liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 85
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nilsson, David
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Svensson, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Chen, Miaoxiang
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Malmström, Anna
    ACREO Institute, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Remonen, Tommi
    ACREO Institute, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Kugler, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Active Matrix Displays Based on All-Organic Electrochemical Smart Pixels Printed on Paper2002In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 14, no 20, 1460-1464 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An organic electronic paper display technology (see Figure and also inside front cover) is presented. The electrochromic display cell together with the addressing electrochemical transistor form simple smart pixels that are included in matrix displays, which are achieved on coated cellulose-based paper using printing techniques. The ion-electronic technology presented offers an opportunity to extend existing use of ordinary paper.

     

  • 2.
    Andersson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Robinson, Nathaniel D.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Switchable Charge Traps in Polymer Diodes2005In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 17, no 14, 1798-1803 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Atxabal, Ainhoa
    et al.
    CIC NanoGUNE, Spain.
    Braun, Slawomir
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Arnold, Thorsten
    Technical University of Dresden, Germany.
    Sun, Xiangnan
    National Centre Nanosci and Technology, Peoples R China.
    Parui, Subir
    CIC NanoGUNE, Spain.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gozalvez, Cristian
    University of Basque Country UPV EHU, Spain.
    Llopis, Roger
    CIC NanoGUNE, Spain.
    Mateo-Alonso, Aurelio
    University of Basque Country UPV EHU, Spain; Basque Fdn Science, Spain.
    Casanova, Felix
    CIC NanoGUNE, Spain; Basque Fdn Science, Spain.
    Ortmann, Frank
    Technical University of Dresden, Germany.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hueso, Luis E.
    CIC NanoGUNE, Spain; Basque Fdn Science, Spain.
    Energy Level Alignment at Metal/Solution-Processed Organic Semiconductor Interfaces2017In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 29, no 19, 1606901Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy barriers between the metal Fermi energy and the molecular levels of organic semiconductor devoted to charge transport play a fundamental role in the performance of organic electronic devices. Typically, techniques such as electron photoemission spectroscopy, Kelvin probe measurements, and in-device hot-electron spectroscopy have been applied to study these interfacial energy barriers. However, so far there has not been any direct method available for the determination of energy barriers at metal interfaces with n-type polymeric semiconductors. This study measures and compares metal/solution-processed electron-transporting polymer interface energy barriers by in-device hot-electron spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy. It not only demonstrates in-device hot-electron spectroscopy as a direct and reliable technique for these studies but also brings it closer to technological applications by working ex situ under ambient conditions. Moreover, this study determines that the contamination layer coming from air exposure does not play any significant role on the energy barrier alignment for charge transport. The theoretical model developed for this work confirms all the experimental observations.

  • 4.
    Berggren, Magnus
    et al.
    Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, USA.
    Dodabalapur, A
    Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, USA.
    Bao, ZN
    Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, USA.
    Slusher, RE
    Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, USA.
    Solid-state droplet laser made from an organic blend with a conjugated polymer emitter1997In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 9, no 12, 968- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lasers based on organic materials have been produced with a wide range of resonator design and in a variety of geometries. A new strategy is presented for fabricating permanently near-spherical whispering gallery mode (WGM) lasers from a blend of PPV7 and PBD (see Figure) by a melting and resolidification process. The thresholds and quality factors of these resonators are estimated and discussed.

  • 5.
    Berggren, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Granström, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Ultraviolet electroluminescence from an organic light emitting diode1995In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 7, no 11, 900-903 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extension of the emission region for organic LEDs into the ultraviolet region is reported. Emission at 394 nm is achieved by modifying the geometry of a device based on poly(octylphenyl)bithiophene (PTOPT) and poly(octylphenyl)oxadiazole (PBD) which had previously been shown to emit white light. Through changing the geometry the red and green emission peaks have been suppressed and the UV band (from the PBD) enhanced.

  • 6.
    Berggren, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gustafsson, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Wennerström, Olof
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Hjertberg, Thomas
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Green Electroluminescence in Poly-(3-cyclohexylthiophene) light-emitting diodes1994In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 6, no 6, 488-490 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electoluminescent devices based on polythiophene-system this films have been demonstrated that together span the entire visible range, steric hindrance being used to vary the bandgap between compunds. Poly-(3-cyclohexylthiophene), see Figures, exhibits green electoluminescence. Possible interpretations of this observation are proposed.

  • 7.
    Berggren, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta
    Organic bioelectronics2007In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 19, no 20, 3201-3213 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last two decades, organic electroactive materials have been explored as the working material in a vast array of electronic devices, promising low-cost, flexible, and easily manufactured systems. The same materials also possess features that make them unique in bioelectronics applications, where electronic signals are translated into biosignals and vice versa. Here we review, in the broadest sense, the field of organic bioelectronics, describing the electronic properties and mechanisms of the organic electronic materials that are utilized in specific biological experiments.

