client journeys, (b) 3 key themes for future eHealth solutions, (c) 4 levels of interest and willingness to invest time and effort in digital solutions, and (d) 2 technical savviness types and their different preferences for rehabilitation strategies. Conclusions: Future eHealth solutions must offer personalized rehabilitation strategies that are appropriate for every person with hearing impairment and their level of technical savviness. Thus, a central requirement is anchoring of digital support in the clients everyday life situations by facilitating easy access to personalized information, communication, and leaning milieus. Moreover, the participants visions for eHealth solutions call for providing both traditional analogue and digital services.

  • 23.
    Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen M.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Toronto, Canada.
    Cognitive Decline and Hearing Health Care for Older Adults2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 108-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to consider the implications of age-related cognitive decline for hearing health care. Method: Recent research and current thinking about age-related declines in cognition and the links between auditory and cognitive aging are reviewed briefly. Implications of this research for improving prevention, assessment, and intervention in audiologic practice and for enhancing interprofessional teamwork are highlighted. Conclusions: Given the important connection between auditory and cognitive aging and given the high prevalence of both hearing and cognitive impairments in the oldest older adults, health care services could be improved by taking into account how both the ear and the brain change over the life span. By incorporating cognitive factors into audiologic prevention, assessment, and intervention, hearing health care can contribute to better hearing and communication as well as to healthy aging.

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  • 24.
    Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen M
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Toronto, Canada.
    Forum on the Brain and Hearing Aids2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 112-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to introduce and provide an overview of the 3 articles presented in the invited forum "The Brain and Hearing Aids." Method: The main ideas of the articles presented by the 3 panelists are identified, and a commentary is provided to synthesize the ideas. Conclusions: Benefits from hearing aids and auditory training entail higher-level cortical and cognitive processing involved in categorizing and remembering sound. New approaches to predicting, designing, and evaluating technological and behavioral interventions will need to consider the brain and not just the ears of listeners.

  • 25.
    Pienkowski, Martin
    et al.
    Salus University, Elkins Park, PA, USA.
    Tyler, Richard S
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Roncancio, Eveling Rojas
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Jun, Hyung Jin
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Brozoski, Tom
    Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, USA.
    Dauman, Nicolas
    University of Poitiers, France.
    Coelho, Claudia Barros
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Keiner, Andrew J
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Cacace, Anthony T
    Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA.
    Martin, Nora
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Moore, Brian C J
    University of Cambridge, England.
    A review of hyperacusis and future directions: part II. Measurement, mechanisms, and treatment.2014In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 420-436Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Hyperacusis can be extremely debilitating, and at present, there is no cure. In this detailed review of the field, we consolidate present knowledge in the hope of facilitating future research.

    METHOD: We review and reference the literature on hyperacusis and related areas. This is the 2nd of a 2-part review.

    RESULTS: Hyperacusis encompasses a wide range of reactions to sounds, which can be grouped into the categories of excessive loudness, annoyance, fear, and pain. Reasonable approaches to assessing the different forms of hyperacusis are emerging, including brain-imaging studies. Researchers are only beginning to understand the many mechanisms at play, and valid animal models are still evolving. There are many counseling and sound-therapy approaches that some patients find helpful, but well-controlled studies are needed to measure their long-term efficacy and to test new approaches.

    CONCLUSIONS: Hyperacusis can make life difficult in this increasingly noisy world, forcing sufferers to dramatically alter their work and social habits. We believe this is an opportune time to explore approaches to better understand and treat hyperacusis.

  • 26.
    Preminger, Jill E.
    et al.
    Univ Louisville, KY 40292 USA.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon Med, Denmark.
    Saunders, Gabrielle H.
    Natl Ctr Rehabilitat Auditory Res, OR USA; Eriksholm Res Ctr, Denmark.
    Hughes, Michelle L.
    Univ Nebraska, NE 68583 USA.
    Internet and Audiology: A Review of the Third International Meeting2018In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 373-375Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In this introduction, the four members of the scientific committee for the Third International Meeting on Internet and Audiology describe the meeting that took place at the University of Louisville on July 27-28, 2017. Method: This special issue, with a decidedly clinical focus, includes 14 articles that arose from presentations given at the Third International Meeting on Internet and Audiology. All touch upon the theme of innovation as it pertains to teleaudiology and mobile health (mHealth), application of Big Data to audiology, and ethics of internet and telemedicine. Conclusion: Innovations in teleaudiology, mHealth, and Internet-based audiology are developing at a rapid pace and thus research in the field must continue. We invite readers to the next International Meeting on Internet and Audiology that will take place in Southampton, England, June 17-18, 2019.

