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  • 1.
    Arkema, Elizabeth V
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Palmsten, Kristin
    University of California, San Diego, USA.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Salmon, Jane E
    Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York.
    Simard, Julia F
    Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA ;Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    What to Expect When Expecting With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE): A Population-Based Study of Maternal and Fetal Outcomes in SLE and Pre-SLE.2016In: Arthritis care & research, ISSN 2151-464X, E-ISSN 2151-4658, Vol. 68, no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To assess maternal and fetal outcomes associated with subclinical (pre-systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE] and SLE presenting up to 5 years postpartum) and prevalent maternal SLE during pregnancy compared with the general population.

    METHODS: This prospective cohort study used population-based Swedish registers to identify 13,598 women with first singleton pregnancies registered in the Medical Birth Register (551 prevalent SLE, 65 pre-SLE within 0-2 years, 133 pre-SLE within 2-5 years, and 12,847 general population). SLE was defined as ≥2 SLE-coded discharge diagnoses in the patient register with ≥1 diagnosis from a specialist. Unadjusted risks of adverse pregnancy or birth outcomes were calculated by SLE status, and Cochran-Armitage tests evaluated trend across exposure groups.

    RESULTS: Maternal outcomes such as preeclampsia, hypothyroidism, stroke, and infection were more common among women with SLE. Sixteen percent of prevalent-SLE pregnancies were diagnosed with preeclampsia compared with 5% of those from the general population. Among the pre-SLE women, preeclampsia was found in 26% of those with SLE within 2 years postpartum and 13% in those with SLE within 2-5 years postpartum. Similarly, infant outcomes, such as preterm birth, infection, and mortality, were worse among those born to mothers with prevalent SLE and pre-SLE during pregnancy. The test for trend was significant for most outcomes.

    CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrate that adverse maternal and fetal outcomes are more common in SLE pregnancies. Furthermore, these unfavorable outcomes are observed in pregnancies occurring prior to the diagnosis of SLE. Thus, the underlying immunologic profile of SLE and alterations preceding clinical SLE may contribute to these pregnancy complications.

  • 2.
    Bjurehed, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Brodin, Nina
    Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordenskiold, Ulla
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Improved Hand Function, Self-Rated Health, and Decreased Activity Limitations: Results After a Two-Month Hand Osteoarthritis Group Intervention2018In: Arthritis care & research, ISSN 2151-464X, E-ISSN 2151-4658, Vol. 70, no 7, p. 1039-1045Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To evaluate the effects on hand function, activity limitations, and self‐rated health of a primary care hand osteoarthritis (OA) group intervention. Hand OA causes pain, impaired mobility, and reduced grip force, which cause activity limitations. OA group interventions in primary care settings are sparsely reported.

    Methods

    Sixty‐four individuals with hand OA agreed to participate; 15 were excluded due to not fulfilling the inclusion criteria. The 49 remaining (90% female) participated in an OA group intervention at a primary care unit with education, paraffin wax bath, and hand exercise over a 6‐week period. Data were collected at baseline, end of intervention, and after 1 year. Instruments used were the Grip Ability Test (GAT), the Signals of Functional Impairment (SOFI), dynamometry (grip force), hand pain at rest using a visual analog scale (VAS), the Patient‐Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), the Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (Quick‐DASH), and the EuroQol VAS (EQ VAS). Data were analyzed using nonparametric statistics.

    Results

    Hand function, activity limitation, and self‐rated health significantly improved from baseline to end of intervention, grip force (right hand: P < 0.001; left hand: P = 0.008), SOFI (P = 0.011), GAT (P < 0.001), hand pain at rest (P < 0.001), PSFS (1: P = 0.008, 2: P < 0.001, and 3: P = 0.004), Quick‐DASH (P = 0.001), and EQ VAS (P = 0.039), and the effects were sustained after 1 year.

    Conclusion

    The hand OA group intervention in primary care improves hand function, activity limitation, and self‐rated health. The benefits are sustained 1 year after completion of the intervention.

  • 3.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    School of Health Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Stenström, Birgitta
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Sverker, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Foot barriers in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: an interview study among Swedish women and men2018In: Arthritis care & research, ISSN 2151-464X, E-ISSN 2151-4658, Vol. 70, no 9, p. 1348-1354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Foot impairments are related to reduced mobility and participation restrictions in daily activities in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The new biological medications are effective and reduce disease activity, but not disability to the same extent. Foot impairments are assumed to be related to participation restrictions also in patients with early RA, diagnosed after the introduction of biological medications. The knowledge of foot impairments needs to be more explored after the introduction of biological disease-modifying drugs (bDMARDs). The aim of this study was to explore the patients' perspective of foot impairments related to early RA.