  • 8.
    Berggren, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simon, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nilsson, D
    Acreo Swedish ICT, Box 787, SE-601 17, Norrköping, Sweden..
    Dyreklev, P
    Acreo Swedish ICT, Box 787, SE-601 17, Norrköping, Sweden..
    Norberg, P
    Acreo Swedish ICT, Box 787, SE-601 17, Norrköping, Sweden..
    Nordlinder, S
    Acreo Swedish ICT, Box 787, SE-601 17, Norrköping, Sweden..
    Ersman, PA
    Acreo Swedish ICT, Box 787, SE-601 17, Norrköping, Sweden..
    Gustafsson, G
    Acreo Swedish ICT, Box 787, SE-601 17, Norrköping, Sweden..
    Wikner, Jacob
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Integrated Circuits and Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hederén, J
    DU Radio, Ericsson AB, SE-583 30, Linköping, Sweden..
    Hentzell, H
    Swedish ICT Research, Box 1151, SE-164 26, Kista, Sweden..
    Browsing the Real World using Organic Electronics, Si-Chips, and a Human Touch.2016In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 28, no 10, 1911-1916 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic electronics have been developed according to an orthodox doctrine advocating "all-printed, "all-organic and "ultra-low-cost primarily targeting various e-paper applications. In order to harvest from the great opportunities afforded with organic electronics potentially operating as communication and sensor outposts within existing and future complex communication infrastructures, high-quality computing and communication protocols must be integrated with the organic electronics. Here, we debate and scrutinize the twinning of the signal-processing capability of traditional integrated silicon chips with organic electronics and sensors, and to use our body as a natural local network with our bare hand as the browser of the physical world. The resulting platform provides a body network, i.e., a personalized web, composed of e-label sensors, bioelectronics, and mobile devices that together make it possible to monitor and record both our ambience and health-status parameters, supported by the ubiquitous mobile network and the resources of the "cloud".

  • 9.
    Bobbert, Peter A.
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Sharma, Abhinav
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Mathijssen, Simon G. J.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands; Philips Research Labs, Netherlands.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    de Leeuw, Dago M.
    Philips Research Labs, Netherlands.
    Operational Stability of Organic Field-Effect Transistors2012In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 24, no 9, 1146-1158 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are considered in technological applications for which low cost or mechanical flexibility are crucial factors. The environmental stability of the organic semiconductors used in OFETs has improved to a level that is now sufficient for commercialization. However, serious problems remain with the stability of OFETs under operation. The causes for this have remained elusive for many years. Surface potentiometry together with theoretical modeling provide new insights into the mechanisms limiting the operational stability. These indicate that redox reactions involving water are involved in an exchange of mobile charges in the semiconductor with protons in the gate dielectric. This mechanism elucidates the established key role of water and leads in a natural way to a universal stress function, describing the stretched exponential-like time dependence ubiquitously observed. Further study is needed to determine the generality of the mechanism and the role of other mechanisms.

  • 10.
    Bohme, O
    et al.
    Tech Univ Cottbus, D-03044 Cottbus, Germany Linkoping Univ, Swedish Sensor Ctr, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Lloyd-Spets, Anita
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Schmeisser, D
    Tech Univ Cottbus, D-03044 Cottbus, Germany Linkoping Univ, Swedish Sensor Ctr, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Nanoparticles as the active element of high-temperature metal-insulator-silicon carbide gas sensors2001In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 13, no 8, 597-+ p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sensor performance of MISiC (metal-insulator-silicon carbide) diode devices depends on their temperature pretreatment: an activation step at 600 degreesC leads to fast-responding devices with extraordinarily high signals but the devices fail when operated above 700 degreesC. The authors focus on the key role of nanoparticles in high-temperature gas sensor applications of these MISiC devices, presenting a model in which the interface dipole moment of nanoparticles is seen as the driving force and explaining the difference in response of capacitor-configuration and Schottky-diode-configuration devices.

  • 11.
    Campana, Alessandra
    et al.
    CNR-ISMN, Bologna, Italy; University of Bologna, Italy .
    Cramer, Tobias
    CNR-ISMN, Bologna, Italy.
    Simon, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. null.
    Biscarini, Fabio
    CNR-ISMN, Bologna, Italy; University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy .
    Electrocardiographic recording with conformable organic electrochemical transistor fabricated on resorbable bioscaffold2014In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 26, no 23, 3874-3878 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic electrochemical transistors are fabricated on a poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) substrate. Fast and sensitive performance of the transistors allows recording of the electrocardiogram. The result paves the way for new types of bioelectronic interfaces with reduced invasiveness due to bioresorption and soft mechanical properties.

  • 12. Chen, LC
    et al.
    Godovsky, D
    Linkoping Univ, IFM, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Groningen, Stratingh Inst, NL-9747 AG Groningen, Netherlands Eindhoven Univ Technol, Lab Macromol & Organ Chem, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven, Netherlands Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Organ Chem, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Polymer Technol, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics .
    Hummelen, JC
    Linkoping Univ, IFM, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Groningen, Stratingh Inst, NL-9747 AG Groningen, Netherlands Eindhoven Univ Technol, Lab Macromol & Organ Chem, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven, Netherlands Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Organ Chem, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Polymer Technol, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Janssens, RAJ
    Linkoping Univ, IFM, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Groningen, Stratingh Inst, NL-9747 AG Groningen, Netherlands Eindhoven Univ Technol, Lab Macromol & Organ Chem, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven, Netherlands Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Organ Chem, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Polymer Technol, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson, M
    Andersson, MR
    Polymer photovoltaic devices from stratified multilayers of donor-acceptor blends2000In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 12, no 18, 1367-1370 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Chen, LC
    et al.
    Roman, LS
    Linkoping Univ, Appl Phys Lab, IFM, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Organ Chem & Polymer Technol, SE-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden Eindhoven Univ Technol, Lab Macromol & Organ Chem, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Johansson, DM
    Svensson, M
    Andersson, MR
    Janssen, RAJ
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics .
    Excitation transfer in polymer photodiodes for enhanced quantum efficiency2000In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 12, no 15, 1110-+ p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The realization of polymer solar cells is the driving force behind this research. In an idea inspired by photosynthesis, the authors have constructed efficient bilayer photodiodes by a well-chosen combination of conjugated polymers (see Figure) in the donor layer. Forster energy transfer within the donor layer allows the absorbed light to be channeled to the C-60 acceptor layer, improving the total photoconversion of the blend device.