  • 27.
    Pyykko, Ilmari
    et al.
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX 77705 USA; Audiol India, India; Manipal University, India.
    Kentala, Erna
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Levo, Hilla
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Juhola, Martti
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Internet-Based Self-Help for Menieres Disease: Details and Outcome of a Single-Group Open Trial2017In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 496-506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In this article, we present the details and the pilot outcome of an Internet-based self-help program for Menieres disease (MD).amp; para;amp; para;Method: The Norton-Kaplan model is applied to construct a strategic, person-focused approach in the enablement process. The program assesses the disorder profile and diagnosis. In the therapeutic component of the program, the participant defines vision and time frame, inspects confounding factors, determines goals, establishes a strategy, and starts to work on the important problems caused by the disorder. The program works interactively, utilizes collaboration with significant others, and enhances positive thinking. Participants took part in an Internet-based self-help program. Data were collected interactively using open-ended and structured questionnaires on various disease-specific and general health aspects. The pilot outcome of 41 patients with MD was evaluated.amp; para;amp; para;Results: The analysis of the pilot data showed statistically significant improvement in their general health-related quality of life (p amp;lt; .001). Also, the outcome of the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (Cann et al., 2010) showed small to moderate change as a result of the intervention.amp; para;amp; para;Conclusions: The Internet-based self-help program can be helpful in the rehabilitation of patients with MD to supplement medical therapy.

  • 28.
    Ratanjee-Vanmali, Husmita
    et al.
    Univ Pretoria, South Africa.
    Swanepoel, De Wet
    Univ Pretoria, South Africa; Univ Western Australia, Australia; Ear Sci Inst Australia, Australia.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon Med AS, Denmark.
    Digital Proficiency Is Not a Significant Barrier for Taking Up Hearing Services With a Hybrid Online and Face-to-Face Model2020In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 785-808Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of self-perceived digital proficiency on the uptake of hearing services through a hybrid online and face-to-face hearing health care model. Method: Adults were recruited via online methods to complete an online hearing screening test within the greater Durban area in South Africa. On submission of contact details after failing the screening, contact was made via telephone to assess readiness for further hearing care. If motivated and willing to continue, a face-to-face appointment for diagnostic hearing testing was confirmed, at which time an e-mail with an online mobile device and computer proficiency survey was sent. Hearing services were offered using combined online and face-to-face methods. Results: Within 2 years (June 2017 to June 2019), 1,259 people from the target location submitted their details for the clinic audiologist to contact, of whom 931 participants (73.95%) failed the screening test. Of these participants, 5.69% (53/931, 57.41 % men) attended a face-to-face diagnostic hearing evaluation. Mobile device and computer proficiency scores were not a predictor of acquiring hearing services. Age was the only significant predictor (p = .018) for those continuing with hearing care. Patients who continued with hearing care by acquiring hearing aids and support services were older (M = 73.63 years, SD = 11.62) and on average aware of their hearing loss for a longer time (M = 14.71 years, SD = 15.77), as compared to those who discontinued hearing health care who were younger (M = 59.21 years, SD = 14.42) and on average aware of their hearing loss for a shorter time (M = 6.37 years, SD = 9.26). Conclusions: Digital proficiency is not a predictor for acquiring hearing services through a hybrid online and face-to-face hearing care model. Hybrid services could allow professionals to assist patients in a combination of face-to-face and online services tailored to meet individual needs, including convenience and personalized care.

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  • 29.
    Rodrigo, Hansapani
    et al.
    Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, TX 78539 USA; Lamar Univ, TX 77705 USA; Univ Pretoria, South Africa.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    Lamar Univ, TX 77705 USA; Univ Pretoria, South Africa; Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Lamar Univ, TX 77705 USA; Univ Pretoria, South Africa; Univ Colorado, CO USA; Univ Colorado Hosp, CO USA; Univ Pretoria, South Africa; Dept Speech & Hearing, India.
    Predicting the Outcomes of Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Tinnitus : Applications of Artificial Neural Network and Support Vector Machine2022In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 1167-1177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT) has been found to be effective for tinnitus management, although there is limited understanding about who will benefit the most from ICBT. Traditional statistical models have largely failed to identify the nonlinear associations and hence find strong predic-tors of success with ICBT. This study aimed at examining the use of an artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM) to identify variables associated with treatment success in ICBT for tinnitus.Method: The study involved a secondary analysis of data from 228 individuals who had completed ICBT in previous intervention studies. A 13-point reduction in Tinnitus Functional Index (TFI) was defined as a successful outcome. There were 33 predictor variables, including demographic, tinnitus, hearing-related and treatment-related variables, and clinical factors (anxiety, depression, insom-nia, hyperacusis, hearing disability, cognitive function, and life satisfaction). Pre-dictive models using ANN and SVM were developed and evaluated for classifi-cation accuracy. SHapley Additive exPlanations (SHAP) analysis was used to identify the relative predictor variable importance using the best predictive model for a successful treatment outcome.Results: The best predictive model was achieved with the ANN with an average area under the receiver operating characteristic value of 0.73 +/- 0.03. The SHAP analysis revealed that having a higher education level and a greater baseline tin-nitus severity were the most critical factors that influence treatment outcome positively.Conclusions: Predictive models such as ANN and SVM help predict ICBT treat-ment outcomes and identify predictors of outcome. However, further work is needed to examine predictors that were not considered in this study as well as to improve the predictive power of these models.Supplemental Material: https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.21266487

