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  • 1.
    Giöstad, Alice
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Nyman, Erika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Patient Characteristics in Ulnar Nerve Compression at the Elbow at a Tertiary Referral Hospital and Predictive Factors for Outcomes of Simple Decompression versus Subcutaneous Transposition of the Ulnar Nerve2019In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2019, article id 5302462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patient characteristics and predictive factors for outcomes were analysed in 202 cases undergoing simple decompression, primary subcutaneous transposition, or secondary subcutaneous transposition for ulnar nerve compression at the elbow at a tertiary referral hospital. Data from medical charts and a survey were evaluated. The mean patient age was 49 years with revision surgery cases being significantly younger. Sixty-one percent of cases were female, and 31% were smokers. The comorbidity was extensive, including other nerve compression lesions as well as neck and shoulder problems. Overall, 53% reported being pleased with the result of surgery and 57% of the cases rated function as better or completely recovered after surgery. The median postoperative DASH (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand) score was 26 (IQR 11-49), which is in accordance with unpublished national data. No significant differences in DASH scores were found between surgical groups, but a higher preoperative McGowan grade was significantly associated with a poorer postoperative DASH score. Women scored greater disability postoperatively than men. There was a significantly increased risk of complications, which was doubled for smokers, following primary and secondary transposition compared to simple decompression. Surgical cases with ulnar nerve compression treated at a tertiary referral hospital constitute a heterogeneous group with great comorbidity and frequent concomitant nerve compression lesions. We suggest simple decompression as the procedure of first choice. Transposition can be used in selected cases or when simple decompression fails. All patients should be strongly recommended to stop smoking considering the remarkably increased risk for complications among smokers.

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  • 2.
    Hjertberg, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Uustal, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Pihl, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Maternal Body Mass Index and Anovaginal Distance in Active Phase of Term Labor2018In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, article id 1532949Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. To evaluate if there was a difference in the anovaginal distance (AVD) measured by transperineal ultrasound between obese and normal weight women. Material and Methods. A prospective observational study including 207 primiparous women at term in first stage of labor. Transperineal ultrasound with a vaginal probe was used to measure the AVD. Maternal, pregnancy, and delivery characteristics potentially associated with perineal thickness were extracted from womans medical records. The participants were divided into three BMI groups based on maternal weight in early pregnancy: normal weight (BMI amp;lt; 25), overweight (BMI 25-29.9), and obesity (BMI amp;gt;= 30). Obese and overweight women were compared with normal weight women regarding the AVD. Results. The mean AVD was 24.3, 24.9, and 27.0 mm in the normal weight, overweight, and obesity group, respectively. There were no group differences in background characteristics. The AVD was significantly longer in obese women compared with normal weight women (p = 0.018). Conclusions. The observed longer AVD in obese women might be protective of the anal sphincter complex, explaining lower rates of anal sphincter injuries in this group. Further studies are indicated to evaluate whether the length of the AVD plays a role in the risk assessment of obstetric anal sphincter injury.

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  • 3.
    Jiao, Yu
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Capital Medical University, Peoples R China.
    Palmgren, Bjorn
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Novozhilova, Ekaterina
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Englund Johansson, Ulrica
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Spieles-Engemann, Anne L.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Kale, Ajay
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Stupp, Samuel I.
    Northwestern University, IL 60208 USA; Northwestern University, IL 60208 USA; Northwestern University, IL 60208 USA; Northwestern University, IL 60208 USA.
    Olivius, Petri
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    BDNF Increases Survival and Neuronal Differentiation of Human Neural Precursor Cells Cotransplanted with a Nanofiber Gel to the Auditory Nerve in a Rat Model of Neuronal Damage2014In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2014, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. To study possible nerve regeneration of a damaged auditory nerve by the use of stem cell transplantation. Methods. We transplanted HNPCs to the rat AN trunk by the internal auditory meatus (IAM). Furthermore, we studied if addition of BDNF affects survival and phenotypic differentiation of the grafted HNPCs. A bioactive nanofiber gel (PA gel), in selected groups mixed with BDNF, was applied close to the implanted cells. Before transplantation, all rats had been deafened by a round window niche application of beta-bungarotoxin. This neurotoxin causes a selective toxic destruction of the AN while keeping the hair cells intact. Results. Overall, HNPCs survived well for up to six weeks in all groups. However, transplants receiving the BDNF-containing PA gel demonstrated significantly higher numbers of HNPCs and neuronal differentiation. At six weeks, a majority of the HNPCs had migrated into the brain stem and differentiated. Differentiated human cells as well as neurites were observed in the vicinity of the cochlear nucleus. Conclusion. Our results indicate that human neural precursor cells (HNPC) integration with host tissue benefits from additional brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) treatment and that these cells appear to be good candidates for further regenerative studies on the auditory nerve (AN).