  • 14.
    Christian Roelofs, W. S.
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands; Philips Research Labs, Netherlands.
    Spijkman, Mark-Jan
    Philips Research Labs, Netherlands.
    Mathijssen, Simon G. J.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Janssen, Rene A. J.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    de Leeuw, Dago M.
    Max Planck Institute Polymer Research, Germany; King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Eindhoven University of Technology, MB, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Fundamental Limitations for Electroluminescence in Organic Dual-Gate Field-Effect Transistors2014In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 26, no 26, 4450-+ p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A dual-gate organic field-effect transistor is investigated for electrically pumped lasing. The two gates can independently accumulate electrons and holes, yielding current densities exceeding the lasing threshold. Here, the aim is to force the electrons and holes to recombine by confining the charges in a single semiconducting film. It is found that independent hole and electron accumulation is mutually exclusive with vertical recombination and light emission.

  • 15.
    Conings, Bert
    et al.
    Hasselt University, Belgium; University of Oxford, England.
    Babayigit, Aslihan
    Hasselt University, Belgium; University of Oxford, England.
    Klug, Matthew T.
    University of Oxford, England.
    Bai, Sai
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Oxford, England.
    Gauquelin, Nicolas
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Sakai, Nobuya
    University of Oxford, England.
    Tse-Wei Wang, Jacob
    University of Oxford, England.
    Verbeeck, Johan
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Boyen, Hans-Gerd
    Hasselt University, Belgium.
    Snaith, Henry J.
    University of Oxford, England.
    A Universal Deposition Protocol for Planar Heterojunction Solar Cells with High Efficiency Based on Hybrid Lead Halide Perovskite Families2016In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 28, no 48, 10701-+ p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A robust and expedient gas quenching method is developed for the solution deposition of hybrid perovskite thin films. The method offers a reliable standard practice for the fabrication of a non-exhaustive variety of perovskites exhibiting excellent film morphology and commensurate high performance in both regular and inverted structured solar cell architectures.

  • 16.
    Cui, Yong
    et al.
    Chinese Academic Science, Peoples R China; University of Chinese Academic Science, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Chenyi
    Chinese Academic Science, Peoples R China; University of Science and Technology Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Yao, Huifeng
    Chinese Academic Science, Peoples R China.
    Zhu, Jie
    Chinese Academic Science, Peoples R China; Ocean University of China, Peoples R China.
    Wang, Yuming
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jia, Guoxiao
    Chinese Academic Science, Peoples R China; University of Science and Technology Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hou, Jianhui
    Chinese Academic Science, Peoples R China; University of Chinese Academic Science, Peoples R China.
    Efficient Semitransparent Organic Solar Cells with Tunable Color enabled by an Ultralow-Bandgap Nonfullerene Acceptor2017In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 29, no 43, 1703080Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Semitransparent organic solar cells (OSCs) show attractive potential in power-generating windows. However, the development of semitransparent OSCs is lagging behind opaque OSCs. Here, an ultralow-bandgap non-fullerene acceptor, "IEICO-4Cl", is designed and synthesized, whose absorption spectrum is mainly located in the near-infrared region. When IEICO-4Cl is blended with different polymer donors (J52, PBDB-T, and PTB7-Th), the colors of the blend films can be tuned from purple to blue to cyan, respectively. Traditional OSCs with a nontransparent Al electrode fabricated by J52: IEICO-4Cl, PBDB-T: IEICO-4Cl, and PTB7-Th: IEICO-4Cl yield power conversion efficiencies (PCE) of 9.65 +/- 0.33%, 9.43 +/- 0.13%, and 10.0 +/- 0.2%, respectively. By using 15 nm Au as the electrode, semitransparent OSCs based on these three blends also show PCEs of 6.37%, 6.24%, and 6.97% with high average visible transmittance (AVT) of 35.1%, 35.7%, and 33.5%, respectively. Furthermore, via changing the thickness of Au in the OSCs, the relationship between the transmittance and efficiency is studied in detail, and an impressive PCE of 8.38% with an AVT of 25.7% is obtained, which is an outstanding value in the semitransparent OSCs.