    METHODS: The sample included 59 patients (20-63 years) who were interviewed about participation dilemmas in daily life using the Critical Incident Technique. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Data related to foot impairments were extracted and analyzed thematically. A research partner validated the analysis. The study was approved by the Regional Ethics Committee.

    RESULTS: Patients with early RA described a variety of participation restrictions related to foot impairments: 1) foot hindrances in domestic life, 2) foot impairments influencing work, 3) leisure activities restricted by one's feet 4) struggling to be mobile 5) foot impairments as an early sign of rheumatic disease.

    CONCLUSION: There is a need to focus on foot impairments related to early RA, and for health care professionals to understand these signs. A suggestion for future research is to conduct a longitudinal follow-up of foot impairment related to medication, disease activity and disability in patients diagnosed after the introduction of bDMARDs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Kalkan, Almina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hallert, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Roback, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Physician Preferences and Variations in Prescription of Biologic Drugs for Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Register-Based Study of 4,010 Patients in Sweden2015In: Arthritis care & research, ISSN 2151-464X, E-ISSN 2151-4658, Vol. 67, no 12, p. 1679-1685Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The prescription of biologic drugs for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients has varied considerably across different regions. Previous studies have shown physician preferences to be an important determinant in the decision to select biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) rather than nonbiologic, synthetic DMARDs (sDMARDs) alone. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that physician preferences are an important determinant for prescribing bDMARDs for RA patients in Sweden. Methods. Using data from the Swedish Rheumatology Quality Register, we identified 4,010 RA patients who were not prescribed bDMARDs during the period 2008-2012, but who, on at least 1 occasion, had an sDMARD prescription and changed treatment for the first time to either a new sDMARD or a bDMARD. Physician preference for the use of bDMARDs was calculated using data on each physicians prescriptions during the study period. The relationship between prescription of a bDMARD and physician preference, controlling for patient characteristics, disease activity, and the physicians local context was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression. Results. When adjusting for patient characteristics, disease activity, and the physicians local context, physician preference was an important predictor for prescription of bDMARDs. Compared with patients of a physician in the lowest preference tertile, patients of physicians in the highest and middle tertiles had an odds ratio for receiving bDMARDs of 2.8 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 2.13-3.68) and 1.28 (95% CI 1.05-1.57), respectively. Conclusion. Physician preference is an important determinant for prescribing bDMARDs.

  • 5.
    Parodis, Ioannis
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Benavides, Angie H. Lopez
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Zickert, Agneta
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Susanne
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Moller, Sonia
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Welin, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Voss, Anne
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Gunnarsson, Iva
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    The Impact of Belimumab and Rituximab on Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients With SystemicLupus Erythematosus2019In: Arthritis care & research, ISSN 2151-464X, E-ISSN 2151-4658, Vol. 71, no 6, p. 811-821Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectiveAccumulating evidence supports an impaired health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We investigated the effects of 2 biologic treatments on HRQoL of patients with SLE. MethodsPatients with SLE from the Karolinska University Hospital treated with belimumab (n = 34) or rituximab (n = 35) were included; normative values derived from Swedish population-based controls matched for age and sex were used for the purpose of comparisons. Data were collected prospectively at treatment initiation and at months 3, 6, 12, and 24, using the Short Form 36 (SF-36) health questionnaire, the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue (FACIT-Fatigue) scale, the EuroQol 5-dimension (EQ-5D) instrument, and the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire disability index (HAQ DI). ResultsSubstantial decrements from Swedish norms were observed across all SF-36 domains at baseline. Patients treated with belimumab reported gradual improvements in the SF-36 physical component summary (significant from month 12; P = 0.023) and FACIT-Fatigue (significant by month 24; P = 0.001), no changes in EQ-5D scores, and improvements in HAQ DI by month 6 (P = 0.014). Patients treated with rituximab showed rapid improvements in the SF-36 mental component summary and FACIT-Fatigue by month 3 (P = 0.031 and P = 0.007, respectively), as well as improvements in EQ-5D at month 6 (P = 0.016) and HAQ DI at month 3 (P = 0.033). Based on baseline evaluations, patients receiving antimalarial agents (n = 33) performed better in the SF-36 social functioning (P = 0.022) and mental health (P = 0.023) domains compared to patients who did not receive antimalarial agents (n = 36). ConclusionOur results corroborated previous findings of considerable HRQoL impairments in patients with SLE. Patients perceptions of HRQoL showed discrepant patterns over time in the 2 treatment groups and could provide additional information along with the clinical evaluation of biologic therapy in SLE. Further survey on the effects of antimalarial agents on the HRQoL of patients with SLE in larger cohorts is merited.

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