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  • 4.
    Kamolz, Lars-Peter
    et al.
    Medical University of Graz, Austria.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Finnerty, Celeste
    University of Texas Medical Branch, TX 77555 USA.
    Kasper, Cornelia
    University of Nat Resources and Life Science, Austria.
    Editorial Material: Skin Regeneration, Repair, and Reconstruction in BIOMED RESEARCH INTERNATIONAL, vol , issue 892031, pp2015In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2015, p. 1-, article id 892031Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 5.
    Kim, Namkeun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Chang, You
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A Three-Dimensional Finite-Element Model of a Human Dry Skull for Bone-Conduction Hearing2014In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2014, no 519429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A three-dimensional finite-element (FE) model of a human dry skull was devised for simulation of human bone-conduction (BC) hearing. Although a dry skull is a simplification of the real complex human skull, such model is valuable for understanding basic BC hearing processes. For validation of the model, the mechanical point impedance of the skull as well as the acceleration of the ipsilateral and contralateral cochlear bone was computed and compared to experimental results. Simulation results showed reasonable consistency between the mechanical point impedance and the experimental measurements when Youngs modulus for skull and polyurethane was set to be 7.3 GPa and 1 MPa with 0.01 and 0.1 loss factors at 1 kHz, respectively. Moreover, the acceleration in the medial-lateral direction showed the best correspondence with the published experimental data, whereas the acceleration in the inferior-superior direction showed the largest discrepancy. However, the results were reasonable considering that different geometries were used for the 3D FE skull and the skull used in the published experimental study. The dry skull model is a first step for understanding BC hearing mechanism in a human head and simulation results can be used to predict vibration pattern of the bone surrounding the middle and inner ear during BC stimulation.

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  • 6.
    Luque-Moreno, Carlos
    et al.
    San Camillo IRCCS, Italy; Univ Cadiz, Spain; Hosp Univ Virgen Rocio, Spain.
    Cano-Bravo, Fatima
    Hosp Univ Virgen Rocio, Spain.
    Kiper, Pawel
    San Camillo IRCCS, Italy.
    Solis-Marcos, Ignacio
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Moral-Munoz, Jose A.
    Univ Cadiz, Spain.
    Agostini, Michela
    San Camillo IRCCS, Italy.
    Oliva-Pascual-Vaca, Angel
    Univ Seville, Spain.
    Turolla, Andrea
    San Camillo IRCCS, Italy.
    Reinforced Feedback in Virtual Environment for Plantar Flexor Poststroke Spasticity Reduction and Gait Function Improvement2019In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2019, article id 6295263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Ankle spasticity is a frequent phenomenon that limits functionality in poststroke patients. Objectives. Our aim was to determine if there was decreased spasticity in the ankle plantar flex (PF) muscles in the plegic lower extremity (LE) and improvement of gait function in stroke patients after traditional rehabilitation (TR) in combination with virtual reality with reinforced feedback, which is termed "reinforced feedback virtual environment" (RFVE). Methods. The evaluation, before and after treatment, of 10 hemiparetic patients was performed using the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), Functional Ambulatory Category (FAC), and Functional Independence Measure (FIM). The intervention consisted of 1 hour/day of TR plus 1 hour/day of RFVE (5 days/week for 3 weeks; 15 sessions in total). Results. The MAS and FAC reached statistical significance (Pamp;lt;0.05). The changes in the FIM did not reach statistical significance (P=0.066). The analysis between the ischemic and haemorrhagic patients showed significant differences in favour of the haemorrhagic group in the FIM scale. A significant correlation between the FAC and the months after the stroke was established (P=-0.711). Indeed, patients who most increased their score on the FAC at the end of treatment were those who started the treatment earliest after stroke. Conclusions. The combined treatment of TR and RFVE showed encouraging results regarding the reduction of spasticity and improvement of gait function. An early commencement of the treatment seems to be ideal, and future research should increase the sample size and assessment tools.

  • 7.
    Rudner, Mary
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Cognitive spare capacity and speech communication: a narrative overview2014In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2014, no 869726Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background noise can make speech communication tiring and cognitively taxing, especially for individuals with hearing impairment. It is now well established that better working memory capacity is associated with better ability to understand speech under adverse conditions as well as better ability to benefit from the advanced signal processing in modern hearing aids. Recent work has shown that although such processing cannot overcome hearing handicap, it can increase cognitive spare capacity, that is, the ability to engage in higher level processing of speech. This paper surveys recent work on cognitive spare capacity and suggests new avenues of investigation.