  • 17.
    Diaz de Zerio Mendaza, Amaia
    et al.
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Melianas, Armantas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rossbauer, Stephan
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England; University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Backe, Olof
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Nordstierna, Lars
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Erhart, Paul
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Olsson, Eva
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Anthopoulos, Thomas D.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England; University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Muller, Christian
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    High-Entropy Mixtures of Pristine Fullerenes for Solution-Processed Transistors and Solar Cells2015In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 27, no 45, 7325- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The solubility of pristine fullerenes can be enhanced by mixing C-60 and C-70 due to the associated increase in configurational entropy. This "entropic dissolution" allows the preparation of field-effect transistors with an electron mobility of 1 cm(2) V-1 s(-1) and polymer solar cells with a highly reproducible power-conversion efficiency of 6%, as well as a thermally stable active layer.

  • 18.
    Dyer, Aubrey L.
    et al.
    Georgia Institute Technology, GA 30332 USA .
    Bulloch, Rayford H.
    Georgia Institute Technology, GA 30332 USA .
    Zhou, Yinhua
    Georgia Institute Technology, GA 30332 USA Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Peoples R China .
    Kippelen, Bernard
    Georgia Institute Technology, GA 30332 USA .
    Reynolds, John R.
    Georgia Institute Technology, GA 30332 USA Georgia Institute Technology, GA 30332 USA .
    Zhang, Fengling
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Vertically Integrated Solar-Powered Electrochromic Window for Energy Efficient Buildings2014In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 26, no 28, 4895-4900 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A solution-processed self-powered polymer electrochromic/photovoltaic (EC/PV) device is realized by vertically integrating two transparent PV cells with an ECD. The EC/PV cell is a net energy positive dual functional device, which can be reversibly switched between transparent and colored states by PV cells for regulating incoming sunlight through windows. The two PV cells can individually, or in pairs, generate electricity.

  • 19.
    Dyreklev, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. null.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. null.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. null.
    Andersson, Mats R.
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Wennerström, Olof
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Hjertberg, Thomas
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Polarized electroluminescence from an oriented substituted polythiophene in a light emitting diode1995In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 7, no 1, 43-45 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polarized light sources based on stretch-oriented conjugated polymers are reported. The devices, based on poly 3(4-octylphenyl)-2,2′-bithiophene, show an external quantum efficiency of 0.1% and are produced using a very simple method which may be easily extended to other polymers. The fabrication of the devices is described and factors such as the emission and spectral differences parallel and prependicular to the stretching direction discussed.

  • 20.
    Fabiano, Simone
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Braun, Slawomir
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Weverberghs, Eric
    University of Mons-UMONS, Belgium.
    Gerbaux, Pascal
    University of Mons-UMONS, Belgium.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Poly(ethylene imine) impurities induce n-doping reaction in organic (semi)conductors2014In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 26, no 34, 6000-6006 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Volatile impurities contained in polyethyleneimine (PEI), and identified as ethyleneimine dimers and trimers, are reported. These N-based molecules show a strong reducing character, as demonstrated by the change in electrical conductivity of organic (semi) conductors exposed to the PEI vapor. The results prove that electron transfer rather than a dipole effect at the electrode interface is the origin of the work-function modification by the PEI-based layers.

  • 21.
    Fabiano, Simone
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Usta, Hakan
    Polyera Corp, IL 60077 USA; Abdullah Gul University, Turkey.
    Forchheimer, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Information Coding. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Facchetti, Antonio
    Polyera Corp, IL 60077 USA.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Selective Remanent Ambipolar Charge Transport in Polymeric Field-Effect Transistors For High-Performance Logic Circuits Fabricated in Ambient2014In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 26, no 44, 7438-7443 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 22.
    Fuchs, Franz
    et al.
    CEA INAC SPrAM UMR5819 CEA CNRS UJF, France.
    Linares, Mathieu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    de Vet, Christiaan
    CEA INAC SPrAM UMR5819 CEA CNRS UJF, France.
    Leclere, Philippe
    University of Mons, Belgium.
    Demadrille, Renaud
    CEA INAC SPrAM UMR5819 CEA CNRS UJF, France.
    Grevin, Benjamin
    CEA INAC SPrAM UMR5819 CEA CNRS UJF, France.
    On the Photo-Induced Charge-Carrier Generation within Monolayers of Self-Assembled Organic Donor-Acceptor Dyads2014In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 26, no 37, 6416-6422 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 23.
    Gabrielsson, Erik O.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Janson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tybrandt, Klas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Simon, Daniel T.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Four-Diode Full-Wave Ionic Current Rectifier Based on Bipolar Membranes: Overcoming the Limit of Electrode Capacity2014In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 26, no 30, 5143-5147 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Full-wave rectification of ionic currents is obtained by constructing the typical four-diode bridge out of ion conducting bipolar membranes. Together with conjugated polymer electrodes addressed with alternating current, the bridge allows for generation of a controlled ionic direct current for extended periods of time without the production of toxic species or gas typically arising from electrode side-reactions.

  • 24.
    Gao, Feng
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Chen, Xinyi
    Nanjing University, China.
    Yin, Kuibo
    Nanjing University, China.
    Dong, Shuai
    Nanjing University, China.
    Ren, Zhifeng
    Boston College, USA.
    Yuan, Fang
    Nanjing University, China.
    Yu, Tao
    Nanjing University, China.
    Zou, Zhigang
    Nanjing University, China.
    Liu, Jun-Ming
    Nanjing University, China.
    Visible-light photocatalytic properties of weak magnetic BiFeO3 nanoparticles2007In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 19, no 19, 2889-2892 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polycrystalline BiFeO3 nanoparticles (size 80-120 nm) are prepared by a simple sol-gel technique. Such nanoparticles are very efficient for photocatalytic decomposition of organic contaminants under irradiation from ultraviolet to visible frequencies. The BiFeO3 nanoparticles also demonstrate weak ferromagnetism of about 0.06 mu(B)/Fe at room temperature, in good agreement with theoretical calculations.

