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  • 1.
    Bergek, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hekkert, Marko
    Universiteit Utrecht.
    Jacobsson, Staffan
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Markard, Jochen
    ETH.
    Sandén, Björn
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Truffer, Bernhard
    Universiteit Utrecht & EAWAG.
    Technological innovation systems in contexts: Conceptualizing contextual structures and interaction dynamics2015In: Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions, ISSN 2210-4224, E-ISSN 2210-4232, Vol. 16, p. 51-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract This paper addresses interactions between technological innovation systems (TIS) and wider “context structures”. While TIS studies have always considered various kinds of contextual influences, we suggest that the TIS framework can be further strengthened by a more elaborated conceptualization of TIS context structures and TIS–context interactions. For that purpose, we identify and discuss four especially important types of context structures: technological, sectorial, geographical and political. For each of these, we provide examples of different ways in which context structures can interact with a focal TIS and how our understanding of TIS dynamics is enhanced by considering them explicitly. Lessons for analysts are given and a research agenda is outlined.

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  • 2.
    Borghei, Benny Behbood
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Niche aggregation through cumulative learning: A study of multiple electric bus projects2018In: Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions, ISSN 2210-4224, E-ISSN 2210-4232, Vol. 28, p. 108-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper seeks to answer the question of how learning processes support niche aggregation. It brings together literature on strategic niche management and theoretical concepts derived from literature on project management and learning in project-based firms to analyze the ongoing standardization efforts for fast-charged electric bus systems in Europe. The analysis suggests that niche aggregation is a cyclical process that depends on two learning processes: knowledge sharing and knowledge accumulation. Whereas knowledge sharing is an interactive process that involves several organizations, knowledge accumulation is an internal organizational learning process that enables firms to move beyond local niche projects and engage in external networks. These learning processes are mutually reinforcing and jointly support niche aggregation.

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  • 3.
    Fridahl, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Linda
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    An assessment of the potential for spurring transformational change through Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs)2017In: Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions, ISSN 2210-4224, E-ISSN 2210-4232, Vol. 25, p. 35-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fulfilling the UN Paris Agreement on climate change requires societal change at transformational scales, with associated challenges that are intensified in developing countries. In this context, Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) – a key instrument in support of developing countries’ climate actions – are promoted for their high theoretical transformative potential. However, little is known of how NAMAs are related to transformation in practice. This article studies how developing countries intend to use the instrument to implement climate actions and whether these intentions are related to how transformation can be spurred at landscape, regime, and niche levels. 144 developing countries’ Intended Nationally Determined Contributions to the Paris Agreement are examined alongside 17 representative NAMA proposals. Although there is scope to improve consideration of the instrument’s theoretically high transformative potential in actual design, current practices indicate that spurring transformational change is already a high priority of NAMA designers.

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  • 4.
    Jacobsson, Staffan
    et al.
    Department of Energy and Environment, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg.
    Bergek, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Innovation system analyses and sustainability transitions: Contributions and suggestions for research2011In: Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions, ISSN 2210-4224, E-ISSN 2210-4232, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 41-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper argues (1) that technology-specific policies are necessary if we are to meet the climate challenge and (2) that a main contribution of innovation system (IS) analysis to the study of sustainability transitions is that it allows policy makers to identify the processes and components in a system where intervention is likely to matter most. We demonstrate that an IS framework can identify a diverse set of system weaknesses in the field of environmental innovation and identify five venues for further research that can help strengthen the framework and improve its application to environmental innovations.

  • 5.
    Kanda, Wisdom
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management.
    Kuisma, Mika
    Kivimaa, Paula
    Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE), Finland.
    Hjelm, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management.
    Conceptualising the systemic activities of intermediaries in sustainability transitions2020In: Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions, ISSN 2210-4224, E-ISSN 2210-4232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contributes to the literature on sustainability transitions, innovation systems, and eco-innovation by addressing conceptual challenges regarding the systemic activities of inter-mediaries. Specifically, the article addresses a research gap pertaining to the ways in which the systemic activities of (eco-)innovation intermediaries can be conceptualised and empirically demonstrated. Empirically, the paper examines selected intermediaries in the context of support systems for eco-innovators in three regions across Finland, Germany, and Sweden. Drawing from our empirical findings and the literature on intermediaries, we conceptualise three system levels within which intermediation occurs: (i) in-between entities in a network, (ii) in-between networks of entities, and (iii) in-between actors, networks, and institutions. Our discussion suggests a heterogeneity of roles that individual intermediaries take at multiple system levels, complementing an emerging, more nuanced perspective of intermediaries in sustainability transitions. Thus, we suggest the term systemic intermediation for describing the system-level activities of intermediaries.