  • 30.
    Schonborn, Danielle
    et al.
    Univ Pretoria, South Africa.
    Asmail, Faheema Mahomed
    Univ Pretoria, South Africa.
    De Sousa, Karina C.
    Univ Pretoria, South Africa.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon Med, Denmark.
    Moore, David R.
    Cincinnati Childrens Hosp Med Ctr, OH 45229 USA; Univ Cincinnati, OH USA; Univ Manchester, England.
    Smits, Cas
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Swanepoel, De Wet
    Univ Pretoria, South Africa; Ear Sci Inst Australia, Australia.
    Characteristics and Help-Seeking Behavior of People Failing a Smart Device Self-Test for Hearing2020In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 365-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study investigated user characteristics, help-seeking behavior, and follow-up actions of people who failed an app-based digits-in-noise hearing screening test, considering their stage of change. Method: Test and user characteristics of 3,092 listeners who failed the test were retrospectively analyzed. A posttest survey determining follow-up (verb) actions was sent to listeners who failed the test (n = 1,007), of which 59 responded. Results: The majority of listeners were in the precontemplation stage (75.5%). Age and stage of change were significant (p < .05) predictors of the digits-in-noise speech recognition threshold (DIN SRT). Listeners in the precontemplation stage were significantly younger than in other stages (p < .05). Posttest survey response rate was low (5.9%). Of those, most (82.4%) did not think they had a hearing loss. Only 13.6% followed up with an audiologist. Conclusion: Older people presented with poorer DIN SRTs and were typically in a more advanced stage of change. The majority of those who did not follow up after failing the screening test did not believe they had a hearing loss. A combination of factors, including poor DIN SRT, older age, and a more advanced stage of change inclined participants to follow up with audiological care.

  • 31.
    Sundewall Thoren, Elisabet
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Öberg, Marie
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Internet Interventions for Hearing Loss2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 316-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of the two studies presented in this research forum article was to develop audiological rehabilitation programs for experienced hearing aid users and evaluate them in online versions. In this research forum article, the differences between the two studies are discussed. Method: Two randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were performed evaluating the efficacy of online rehabilitation, including professional guidance by an audiologist. In each RCT, the effects of the online programs were compared with the effects measured in a control group. Results: The results from the first RCT showed a significant increase in activity and participation for both groups with participants in the intervention group improving more than those in the control group. At the 6-month follow-up, after the study, the significant increase was maintained; however, amounts of increase in the two groups were no longer significantly different. The results from the second RCT showed significant increase in activity and participation for the intervention group, although the control group did not improve. Conclusions: The results from the RCTs provide evidence that the Internet can be used to deliver rehabilitation to hearing-aid users and that their problems are reduced by the intervention; however, the content of the online rehabilitation program requires further investigation.

  • 32.
    Thodi, Chryssola
    et al.
    European University Cyprus, Nicosia.
    Parazzini, M.
    Istituto di Ingegneria Biomedica, Milano, Italy.
    Kramer, Sophia
    VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Davis, Adrian
    Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janssen, Thomas
    Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Germany.
    Smith, Pauline
    Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.
    Stevens, Dye
    Cardiff University, Wales, UK.
    Pronk, Marieke
    VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Anteunis, L. I.
    University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands .
    Schirkonyer, Volker
    Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Germany.
    Grandori, Ferdinando
    Istituto di Ingegneria Biomedica, Milano, Italy.
    Adult Hearing Screening: Follow-Up and Outcomes2013In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 22, p. 183-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To screen hearing and evaluate outcomes in community-dwelling older adults.

    METHOD:

    Three thousand and twenty-five adults responded to an invitation to be screened by questionnaire, otoscopy, and pure-tone audiometry. Pure-tone average (PTA) >35 dB HL in the worse ear, unilateral hearing loss, or otoscopic findings were the criteria for referral for services. A questionnaire related to compliance with referral recommendations was completed by telephone interview for 160 randomly selected participants after 1-2 years from referral.

    RESULTS:

    The referral rate for audiologic/hearing aid evaluation was 46%, and referral for cerumen removal/medical evaluation was 17%. Of the people referred for audiologic/hearing aid evaluation, 18% tried a hearing aid; 2 years later, 11% were using a hearing aid. Screening recommendations affected participants' decision to seek help. Study participants stated that the screening was helpful, it should be offered to everybody, and they would participate in future screenings.