  • 25.
    Gao, Feng
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Himmelberger, Scott
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Andersson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hanifi, David
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Xia, Yuxin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhang, Shaoqing
    Chinese Academic Science, Peoples R China.
    Wang, Jianpu
    Nanjing Technical University, Peoples R China; Nanjing Technical University, Peoples R China.
    Hou, Jianhui
    Chinese Academic Science, Peoples R China.
    Salleo, Alberto
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The Effect of Processing Additives on Energetic Disorder in Highly Efficient Organic Photovoltaics: A Case Study on PBDTTT-C-T:PC71BM2015In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 27, no 26, 3868-3873 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energetic disorder, an important parameter affecting the performance of organic photovoltaics, is significantly decreased upon the addition of processing additives in a highly efficient benzodithiophene-based copolymer blend (PBDTTT-C-T:PC71BM). Wide-angle and small-angle X-ray scattering measurements suggest that the origin of this reduced energetic disorder is due to increased aggregation and a larger average fullerene domain size together with purer phases.

  • 26.
    Granlund, T
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Phys & Measurement Technol, Appl Phys Lab, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Organ Chem & Polymer Technol, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Tobias
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Roman, LS
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Phys & Measurement Technol, Appl Phys Lab, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Organ Chem & Polymer Technol, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson, M
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics .
    Patterning of polymer light-emitting diodes with soft lithography2000In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 12, no 4, 269-273 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Herlogsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Marcilla, Rebeca
    CIDETEC, Spain.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fiber-Embedded Electrolyte-Gated Field-Effect Transistors for e-Textiles2009In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 21, no 5, 573-577 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrolyte-gate organic field-effect transistors embedded at the junction of textile microfibers are demonstrated. The fiber transistor operates below I V and delivers large current densities. The transience of the organic thin-film transistors current and the impedance spectroscopy measurements reveal that the channel is formed in two steps.

  • 28.
    Herlogsson, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Robinson, Nathaniel D
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sandberg, M.
    Thin Film Electronics AB.
    Hagel, O.-J.
    Thin Film Electronics AB.
    Gustafsson, G.
    Acreo AB.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Low-Voltage Polymer Field-Effect Transistors Gated via a Proton Conductor2007In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 19, no 1, 97-101 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low operating voltages for p-channel organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) can be achieved by using an electrolyte as the gate insulator. However, mobile anions in the electrolyte can lead to undesired electrochemistry in the channel. In order to avoid this, a polyanionic electrolyte is used as the gate insulator. The resulting OFET has operating voltages of less than 1 V (see figure) and shows fast switching (less than 0.3 ms) in ambient atmosphere.

  • 29.
    Herlogsson, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tierney, Steve
    Merck Chemicals Ltd..
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Polyelectrolyte-Gated Organic Complementary Circuits Operating at Low Power and Voltage2011In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 23, no 40, 4684- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, polyanionic and polycationic electrolytes are used as gate insulators in p- and n-channel thin-film transistors, respectively. These material combinations are motivated by that the mobile ions in the electrolytes will be attracted to the oppositely charged gate electrodes when the transistors are operated in the accumulation mode. The electronic charges in the semiconductor channels will thus be balanced by the polyions, which are effectively immobile and cannot penetrate into the semiconductor bulk and cause electrochemical doping.

  • 30.
    Herlogsson, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cölle, Michael
    Merck Chemicals Ltd Chilworth Science Park Southampton, SO16 7QD, UK.
    Tierney, Steven
    Merck Chemicals Ltd Chilworth Science Park Southampton, SO16 7QD,l UK.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Low-Voltage Ring Oscillators Based on Polyelectrolyte-Gated Polymer Thin-Film Transistors2010In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 22, no 1, 72-76 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A polyanionic electrolyte is used as gate insulator in top-gate p-channel polymer thin-film transistors. The high capacitance of the polyelectrolyte film allows the transistors and integrated circuits to operate below 1.5 V. Seven-stage ring oscillators that operate at supply voltages down to 0.9 V and exhibit signal propagation delays as low as 300 µs per stage are reported.

  • 31.
    Herlogsson, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Noh, Yong-Young
    Cavendish Laboratory University of Cambridge, UK.
    Zhao, Ni
    Cavendish Laboratory University of Cambridge, UK.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sirringhaus, Henning
    Cavendish Laboratory University of Cambridge, UK.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Downscaling of Organic Field-Effect Transistors with a Polyelectrolyte Gate Insulator2008In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 20, no 24, 4708-4713 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A polyelectrolyte is used as gate insulator material in organic field-effect transistors with self-aligned inkjet printed sub–micrometer channels. The small separation of the charges in the electric double layer at the electrolyte-semiconductor interface, which builds up in tens of microseconds, provides a very high transverse electric field in the channel that effectively suppresses short-channel effects at low applied gate voltages.