    The full text will be freely available from 2022-01-27 11:56
  • 6.
    Koehler, Jonathan
    et al.
    Fraunhofer ISI, Germany.
    Geels, Frank W.
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Kern, Florian
    Inst Ecol Econ Res, Germany.
    Markard, Jochen
    ETH, Switzerland.
    Onsongo, Elsie
    Int Inst Social Studies, Netherlands.
    Wieczorek, Anna
    Eindhoven Univ Technol, Netherlands.
    Alkemade, Floortje
    Eindhoven Univ Technol, Netherlands.
    Avelino, Flor
    Erasmus Univ, Netherlands.
    Bergek, Anna
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Boons, Frank
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Funfschilling, Lea
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Hess, David
    Vanderbilt Univ, TN 37235 USA.
    Holtz, Georg
    Wuppertal Inst Climate Environm and Energy, Germany.
    Hyysalo, Sampsa
    Aalto Univ, Finland.
    Jenkins, Kirsten
    Univ Brighton, England.
    Kivimaa, Paula
    Univ Sussex, England.
    Martiskainen, Mari
    Univ Sussex, England.
    McMeekin, Andrew
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Muehlemeier, Marie Susan
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Nykvist, Bjorn
    SEI, Sweden.
    Pel, Bonno
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Belgium.
    Raven, Rob
    Monash Univ, Australia.
    Rohracher, Harald
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sanden, Bjorn
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Schot, Johan
    Univ Sussex, England.
    Sovacool, Benjamin
    Univ Sussex, England.
    Turnheim, Bruno
    Univ Manchester, England; Univ Sussex, England; Univ Paris Est Marne Vallee, France.
    Welch, Dan
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Wells, Peter
    Cardiff Univ, Wales.
    An agenda for sustainability transitions research: State of the art and future directions2019In: Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions, ISSN 2210-4224, E-ISSN 2210-4232, Vol. 31, p. 1-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on sustainability transitions has expanded rapidly in the last ten years, diversified in terms of topics and geographical applications, and deepened with respect to theories and methods. This article provides an extensive review and an updated research agenda for the field, classified into nine main themes: understanding transitions; power, agency and politics; governing transitions; civil society, culture and social movements; businesses and industries; transitions in practice and everyday life; geography of transitions; ethical aspects; and methodologies. The review shows that the scope of sustainability transitions research has broadened and connections to established disciplines have grown stronger. At the same time, we see that the grand challenges related to sustainability remain unsolved, calling for continued efforts and an acceleration of ongoing transitions. Transition studies can play a key role in this regard by creating new perspectives, approaches and understanding and helping to move society in the direction of sustainability.

  • 7.
    Mignon, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Chalmers University, Sweden.
    Kanda, Wisdom
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A typology of intermediary organizations and their impact on sustainability transition policies2018In: Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions, ISSN 2210-4224, E-ISSN 2210-4232, p. 100-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability transitions encompass changes in existing socio-technological systems. In this context, scholars have emphasized the roles that intermediaries can play for sustainability transition. However, in the literature, the organizations or actors considered to act as intermediaries are very diverse and the concept of intermediary is used interchangeably between contexts. There is a risk that policy makers face difficulties understanding differences among intermediaries and consequently use some intermediaries for unfitting purposes. In this article,we propose to identify the similarities and differences among intermediaries, which are relevant for policy design for sustainability transitions. We base our comparison on three main characteristics:intermediaries’ source of funding, their scope of action and the target recipients oftheir services. Our analysis indicates that these differences have an impact on intermediaries’ short-term or long-term orientation, actor-level or system-level focus, and demand-side or supply-side target. We end the article by discussing the implications for policy design.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-07-07 00:01
  • 8.
    Nilsson, Måns
    et al.
    Stockholm Environment Institute, Sweden / KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Division for Environmental Strategies Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hillman, Karl
    University of Gävle, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Gävle, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    How do we govern sustainable innovations?: Mapping patterns of governance for biofuels and hybrid-electric vehicle technologies2012In: Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions, ISSN 2210-4224, E-ISSN 2210-4232, Vol. 3, p. 50-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines patterns of governance aimed at sustainable technological innovation in the transport sector. It makes an overall assessment of governance emerging in the fields of biofuel and hybrid-electric vehicle (HEV) technologies, and makes a classification of its characteristics. It examines the role of different actors and levels of governance as well as preferred mechanisms and targets of governance. The assessment reveals that there are rather differential patterns of governance influencing the two fields. For instance, international-level and market-based governance are much more prevalent in biofuels, whereas industry-led and cognitive governance play comparatively stronger roles in HEV. These patterns can be understood in light of both the different institutional and actor characteristics of the two technologies, and their positions in relation to socio-technical regimes.