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  • 8.
    Rundqvist, Louise
    et al.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Blomstrand, Peter
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Dept Clin Physiol, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Emma
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Faresjo, Maria
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Resting Level of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Is Not at Play in Cardiac Enlargement in Endurance-Trained Adolescents2019In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2019, article id 9647964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. The study aimed to investigate resting levels of several selected growth and metabolic hormones in a group of 24 endurance-trained adolescents (aged 13-19 years) compared with 24 untrained age- and sex-matched controls, and to investigate if increased cardiac dimensions were related to these hormones at rest with emphasis on insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Methods. The hormones (cortisol, IGF-1, IGF-2, follicle-stimulating hormone, growth hormone, luteinizing hormone, prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone) were analysed with chemiluminescence microparticle immunoassay (CMIA) or multiplex fluorochrome (Luminex) technique. Cardiac dimensions were assessed by echocardiographic examination at rest. Peak oxygen uptake was obtained by a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test on a treadmill. Results. Circulating levels of analysed hormones at rest did not differ between the groups. A correlation was found between increased cardiac dimensions and IGF-1 in the controls, but not in the active group. This correlation declined also among the controls when the cardiac parameters were indexed for body surface area. Conclusion. Increased cardiac dimensions in endurance-trained adolescents could not be related to resting levels of hormones associated with growth and metabolism, including IGF-1 and GH. In addition, the resting levels of these hormones seem not to be affected by intense regular endurance exercise in adolescents. These findings may contribute to the knowledge about cellular signaling that trigger growth as well as cardiac adaptation to endurance training in young athletes.

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  • 9.
    Sandlund, Marlene
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University,Umeå, Sweden.
    Pohl, Petra
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University,Umeå, Sweden.
    Ahlgren, Christina
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University,Umeå, Sweden.
    Skelton, Dawn A
    School of Health and Life Sciences, Institute of Applied Health Research, Glasgow Caledonian University, UK.
    Melander-Wikman, Anita
    Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Bergvall-Kåreborn, Birgitta
    Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University,Umeå, Sweden.
    Gender Perspective on Older People's Exercise Preferences and Motivators in the Context of Falls Prevention: A Qualitative Study.2018In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2018, article id 6865156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Several factors have previously been identified to positively influence the uptake and adherence for fall prevention exercise programmes. There is, however, a lack of studies investigating if men and women differ in their views and preferences for fall prevention exercises.

    Aim: To explore exercise preferences and motivators of older community-dwelling women and men in the context of falls prevention from a gender perspective.

    Methods: Workshops including multistage focus group discussions were conducted with 18 older community-dwelling people with and without history of falls. Participants were purposively selected and divided into two groups. Each group met on six occasions over a period of five months. Participatory and Appreciative Action and Reflection methodology was used to guide the discussions. A qualitative content analysis approach was used in the analysis.

    Results: Older participants had many diverse preferences and confirmed that individually tailored exercise, in terms of mode, intensity, challenge, and social context, is important. Moreover, important factors for exercise adherence and maintenance included the experience of individual confirmation; different spirit lifters to increase enjoyment; and personal tricks to maintain exercise routines. The individual differences within genders were more diverse than the differences between women and men.

    Conclusion: Exercise interventions to prevent falls should be individually tailored, based on the specific needs and preferences of the older participant, and do not appear to require gender specific approaches. To increase adherence, intrinsic motivation for exercise may be encouraged by competence enhancing confirmations, energizing spirit lifters, and practical tips for exercise maintenance. The study provides an awareness about women's and men's preferences for fall prevention exercises, and this information could be used as guidance in designing inclusive exercise interventions.

  • 10.
    Svenvik, Maria
    et al.
    Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Preterm Birth: A Prominent Risk Factor for Low Apgar Scores2015In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, article id 978079Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To determine predictive risk factors for Apgar scores less than 7 at 5 minutes at two hospitals providing tertiary care and secondary care, respectively. Methods. A retrospective registry cohort study of 21126 births (2006-2010) using data from digital medical records. Risk factors were analyzed by logistic regression analyses. Results. AS(5min) less than 7 was multivariately associated with the following: preterm birth; gestational week 32 + 0-36 + 6, OR = 3.9 (95% CI 2.9-5.3); week 28 + 0-31 + 6, OR = 8 (5-12); week less than 28 + 0, OR = 15 (8-29); postterm birth, OR = 2.0 (1.7-2.3); multiple pregnancy, OR = 3.53 (1.79-6.96); previous cesarean section, OR = 3.67 (2.31-5.81); BMI 25-29, OR = 1.30 (1.09-1.55); BMI greater than= 30 OR = 1.70 (1.20-2.41); nonnormal CTG at admission, OR = 1.98 (1.48-2.66). greater than= 1-para was associated with a decreased risk for AS(5min) less than 7, OR = 0.34 (0.25-0.47). In the univariate logistic regression analysis AS(5min) less than 7 was associated with tertiary level care, OR = 1.48 (1.17-1.87); however, in the multivariate analysis there was no significant difference. Conclusion. A number of partially preventable risk factors were identified, preterm birth being the most evident. Further, no significant difference between the two hospital levels regarding the risk for low Apgar scores was detected.

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