  • 32.
    Inganäs, Olle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Admassie, Shimelis
    University of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia .
    25th Anniversary Article: Organic Photovoltaic Modules and Biopolymer Supercapacitors for Supply of Renewable Electricity: A Perspective from Africa2014In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 26, no 6, 830-847 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of materials in civilization is well demonstrated over the centuries and millennia, as materials have come to serve as the classifier of stages of civilization. With the advent of materials science, this relation has become even more pronounced. The pivotal role of advanced materials in industrial economies has not yet been matched by the influence of advanced materials during the transition from agricultural to modern societies. The role of advanced materials in poverty eradication can be very large, in particular if new trajectories of social and economic development become possible. This is the topic of this essay, different in format from the traditional scientific review, as we try to encompass not only two infant technologies of solar energy conversion and storage by means of organic materials, but also the social conditions for introduction of the technologies. The development of organic-based photovoltaic energy conversion has been rapid, and promises to deliver new alternatives to well-established silicon photovoltaics. Our recent development of organic biopolymer composite electrodes opens avenues towards the use of renewable materials in the construction of wooden batteries or supercapacitors for charge storage. Combining these new elements may give different conditions for introduction of energy technology in areas now lacking electrical grids, but having sufficient solar energy inputs. These areas are found close to the equator, and include some of the poorest regions on earth.

  • 33.
    Inganäs, Olle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zhang, Fengling
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tvingstedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Lars Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hellstrom, Stefan
    Chalmers.
    Andersson, Mats R.
    Chalmers.
    Polymer Photovoltaics with Alternating Copolymer/Fullerene Blends and Novel Device Architectures2010In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 22, no 20, E100-E116 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The synthesis of novel conjugated polymers, designed for the purpose of photovoltaic energy conversion, and their properties in polymer/fullerene materials and photovoltaic devices are reviewed. Two families of main chain polymer donors, based on fluorene or phenylene and donor-acceptor-donor comonomers in alternating copolymers, are used to absorb the high-energy parts of the solar spectrum and to give high photovoltages in combinations with fullerene acceptors in devices. These materials are used in alternative photovoltaic device geometries with enhanced light incoupling to collect larger photocurrents or to enable tandem devices and enhance photovoltage.

  • 34.
    Jager, Edwin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Perpendicular Actuation with Individually Controlled Polymer Microactuators2001In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 13, no 1, 76-79 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Actuator systems based on conducting polymers, such as polypyrole, with which three-dimensional movement can be controlled, are described. The Figure shows a combination of two such microactuators which are used to “kick” a glass bead across the surface of a silicon wafer. The microfabrication methods used to produce the systems are described and the potential uses, for example microrobotic arms, discussed.

  • 35.
    Jan Anton Koster, L.
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands; University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Wienk, Martijn M.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Maturova, Klara
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Janssen, Rene A. J.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Quantifying Bimolecular Recombination Losses in Organic Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells2011In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 23, no 14, 1670-+ p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a new experimental technique that affords direct quantification of the fraction of charge carriers lost in poly(3-hexylthiophene): fullerene solar cells by bimolecular recombination. Depending on annealing conditions up to 17% of carriers recombine bimolecularly under solar illumination. We explain our findings with a closed analytical expression for the photocurrent generated by an organic solar cell.

  • 36.
    Jiang, Jie
    et al.
    National University of Singapore .
    Li, Xiaomin
    WinTech Nano-Technology Services Pte. Ltd, Singapore.
    Mak, Wing Cheung
    National University of Singapore .
    Trau, Dieter
    National University of Singapore .
    Integrated direct DNA/protein patterning and microfabrication by focused ion beam milling2008In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 20, no 9, 1636-1643 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Single and binary component patterning and integrated microfabrication of biomolecules, such as DNA and proteins, can be achieved by focused ion-beam (FIB) biolithography. Well-defined micropatterns are obtained by FIB milling on biomolecules immobilized on SiO2 wafers and protected by a thin Au film. The retention of biofunctionality is excellent (68–90%) and a feature size of down to 500 nm can be achieved for the patterns without significant loss of functionality.

  • 37.
    Kergoat, Loig
    et al.
    University of Paris, France.
    Herlogsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Braga, Daniele
    University of Paris, France.
    Piro, Benoit
    University of Paris, France.
    Pham, Minh-Chau
    University of Paris, France.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Horowitz, Gilles
    University of Paris, France.
    A Water-Gate Organic Field-Effect Transistor2010In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 22, no 23, 2565-2569 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-dielectric-constant insulators, organic monolayers, and electrolytes have been successfully used to generate organic field-effect transistors operating at low voltages. Here, we report on a device gated with pure water. By replacing the gate dielectric by a simple water droplet, we produce a transistor that entirely operates in the field-effect mode of operation at voltages lower than 1V. This result creates opportunities for sensor applications using water-gated devices as transducing medium.

  • 38.
    Kergoat, Loig
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Piro, Benoit
    University of Paris Diderot, France .
    Simon, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Minh-Chau Pham; Noel, Vincent
    University of Paris Diderot, France .
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Detection of Glutamate and Acetylcholine with Organic Electrochemical Transistors Based on Conducting Polymer/Platinum Nanoparticle Composites2014In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 26, no 32, 5658-5664 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study is to open a new scope for organic electrochemical transistors based on PEDOT:PSS, a material blend known for its stability and reliability. These devices can leverage molecular electrocatalysis by incorporating small amounts of nano-catalyst during the transistor manufacturing (spin coating). This methodology is very simple to implement using the know-how of nanochemistry and results in efficient enzymatic activity transduction, in this case utilizing choline oxidase and glutamate oxidase.