  • 9.
    Ottosson, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. 1980.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration.
    Shaping sustainable markets: A conceptual framework illustrated by the case of biogas in Sweden2019In: Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions, ISSN 2210-4224, E-ISSN 2210-4232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By merging findings from transition studies with recent literature on market-shaping, this paper outlines a conceptual framework that describes the shaping of sustainable markets. The framework comprises three critical processes: enabling exchange practices, proving the system and constructing the narrative. Individually, these processes generate different kinds of value – traded, demonstrated and expected value – and the value output from each process serves as input to the other two processes. Hence the value streams link the processes together. We illustrate the framework by analyzing market-shaping processes for biogas in Sweden. The case analysis shows how public and private actors have engaged in a multitude of activities that have built up the market-shaping processes. The analysis highlights the recursive nature of sustainable market-shaping, showing how key actors must repeatedly respond to tensions resulting from growth and aspirations of growth.

    The full text will be freely available from 2021-11-06 16:35
  • 10.
    van Welie, Mara J.
    et al.
    Eawag, Switzerland; Univ Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Truffer, Bernhard
    Eawag, Switzerland; Univ Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eawag, Switzerland; Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Innovation challenges of utilities in informal settlements: Combining a capabilities and regime perspective2019In: Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions, ISSN 2210-4224, E-ISSN 2210-4232, Vol. 33, p. 84-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The provision of basic services is falling short in informal settlements of cities in the Global South. In particular, public utilities have had difficulties expanding their services to the urban poor. Why is this the case despite utilities having improved their capabilities substantially over the last years? This paper investigates how innovation strategies of utilities are aligned or misaligned with the broader contexts in informal settlements, which are populated by different socio-technical regimes. We propose a framework to identify new capabilities needed by utilities to deal with these different regimes. The paper reconstructs pro-poor initiatives of a water and sewerage utility in a large East-African city and explains why they tended to fail in terms of livelihood improvement. We show how the alignment between capability portfolios and specific regime structures have set limits to the success of pro-poor innovation strategies in informal settlement contexts.

  • 11.
    Wirth, Steffen
    et al.
    Eawag – Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Duebendorf, Switzerland.
    Markard, Jochen
    Truffer, Bernhard
    Rohracher, Harald
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Informal institutions matter: professional culture and the development of biogas technology2013In: Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions, ISSN 2210-4224, E-ISSN 2210-4232, Vol. 8, p. 20-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Institutions play a crucial role for the development and diffusion of novel technologies. Many studies have analyzed the role of formal institutions such as support policies or specific R&D programs, while informal institutions have received less attention. With this paper, we contribute to the institutional analysis of emerging technological fields as we examine how the effects of formal institutions depend on informal institutional structures. We present findings from a comparative study of biogas technology in selected Austrian regions. Our findings suggest that the professional culture in which farmers are embedded modulates the effects of feed-in tariffs and investment subsidies to a considerable extent. This explains regional differences in the diffusion as well as variations in the design and operation of biogas plants. We argue that studies on emerging technologies benefit from a systematic analysis of the interplay of regulative, normative and cultural-cognitive institutions. We also argue that socio-technical variation is an important indicator to look at in addition to diffusion rates.

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