    CONCLUSION:

    Although adult hearing screening offered timely identification of hearing loss for adults seeking help, follow-up with hearing aid treatment was low.

  • 33.
    Tyler, Richard S
    et al.
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Pienkowski, Martin
    Salus University, Elkins Park, PA, USA.
    Roncancio, Eveling Rojas
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Jun, Hyung Jin
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Brozoski, Tom
    Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, USA.
    Dauman, Nicolas
    University of Poitiers, France.
    Barros Coelho, Claudia
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Keiner, Andrew J
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Cacace, Anthony T
    Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA.
    Martin, Nora
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Moore, Brian C J
    University of Cambridge, England.
    A review of hyperacusis and future directions: part I. Definitions and manifestations.2014In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 402-19Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Hyperacusis can be extremely debilitating, and at present, there is no cure. We provide an overview of the field, and possible related areas, in the hope of facilitating future research.

    METHOD: We review and reference literature on hyperacusis and related areas. We have divided the review into 2 articles. In Part I, we discuss definitions, epidemiology, different etiologies and subgroups, and how hyperacusis affects people. In Part II, we review measurements, models, mechanisms, and treatments, and we finish with some suggestions for further research.

    RESULTS: Hyperacusis encompasses a wide range of reactions to sound, which can be grouped into the categories of excessive loudness, annoyance, fear, and pain. Many different causes have been proposed, and it will be important to appreciate and quantify different subgroups. Reasonable approaches to assessing the different forms of hyperacusis are emerging, including psychoacoustical measures, questionnaires, and brain imaging.

    CONCLUSIONS: Hyperacusis can make life difficult for many, forcing sufferers to dramatically alter their work and social habits. We believe this is an opportune time to explore approaches to better understand and treat hyperacusis.

  • 34.
    Vlaescu, George
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Carlbring, Per
    University of Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    An E-Platform for Rehabilitation of Persons With Hearing Problems2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 271-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this research forum article was to describe a feasible web-based solution for improving the quality of life of persons with hearing problems, such as hearing loss or tinnitus. The online platform was developed at the Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning at Linkoping University, Sweden, and has been running for a number of years and used in numerous studies and treatments. Method: The security aspects of the platform as well as the process flow for running a study or treatment are described, focusing primarily on the technical and practical considerations. Also presented are the design characteristics and the main features and functions available in the platform. Results: We point out the many advantages of running Internet-assisted intervention treatments, the challenges that we have faced, and some intended developments. Many of our research colleagues, both from Sweden and other countries, have already implemented or intend to implement their own studies on this platform. Conclusions: Audiological rehabilitation can be delivered via the Internet using a stable online platform. Security and usability are important factors to have in mind for the design as well as adaptability to the patients. A next development step is to implement and test blended treatments using video conferencing inside the platform.

  • 35.
    Weineland, Sandra
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ingo, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Molander, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nordqvist, Peter
    Horselskadades Riksforbund, Sweden.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Bridging the Gap Between Hearing Screening and Successful Rehabilitation: Research Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial of Motivational Interviewing via Internet2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 302-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Studies point to low help-seeking after a failed hearing screening. This research forum article presents the research protocol for a randomized controlled trial of motivational interviewing via the Internet to promote help-seeking in people who have failed an online hearing screening. Method: Adults who fail a Swedish online hearing screening, including a speech-in-noise recognition test, will be randomized to either an intervention group (participating in motivational interviewing) or an active control group (reading a book on history of hearing aids). Both of the conditions will be delivered via the Internet. The primary outcome is experience with seeking health care and using hearing aids 9 months after the intervention. Secondary outcomes are changes in before and after measures of self-reported hearing difficulties, anxiety, depression, and quality of life. Stages of change and self-efficacy in hearing help-seeking are measured immediately after intervention and at a 9-month follow-up for the purpose of mediation analysis. Results: The results of this randomized controlled trial may help bridge the gap between hearing screening and successful hearing rehabilitation. Conclusion: Although no large instantaneous benefits are expected, a slow change toward healthy behaviors-seeking health care and using hearing aids-would shed light on how to use the Internet to assist people with hearing impairment.

  • 36.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Hearing Care for Older Adults: Beyond the Audiology Clinic2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 104-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to highlight the importance of hearing health care beyond the clinic for older people with impaired hearing. Method: This article emphasizes factors affecting the success of audiologic rehabilitation for older people and describes practical clinical and community-based strategies for promoting successful hearing health care. Results: Older people are not always aware of the extent of their hearing loss, may not always expect to benefit from using a hearing aid, and often have low self-efficacy for managing to learn to use hearing aids. Increased knowledge and support from other health professionals, family caregivers, and significant others could optimize older peoples participation in everyday activities. Conclusion: Further work is needed to develop new interventions for older people with impaired hearing and to increase collaboration with general practitioners as well as other health care professionals.

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