  • 39.
    Larsson, Oscar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Laiho, Ari
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Schmickler, Wolfgang
    University of Ulm.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Controlling the Dimensionality of Charge Transport in an Organic Electrochemical Transistor by Capacitive Coupling2011In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 23, no 41, 4764-+ p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dimensionality of charge transport in an organic electrochemical transistor depends on the degree of advancement of the electrochemical half-reaction at the organic semiconductor/electrolyte interface. A carbon nanotube (CNT) nanoporous gate electrode leads to bulk transport in the semiconductor, while a flat Au gate electrode allows for localizing of the electrochemical oxidation of the semiconducting polymer at the organic semiconductor/electrolyte interface.

  • 40.
    Li, Guangru
    et al.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Wisnivesky Rocca Rivarola, Florencia
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Davis, Nathaniel J. L. K.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Bai, Sai
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jellicoe, Tom C.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    de la Pena, Francisco
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Hou, Shaocong
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Ducati, Caterina
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Friend, Richard H.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Greenham, Neil C.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Tan, Zhi-Kuang
    University of Cambridge, England; National University of Singapore, Singapore; National University of Singapore, Singapore.
    Highly Efficient Perovskite Nanocrystal Light-Emitting Diodes Enabled by a Universal Crosslinking Method2016In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 28, no 18, 3528-+ p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The preparation of highly efficient perovskite nanocrystal light-emitting diodes is shown. A new trimethylaluminum vapor-based crosslinking method to render the nanocrystal films insoluble is applied. The resulting near-complete nanocrystal film coverage, coupled with the natural confinement of injected charges within the perovskite crystals, facilitates electron-hole capture and give rise to a remarkable electroluminescence yield of 5.7%.

  • 41.
    Lin, Yuze
    et al.
    Peking University, Peoples R China; Capital Normal University, Peoples R China.
    Zhao, Fuwen
    Chinese Academic Science, Peoples R China.
    Wu, Yang
    Xi An Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Chen, Kai
    Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.
    Xia, Yuxin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Li, Guangwu
    Beijing Normal University, Peoples R China.
    Prasad, Shyamal K. K.
    Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.
    Zhu, Jingshuai
    Capital Normal University, Peoples R China.
    Huo, Lijun
    Beihang University, Peoples R China.
    Bin, Haijun
    Chinese Academic Science, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Zhi-Guo
    Chinese Academic Science, Peoples R China.
    Guo, Xia
    Soochow University, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Maojie
    Soochow University, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Yanming
    Beihang University, Peoples R China.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wei, Zhixiang
    National Centre Nanosci and Technology, Peoples R China.
    Ma, Wei
    Xi An Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Wang, Chunru
    Chinese Academic Science, Peoples R China.
    Hodgkiss, Justin
    Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.
    Bo, Zhishan
    Beijing Normal University, Peoples R China.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Li, Yongfang
    Chinese Academic Science, Peoples R China; Soochow University, Peoples R China.
    Zhan, Xiaowei
    Peking University, Peoples R China.
    Mapping Polymer Donors toward High-Efficiency Fullerene Free Organic Solar Cells2017In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 29, no 3, UNSP 1604155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Five polymer donors with distinct chemical structures and different electronic properties are surveyed in a planar and narrow-bandgap fused-ring electron acceptor (IDIC)-based organic solar cells, which exhibit power conversion efficiencies of up to 11%.

  • 42.
    Malti, Abdellah
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gabrielsson, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    An Electrochromic Bipolar Membrane Diode2015In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 27, no 26, 3909-+ p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conducting polymers with bipolar membranes (a complementary stack of selective membranes) may be used to rectify current. Integrating a bipolar membrane into a polymer electrochromic display obviates the need for an addressing backplane while increasing the devices bistability. Such devices can be made from solution-processable materials.

  • 43.
    Mantovani Nardes, Alexandre
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Janssen, Rene A. J.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Bastiaansen, Jolanda A. M.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Kiggen, Nicole M. M.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Langeveld, Bea M. W.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    van Breemen, Albert J. J. M.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    de Kok, Margreet M.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Microscopic understanding of the anisotropic conductivity of PEDOT : PSS thin films2007In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 19, no 9, 1196-+ p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The amsotropic conductivity of thin films of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) is correlated to the film morphology as obtained from scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy images. The material was found to consist of layers of flattened PEDOT-rich particles that are separated by quasi-continuous PSS lamella (see figure).

  • 44.
    Mathijssen, Simon G. J.
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands; Philips Research Labs, Netherlands.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Sharma, Abhinav
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Coelle, Michael
    Merck Chemistry, England.
    Bobbert, Peter A.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Janssen, Rene A. J.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    de Leeuw, Dago M.
    Philips Research Labs, Netherlands.
    Charge trapping at the dielectric of organic transistors visualized in real time and space2008In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 20, no 5, 975-+ p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scanning Kelvin probe microscopy demonstrates that water-induced charge trapping at the SiO2 dielectric visualized in real time and space - is responsible for the commonly observed gate-bias-induced threshold-voltage shift in organic field-effect transistors. When a bias is applied to the electrodes, charges are injected onto the SiO2 (see background of the figure). When the contacts are grounded, the charges are released again (foreground picture).

  • 45.
    Mathijssen, Simon G. J.
    et al.
    Philips Research Labs, Netherlands; Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Spijkman, Mark-Jan
    Philips Research Labs, Netherlands; University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Andringa, Anne-Marije
    Philips Research Labs, Netherlands; University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    van Hal, Paul A.
    Philips Research Labs, Netherlands.
    McCulloch, Iain
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Janssen, Rene A. J.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    de Leeuw, Dago M.
    Philips Research Labs, Netherlands; University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Revealing Buried Interfaces to Understand the Origins of Threshold Voltage Shifts in Organic Field-Effect Transistors2010In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 22, no 45, 5105-+ p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The semiconductor of an organic field-effect transistor is stripped with adhesive tape, yielding an exposed gate dielectric, accessible for various characterization techniques. By using scanning Kelvin probe microscopy we reveal that trapped charges after gate bias stress are located at the gate dielectric and not in the semiconductor. Charging of the gate dielectric is confirmed by the fact that the threshold voltage shift remains, when a pristine organic semiconductor is deposited on the exposed gate dielectric of a stressed and delaminated field-effect transistor.

  • 46.
    Mathijssen, Simon G. J.
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands; Philips Research Labs, Netherlands.
    van Hal, Paul A.
    Philips Research Labs, Netherlands.
    van den Biggelaar, Ton J. M.
    Philips Research Labs, Netherlands.
    Smits, Edsger C. P.
    Philips Research Labs, Netherlands; University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    de Boer, Bert
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Janssen, Rene A. J.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    de Leeuw, Dago M.
    Philips Research Labs, Netherlands; University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Manipulating the local light emission in organic light-emitting diodes by using patterned self-assembled monolayers2008In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 20, no 14, 2703-+ p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patterned organic light-emitting diodes are fabricated by using microcontactDrinted self-assembled monolayers on a gold anode (see background figure). Molecules with dipole moments in opposite directions result in an increase or a decrease of the local work function (foreground picture), providing a direct handle on charge injection and enabling local modification of the light emission

  • 47.
    Mertaniemi, Henrikki
    et al.
    Aalto University, Finland .
    Forchheimer, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Information Coding. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ikkala, Olli
    Aalto University, Finland .
    Ras, Robin H A
    Aalto University, Finland .
    Rebounding Droplet-Droplet Collisions on Superhydrophobic Surfaces: from the Phenomenon to Droplet Logic2012In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 24, no 42, 5738-5743 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When water droplets impact each other while traveling on a superhydrophobic surface, we demonstrate that they are able to rebound like billiard balls. We present elementary Boolean logic operations and a flip-flop memory based on these rebounding water droplet collisions. Furthermore, bouncing or coalescence can be easily controlled by process parameters. Thus by the controlled coalescence of reactive droplets, here using the quenching of fluorescent metal nanoclusters as a model reaction, we also demonstrate an elementary operation for programmable chemistry.

  • 48.
    Naguib, Michael
    et al.
    Drexel University.
    Kurtoglu, Murat
    Drexel University.
    Presser, Volker
    Drexel University.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Niu, Junjie
    Drexel University.
    Heon, Min
    Drexel University.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gogotsi, Yury
    Drexel University.
    Barsoum, Michel W
    Drexel University.
    Two-Dimensional Nanocrystals Produced by Exfoliation of Ti(3)AlC(2)2011In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 23, no 37, 4248-4253 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 49.
    Nilsson, David
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Chen, Miaoxiang
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kugler, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Remonen, Tommi
    ACREO Institute, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Armgarth, Mårten
    ACREO Institute, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bi-stable and dynamic current modulation in electrochemical organic transistors2002In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 14, no 1, 51-54 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Novel electrochemical transistors, based on the conductive polymer PEDOT, operating at driving voltages of only a few volts in bulk material, and with little demand on substrate planarity, are described by the authors. The underlying polymer ion pair PEDOT:PSS is conductive in both oxidized and reduced state. Two transistor architectures, a bi-stable and a dynamic transistor (the first electrochemical specimen of its kind) with an on/off ratio of 105 and 200 Hz modulation speed, were realized.

  • 50.
    Nilsson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry.
    Luminescent conjugated polymers: Illuminating the dark matters of biology and pathology2008In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 20, no 13, 2639-2645 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Novel technologies for studying biological events are of great interest and luminescent conjugated polymers (LCPs), a material normally used in organic electronics, have proven useful for the detection of a wide range of disease-related biological processes. The conformation-sensitive optical properties of LCPs provide the ability to study the biochemical activity of biological events on the basis of a structure-function relation, rather than a molecular basis. In this Research News article, the LCP technique and its usefulness for studying protein aggregation diseases are highlighted. We also discuss the much-needed illuminating insights of the underlying pathological events regarding protein aggregation diseases. In addition, essential future basic research advances that relate to further development of LCPs as molecular probes are presented. We also confer the intriguing prospect of employing amyloid fibrils, that is, a symmetric stable nanomaterial normally associated with the dark side of horrific pathology, as a scaffold for functional polymer-protein hybrid materials. © 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

12 1 - 50 of 85
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf