liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 23 of 23
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Alling, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Marten, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Abrikosov, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Questionable collapse of the bulk modulus in CrN2010In: Nature Materials, ISSN 1476-1122, E-ISSN 1476-4660, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 283-284Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this comment we show that the main conclusion in a previous article, claiminga drastic increase in compressibility of CrN at the cubic to orthorhombic phasetransition, is unsupported by first-principles calculations. We show that if thecubic CrN phase is considered as a disordered magnetic material, as supported bydifferent experimental data, rather then non-magnetic, the bulk modulus is almostunaffected by the transition.

  • 2.
    Berggren, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    Nilsson, David
    Acreo AB, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Robinson, Nathaniel D
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    Commentary: Organic materials for printed electronics: Editorial in Nature Materials, vol 6, pp 3-52007In: Nature Materials, ISSN 1476-1122, E-ISSN 1476-4660, Vol. 6, p. 3-5Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     Organic materials can offer a low-cost alternative for printed electronics and flexible displays. However, research in these systems must exploit the differences - via molecular-level control of functionality - compared with inorganic electronics if they are to become commercially viable  

  • 3.
    Berggren, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nilsson, David
    Acreo, Norrköping.
    Robinson, Nathaniel D.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Organic materials for printed electronics2007In: Nature Materials, ISSN 1476-1122, E-ISSN 1476-4660, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 3-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic materials can offer a low-cost alternative for printed electronics and flexible displays. However, research in these systems must exploit the differences — via molecular-level control of functionality — compared with inorganic electronics if they are to become commercially viable.

    Introduction

    Conducting and semiconducting organic materials, both polymers and molecules, are being considered for a vast array of electronic applications. The first examples, such as displays in mobile appliances, have found their way to market as replacements for traditional components in existing products. Organic electronics distinguishes itself from traditional electronics because one can define functionality at the molecular level, process the materials from solution, and make displays and circuits that are completely flexible. So far, very little of the uniqueness of organic electronics is expressed in the products promoted as manufacturable; why?

    One important opportunity for organic electronics is the area of radiofrequency identification (RFID) manufactured using an all-in-line printing process. This technology comprises fast-switching transistors, antennas operating at frequencies above 100 kHz, memory, and so on, all integrated into a plastic foil. The present target in many organic electronics labs around the world is to develop the high-speed (>10 kHz) transistors critical for such devices. The use of organic transistors instead of their inorganic equivalents is motivated by cost. So far, little effort has been devoted to exploring organic electronics in terms of its true unique electronic functionality and the possibility to add electronics to surfaces previously considered electronically inactive. For instance, paper is produced at speeds exceeding 100 km h-1 and is converted into packages and printed media at manufacturing flows typically above 100 m min-1. Adding organic electronics onto, for instance, the paper surface during the paper conversion process would demonstrate the true uniqueness of organic electronics, both from a manufacturing and an application point of view. Retail chains and transportation companies desperately seek a printed electronic technology to provide better safety and security features on packages and automatically track and trace products all the way from the manufacturer to the end customer. The financial losses related to counterfeiting, failure in transportation and damaged packages is comparable to the overall profits made on the product contained in the package. In addition, printed electronics could potentially guide the end-user to properly use the product and to guarantee brand authenticity, for example through an interactive user's guide, and electronic features to replace existing security devices such as the holographic stickers commonly used in packages and bank notes today. It turns out that, for many of these applications, high-frequency signal-processing is not required; 10 ms to 1 s response times are appropriate. These are goals that a very simple printed electronics technology may be able to fill. Silicon-based RFID devices are currently used in high-end products, but are prohibitively expensive for commodities such as food at the consumer package level. Thus, the potential value for printed organic electronics seems to exist if the expense can be kept down. For instance, TetraPak, who produces more than 100 billion packages every year, estimates that the costs for additional security and safety features cannot exceed about 0.2 Eurocents per package (Istvan Ulvros, TetraPak, private communication).

    Much of the research in organic electronics aims to optimise inherent charge transport and efficiency characteristics of the materials already in use in individual devices. This work has pushed the solar energy-to-electricity power-conversion efficiency in organic solar cells close to 5% (ref. 1) and the luminous efficiency of plastic luminescent devices to around 25 cd A-1 (ref. 2). Organic electrochromic displays now perform extraordinarily well in terms of colour contrast, memory and stability3, and polymer transistors easily run at speeds beyond 100 kHz (ref.4). These results have been achieved by improving the performance at the individual device level. Rarely are integrated circuits or high-volume manufacturing conditions considered in the research. Typically, a series of more than ten patterning, material deposition and post-processing steps are required to make one kind of device. The tradition has been to develop specific materials that exclusively function well in only one device type. RFID circuits (for example) typically require rectifiers, antennas, powering devices, transistors for signal processing, encapsulation layers and in some cases also displays. Merging today's efforts conducted at the organic electronics device level would then result in a production route that would include perhaps 50 (or even more) discrete manufacturing steps. Unfortunately, the cost for a label requiring several tens of patterning steps including exotic organic electronic materials is not compatible with the value and costs of packages.

    In traditional printers, typically five to ten printing stations are available in series (Fig. 1). Each station also includes one or two convection, infrared or ultraviolet curing steps. At ordinary printing speeds (10 to 200 m min-1) the substrate spends on the order of a tenth to several seconds in each printing station. During this time, registration, material deposition and post-processing must take place. The value structure in printing technology means that the cost for printing scales at least linearly with the number of printing steps. The yield and systematic errors in printing technology becomes a nightmare beyond ten printing steps. The cost for materials such as inks, substrates and coatings is a considerable part of the entire product value. Our own calculations indicate that each individual RFID label would cost more than 10 Eurocents (Lars-Olov Hennerdal, Acreo, private communication).

  • 4.
    Bubnova, Olga
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Khan, Zia Ullah
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wang, Hui
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Braun, Slawomir
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Evans, Drew R
    University of South Australia, Mawson Institute, Mawson Lakes 5095, Australia.
    Fabretto, Manrico
    University of South Australia, Mawson Institute, Mawson Lakes 5095, Australia.
    Hojati-Talemi, Pejman
    University of South Australia, Mawson Institute, Mawson Lakes 5095, Australia.
    Dagnelund, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Arlin, Jean-Baptiste
    Free University of Brussels, Laboratoire de Chimie des Polymères, CP 206/1, Boulevard du Triomphe, 1050 Bruxelles, Belgium.
    Geerts, Yves H.
    Free University of Brussels, Laboratoire de Chimie des Polymères, CP 206/1, Boulevard du Triomphe, 1050 Bruxelles, Belgium.
    Desbief, Simon
    University of Mons, Laboratoire de chimie des materiaux nouveaux, Place du Parc 20, 7000 Mons, Belgium.
    Breiby, Dag W.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Department of Physics, Høgskoleringen 5, 7491 Trondheim, Norway.
    Andreasen, Jens W.
    Technical University of Denmark, Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark.
    Lazzaroni, Roberto
    University of Mons, Laboratoire de chimie des materiaux nouveaux, Place du Parc 20, 7000 Mons, Belgium.
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zozoulenko, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Murphy, Peter J.
    University of South Australia, Mawson Institute, Mawson Lakes 5095, Australia.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Corrigendum: Semi-metallic polymers2014In: Nature Materials, ISSN 1476-1122, E-ISSN 1476-4660, Vol. 13, p. 662-662Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Bubnova, Olga
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ullah Khan, Zia
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wang, Hui
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Braun, Slawomir
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Evans, Drew R.
    University of S Australia, Australia .
    Fabretto, Manrico
    University of S Australia, Australia .
    Hojati-Talemi, Pejman
    University of S Australia, Australia .
    Dagnelund, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Arlin, Jean-Baptiste
    University of Libre Brussels, Belgium .
    Geerts, Yves H.
    University of Libre Brussels, Belgium .
    Desbief, Simon
    University of Mons, Belgium .
    Breiby, Dag W.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology NTNU, Norway .
    Andreasen, Jens W.
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark .
    Lazzaroni, Roberto
    University of Mons, Belgium .
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zozoulenko, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Murphy, Peter J.
    University of S Australia, Australia .
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Semi-metallic polymers2014In: Nature Materials, ISSN 1476-1122, E-ISSN 1476-4660, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 190-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymers are lightweight, flexible, solution-processable materials that are promising for low-cost printed electronics as well as for mass-produced and large-area applications. Previous studies demonstrated that they can possess insulating, semiconducting or metallic properties; here we report that polymers can also be semi-metallic. Semi-metals, exemplified by bismuth, graphite and telluride alloys, have no energy bandgap and a very low density of states at the Fermi level. Furthermore, they typically have a higher Seebeck coefficient and lower thermal conductivities compared with metals, thus being suitable for thermoelectric applications. We measure the thermoelectric properties of various poly( 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) samples, and observe a marked increase in the Seebeck coefficient when the electrical conductivity is enhanced through molecular organization. This initiates the transition from a Fermi glass to a semi-metal. The high Seebeck value, the metallic conductivity at room temperature and the absence of unpaired electron spins makes polymer semi-metals attractive for thermoelectrics and spintronics.

  • 6.
    Castelletto, S.
    et al.
    RMIT University, Australia .
    Johnson, B. C.
    University of Melbourne, Australia Japan Atom Energy Agency, Japan .
    Ivády, Viktor
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Stavrias, N.
    University of Melbourne, Australia .
    Umeda, T.
    University of Tsukuba, Japan .
    Gali, A.
    Hungarian Academic Science, Hungary Budapest University of Technology and Econ, Hungary .
    Ohshima, T.
    Japan Atom Energy Agency, Japan .
    A silicon carbide room-temperature single-photon source2014In: Nature Materials, ISSN 1476-1122, E-ISSN 1476-4660, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 151-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past few years, single-photon generation has been realized in numerous systems: single molecules(1), quantum dots(2-4), diamond colour centres5 and others(6). The generation and detection of single photons play a central role in the experimental foundation of quantum mechanics(7) and measurement theory(8). An efficient and high-quality single-photon source is needed to implement quantum key distribution, quantum repeaters and photonic quantum information processing(9). Here we report the identification and formation of ultrabright, room-temperature, photostable single-photon sources in a device-friendly material, silicon carbide (SiC). The source is composed of an intrinsic defect, known as the carbon antisite-vacancy pair, created by carefully optimized electron irradiation and annealing of ultrapure SiC. An extreme brightness (2 x 10(6) counts s(-1)) resulting from polarization rules and a high quantum efficiency is obtained in the bulk without resorting to the use of a cavity or plasmonic structure. This may benefit future integrated quantum photonic devices(9).

  • 7.
    Christle, David J.
    et al.
    University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA; University of Calif Santa Barbara, CA 93106 USA.
    Falk, Abram L.
    University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Andrich, Paolo
    University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA; University of Calif Santa Barbara, CA 93106 USA.
    Klimov, Paul V.
    University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA; University of Calif Santa Barbara, CA 93106 USA.
    ul-Hassan, Jawad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tien Son, Nguyen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Janzén, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ohshima, Takeshi
    Japan Atom Energy Agency, Japan.
    Awschalom, David D.
    University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA; University of Calif Santa Barbara, CA 93106 USA.
    Isolated electron spins in silicon carbide with millisecond coherence times2015In: Nature Materials, ISSN 1476-1122, E-ISSN 1476-4660, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 160-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The elimination of defects from SiC has facilitated its move to the forefront of the optoelectronics and power-electronics industries(1). Nonetheless, because certain SiC defects have electronic states with sharp optical and spin transitions, they are increasingly recognized as a platform for quantum information and nanoscale sensing(2-16). Here, we show that individual electron spins in high-purity monocrystalline 4H-SiC can be isolated and coherently controlled. Bound to neutral divacancy defects(2,3), these states exhibit exceptionally long ensemble Hahn-echo spin coherence times, exceeding 1 ms. Coherent control of single spins in a material amenable to advanced growth and microfabrication techniques is an exciting route towards wafer-scale quantum technologies.

  • 8.
    Crispin, Xavier
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kalinin, Sergei V.
    Oak Ridge National Lab, TN 37831 USA.
    Semiconducting Polymers: Probing the solid-liquid interface2017In: Nature Materials, ISSN 1476-1122, E-ISSN 1476-4660, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 704-705Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exploring the minute mechanical deformations induced by electrical bias at the interface with electrolytes allows the identification of local crystallinity and distinguishing adsorption and intercalation of ions in electroactive polymers.

  • 9.
    Fashandi, Hossein
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlqvist, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Palisaitis, Justinas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simak, Sergey
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Abrikosov, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Andersson, Mike
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Sensor Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Sensor Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Synthesis of Ti3AuC2, Ti3Au2C2 and Ti3IrC2 by noble metal substitution reaction in Ti3SiC2 for high-temperature-stable Ohmic contacts to SiC2017In: Nature Materials, ISSN 1476-1122, E-ISSN 1476-4660, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 814-818Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The large class of layered ceramics encompasses both van der Waals (vdW) and non-vdW solids. While intercalation of noble metals in vdW solids is known, formation of compounds by incorporation of noble-metal layers in non-vdW layered solids is largely unexplored. Here, we show formation of Ti3AuC2 and Ti3Au2C2 phases with up to 31% lattice swelling by a substitutional solid-state reaction of Au into Ti3SiC2 single-crystal thin films with simultaneous out-diffusion of Si. Ti3IrC2 is subsequently produced by a substitution reaction of Ir for Au in Ti3Au2C2. These phases form Ohmic electrical contacts to SiC and remain stable after 1,000 h of ageing at 600 degrees C in air. The present results, by combined analytical electron microscopy and ab initio calculations, open avenues for processing of noble-metal-containing layered ceramics that have not been synthesized from elemental sources, along with tunable properties such as stable electrical contacts for high-temperature power electronics or gas sensors.

  • 10.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Forchheimer, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Image Coding. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Towards woven logic from organic electronic fibres2007In: Nature Materials, ISSN 1476-1122, E-ISSN 1476-4660, Vol. 6, p. 357-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of organic polymers for electronic functions is mainly motivated by the low-end applications, where low cost rather than advanced performance is a driving force. Materials and processing methods must allow for cheap production. Printing of electronics using inkjets1 or classical printing methods has considerable potential to deliver this. Another technology that has been around for millennia is weaving using fibres. Integration of electronic functions within fabrics, with production methods fully compatible with textiles, is therefore of current interest, to enhance performance and extend functions of textiles2. Standard polymer field-effect transistors require well defined insulator thickness and high voltage3, so they have limited suitability for electronic textiles. Here we report a novel approach through the construction of wire electrochemical transistor (WECT) devices, and show that textile monofilaments with 10–100 µm diameters can be coated with continuous thin films of the conducting polythiophene poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), and used to create micro-scale WECTs on single fibres. We also demonstrate inverters and multiplexers for digital logic. This opens an avenue for three-dimensional polymer micro-electronics, where large-scale circuits can be designed and integrated directly into the three-dimensional structure of woven fibres.

  • 11.
    Hou, Jianhui
    et al.
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Friend, Richard H.
    Cavendish Lab, England.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Organic solar cells based on non-fullerene acceptors2018In: Nature Materials, ISSN 1476-1122, E-ISSN 1476-4660, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 119-128Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) have been dominated by donor: acceptor blends based on fullerene acceptors for over two decades. This situation has changed recently, with non-fullerene (NF) OSCs developing very quickly. The power conversion efficiencies of NF OSCs have now reached a value of over 13%, which is higher than the best fullerene-based OSCs. NF acceptors show great tunability in absorption spectra and electron energy levels, providing a wide range of new opportunities. The coexistence of low voltage losses and high current generation indicates that new regimes of device physics and photophysics are reached in these systems. This Review highlights these opportunities made possible by NF acceptors, and also discuss the challenges facing the development of NF OSCs for practical applications.

  • 12.
    Kiefer, David
    et al.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Kroon, Renee
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Hofmann, Anna I.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Sun, Hengda
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Giovannitti, Alexander
    Imperial Coll London, England; Imperial Coll London, England.
    Stegerer, Dominik
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden; Tech Univ Chemnitz, Germany.
    Cano, Alexander
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Hynynen, Jonna
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Yu, Liyang
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Zhang, Yadong
    Georgia Inst Technol, GA 30332 USA; Georgia Inst Technol, GA 30332 USA.
    Nai, Dingqi
    Univ Calif Davis, CA 95616 USA.
    Harrelson, Thomas F.
    Univ Calif Davis, CA 95616 USA.
    Sommer, Michael
    Tech Univ Chemnitz, Germany.
    Moule, Adam J.
    Univ Calif Davis, CA 95616 USA.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Marder, Seth R.
    Georgia Inst Technol, GA 30332 USA; Georgia Inst Technol, GA 30332 USA.
    McCulloch, Iain
    Imperial Coll London, England; Imperial Coll London, England; King Abdullah Univ Sci and Technol, Saudi Arabia.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fabiano, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mueller, Christian
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Double doping of conjugated polymers with monomer molecular dopants2019In: Nature Materials, ISSN 1476-1122, E-ISSN 1476-4660, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 149-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecular doping is a crucial tool for controlling the charge-carrier concentration in organic semiconductors. Each dopant molecule is commonly thought to give rise to only one polaron, leading to a maximum of one donor: acceptor charge-transfer complex and hence an ionization efficiency of 100%. However, this theoretical limit is rarely achieved because of incomplete charge transfer and the presence of unreacted dopant. Here, we establish that common p-dopants can in fact accept two electrons per molecule from conjugated polymers with a low ionization energy. Each dopant molecule participates in two charge-transfer events, leading to the formation of dopant dianions and an ionization efficiency of up to 200%. Furthermore, we show that the resulting integer charge-transfer complex can dissociate with an efficiency of up to 170%. The concept of double doping introduced here may allow the dopant fraction required to optimize charge conduction to be halved.

  • 13.
    Luo, Yongkang
    et al.
    Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China; Princeton University, New Jersey, USA.
    Pourovskii, Leonid
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, CNRS, Palaiseau Cedex, France .
    Rowley, S. E.
    Princeton University, NJ, USA .
    Li, Yuke
    Hangzhou Normal University, China .
    Feng, Chunmu
    Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.
    Georges, Antoine
    École Polytechnique, CNRS, Palaiseau Cedex, France.
    Dai, Jianhui
    Hangzhou Normal University, China .
    Cao, Guanghan
    Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.
    Xu, Zhuan
    Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China .
    Si, Qimiao
    Rice University, TX, USA .
    Ong, N. P.
    Princeton University, New Jersey, USA.
    Heavy-fermion quantum criticality and destruction of the Kondo effect in a nickel oxypnictide2014In: Nature Materials, ISSN 1476-1122, E-ISSN 1476-4660, Vol. 13, no 8, p. 777-781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A quantum critical point arises at a continuous transformation between distinct phases of matter at zero temperature. Studies in antiferromagnetic heavy-fermion materials have revealed that quantum criticality has several classes, with an unconventional type that involves a critical destruction of the Kondo entanglement(1,2). To understand such varieties, it is important to extend the materials basis beyond the usual setting of intermetallic compounds. Here we show that a nickel oxypnictide, CeNiAsO, exhibits a heavy-fermion antiferromagnetic quantum critical point as a function of either pressure or P/As substitution. At the quantum critical point, non-Fermi-liquid behaviour appears, which is accompanied by a divergent effective carrier mass. Across the quantum critical point, the low-temperature Hall coefficient undergoes a rapid sign change, suggesting a sudden jump of the Fermi surface and a destruction of the Kondo effect(3,4). Our results imply that the enormous materials basis for the oxypnictides, which has been so crucial in the search for high-temperature superconductivity, will also play a vital role in the effort to establish the universality classes of quantum criticality in strongly correlated electron systems.

  • 14.
    Matyba, Piotr
    et al.
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Maturova, Klara
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Robinson, Nathaniel D
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Edman, Ludvig
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    The dynamic organic p-n junction2009In: Nature Materials, ISSN 1476-1122, E-ISSN 1476-4660, Vol. 8, no 8, p. 672-676Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Static p-n junctions in inorganic semiconductors are exploited in a wide range of todays electronic appliances. Here, we demonstrate the in situ formation of a dynamic p-n junction structure within an organic semiconductor through electrochemistry. Specifically, we use scanning kelvin probe microscopy and optical probing on planar light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) with a mixture of a conjugated polymer and an electrolyte connecting two electrodes separated by 120 mu m. We find that a significant portion of the potential drop between the electrodes coincides with the location of a thin and distinct light-emission zone positioned andgt;30 mu m away from the negative electrode. These results are relevant in the context of a long-standing scientific debate, as they prove that electrochemical doping can take place in LECs. Moreover, a study on the doping formation and dissipation kinetics provides interesting detail regarding the electronic structure and stability of the dynamic organic p-n junction, which may be useful in future dynamic p-n junction-based devices.

  • 15.
    Nilsson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Chip and solution detection of DNA hybridization using a luminescent zwitterionic polythiophene derivative2003In: Nature Materials, ISSN 1476-1122, E-ISSN 1476-4660, Vol. 2, no 6, p. 419-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electronic polymers in aqueous media may offer bioelectronic detection of biospecific interactions. Here we report a fluorometric DNA hybridization detection method based on non-covalent coupling of DNA to a water-soluble zwitterionic polythiophene derivative. Introduction of a single-stranded oligonucleotide will induce a planar polymer and aggregation of the polymer chains, detected as a decrease of the intensity and a red-shift of the fluorescence. On addition of a complementary oligonucleotide, the intensity of the emitted light is increased and blue-shifted. The detection limit of this method is at present ~10−11 moles. The method is highly sequence specific, and a single-nucleotide mismatch can be detected within five minutes without using any denaturation steps. The interaction with DNA and the optical phenomena persists when the polymer is deposited and patterned on a surface. This offers a novel way to create DNA chips without using covalent attachment of the receptor or labelling of the analyte.

  • 16.
    Ojamäe, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    CRYSTALLINE ICE Amorphous on the surface2011In: Nature Materials, ISSN 1476-1122, E-ISSN 1476-4660, Vol. 10, no 10, p. 725-726Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Crystalline ice surfaces are found to exhibit an unusually large spread of vacancy formation energies, akin to an amorphous material. The finding has implications for the fundamental understanding of electrostatically frustrated surfaces and for the reactivity and catalytic properties of atmospheric ice. Watkins et al. have found that even for a perfect ice surface, a clean-cut surface where the oxygen atoms are ordered in a hexagonal lattice, the energy needed to form a vacancy varies greatly depending on the water molecule removed. They found that at interfaces, nearest-neighbor water molecules cannot satisfy all hydrogen bonds, and thus some of the molecules exhibit dangling OH bonds. The findings of Watkins and co-authors imply that ice may possess more surface vacancies than expected. The ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of model ice surfaces show that surface molecules can be thermally activated below the model's melting point to form vacancies and adsorbed molecules at the surface.

  • 17.
    Qian, Deping
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zheng, Zilong
    Georgia Inst Technol, GA 30332 USA; Georgia Inst Technol, GA 30332 USA.
    Yao, Huifeng
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Tress, Wolfgang
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Hopper, Thomas R.
    Imperial Coll London, England.
    Chen, Shula
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Li, Sunsun
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Jing
    Hong Kong Univ Sci and Technol, Peoples R China; Hong Kong Univ Sci and Technol, Peoples R China.
    Chen, Shangshang
    Hong Kong Univ Sci and Technol, Peoples R China; Hong Kong Univ Sci and Technol, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Jiangbin
    Imperial Coll London, England; Univ Cambridge, England.
    Liu, Xiaoke
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gao, Bowei
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jin, Yingzhi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pozina, Galia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Buyanova, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Coropceanu, Veaceslav
    Georgia Inst Technol, GA 30332 USA; Georgia Inst Technol, GA 30332 USA.
    Bredas, Jean-Luc
    Georgia Inst Technol, GA 30332 USA; Georgia Inst Technol, GA 30332 USA.
    Yan, He
    Hong Kong Univ Sci and Technol, Peoples R China; Hong Kong Univ Sci and Technol, Peoples R China.
    Hou, Jianhui
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Fengling
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bakulin, Artem A.
    Imperial Coll London, England.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Design rules for minimizing voltage losses in high-efficiency organic solar cells2018In: Nature Materials, ISSN 1476-1122, E-ISSN 1476-4660, Vol. 17, no 8, p. 703-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The open-circuit voltage of organic solar cells is usually lower than the values achieved in inorganic or perovskite photovoltaic devices with comparable bandgaps. Energy losses during charge separation at the donor-acceptor interface and non-radiative recombination are among the main causes of such voltage losses. Here we combine spectroscopic and quantum-chemistry approaches to identify key rules for minimizing voltage losses: (1) a low energy offset between donor and acceptor molecular states and (2) high photoluminescence yield of the low-gap material in the blend. Following these rules, we present a range of existing and new donor-acceptor systems that combine efficient photocurrent generation with electroluminescence yield up to 0.03%, leading to non-radiative voltage losses as small as 0.21 V. This study provides a rationale to explain and further improve the performance of recently demonstrated high-open-circuit-voltage organic solar cells.

  • 18.
    Roeling, Erik M.
    et al.
    ;.
    Chr Germs, Wijnand
    Smalbrugge, Barry
    Geluk, Erik Jan
    de Vries, Tjibbe
    Janssen, Rene A. J.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Correction: Organic electronic ratchets doing work (vol 10, pg 51, 2011)2011In: Nature Materials, ISSN 1476-1122, E-ISSN 1476-4660, Vol. 10, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 19.
    Roeling, Erik M.
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Germs, Wijnand Chr.
    [Roeling, Netherlands.
    Smalbrugge, Barry
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Jan Geluk, Erik
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    de Vries, Tjibbe
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Janssen, Rene A. J.
    [Roeling, Netherlands.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    [Roeling, Netherlands.
    Organic electronic ratchets doing work2011In: Nature Materials, ISSN 1476-1122, E-ISSN 1476-4660, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 51-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possibility to extract work from periodic, undirected forces has intrigued scientists for over a century-in particular, the rectification of undirected motion of particles by ratchet potentials, which are periodic but asymmetric functions. Introduced by Smoluchowski and Feynman(1,2) to study the (dis)ability to generate motion from an equilibrium situation, ratchets operate out of equilibrium, where the second law of thermodynamics no longer applies. Although ratchet systems have been both identified in nature(3,4) and used in the laboratory for the directed motion of microscopic objects(5-9), electronic ratchets(10-13) have been of limited use, as they typically operate at cryogenic temperatures and generate subnanoampere currents and submillivolt voltages(10-14). Here, we present organic electronic ratchets that operate up to radio frequencies at room temperature and generate currents and voltages that are orders of magnitude larger. This enables their use as a d.c. power source. We integrated the ratchets into logic circuits, in which they act as the d.c. equivalent of the a. c. transformer, and generate enough power to drive the circuitry. Our findings show that electronic ratchets may be of actual use.

  • 20.
    Simon, Daniel T
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kurup, Sindhulakshmi
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Larsson, Karin C
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Hori, Ryusuke
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Tybrandt, Klas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Goiny, Michel
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Jager, Edwin W H
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Canlon, Barbara
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Organic electronics for precise delivery of neurotransmitters to modulate mammalian sensory function.2009In: Nature Materials, ISSN 1476-1122, E-ISSN 1476-4660, Vol. 8, no 9, p. 742-746Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Significant advances have been made in the understanding of the pathophysiology, molecular targets and therapies for the treatment of a variety of nervous-system disorders. Particular therapies involve electrical sensing and stimulation of neural activity, and significant effort has therefore been devoted to the refinement of neural electrodes. However, direct electrical interfacing suffers from some inherent problems, such as the inability to discriminate amongst cell types. Thus, there is a need for novel devices to specifically interface nerve cells. Here, we demonstrate an organic electronic device capable of precisely delivering neurotransmitters in vitro and in vivo. In converting electronic addressing into delivery of neurotransmitters, the device mimics the nerve synapse. Using the peripheral auditory system, we show that out of a diverse population of cells, the device can selectively stimulate nerve cells responding to a specific neurotransmitter. This is achieved by precise electronic control of electrophoretic migration through a polymer film. This mechanism provides several sought-after features for regulation of cell signalling: exact dosage determination through electrochemical relationships, minimally disruptive delivery due to lack of fluid flow, and on-off switching. This technology has great potential as a therapeutic platform and could help accelerate the development of therapeutic strategies for nervous-system disorders.

  • 21.
    Wang, Xingjun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Buyanova, Irina A
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zhao, F
    Université de Toulouse.
    Lagarde, D
    Université de Toulouse.
    Balocchi, A
    Université de Toulouse.
    Marie, X
    Université de Toulouse.
    Tu, C W
    University of California.
    Harmand, J C
    LPN, France.
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Room-temperature defect-engineered spin filter based on a non-magnetic semiconductor.2009In: Nature Materials, ISSN 1476-1122, E-ISSN 1476-4660, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 198-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Generating, manipulating and detecting electron spin polarization and coherence at room temperature is at the heart of future spintronics and spin-based quantum information technology. Spin filtering, which is a key issue for spintronic applications, has been demonstrated by using ferromagnetic metals, diluted magnetic semiconductors, quantum point contacts, quantum dots, carbon nanotubes, multiferroics and so on. This filtering effect was so far restricted to a limited efficiency and primarily at low temperatures or under a magnetic field. Here, we provide direct and unambiguous experimental proof that an electron-spin-polarized defect, such as a Ga(i) self-interstitial in dilute nitride GaNAs, can effectively deplete conduction electrons with an opposite spin orientation and can thus turn the non-magnetic semiconductor into an efficient spin filter operating at room temperature and zero magnetic field. This work shows the potential of such defect-engineered, switchable spin filters as an attractive alternative to generate, amplify and detect electron spin polarization at room temperature without a magnetic material or external magnetic fields.

  • 22.
    Widmann, Matthias
    et al.
    University of Stuttgart, Germany; University of Stuttgart, Germany.
    Lee, Sang-Yun
    University of Stuttgart, Germany; University of Stuttgart, Germany.
    Rendler, Torsten
    University of Stuttgart, Germany; University of Stuttgart, Germany.
    Tien Son, Nguyen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fedder, Helmut
    University of Stuttgart, Germany; University of Stuttgart, Germany.
    Paik, Seoyoung
    University of Stuttgart, Germany; University of Stuttgart, Germany.
    Yang, Li-Ping
    Beijing Computat Science Research Centre, Peoples R China.
    Zhao, Nan
    Beijing Computat Science Research Centre, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Sen
    University of Stuttgart, Germany.
    Booker, Ian Don
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Denisenko, Andrej
    University of Stuttgart, Germany; University of Stuttgart, Germany.
    Jamali, Mohammad
    University of Stuttgart, Germany; University of Stuttgart, Germany.
    Ali Momenzadeh, S.
    University of Stuttgart, Germany; University of Stuttgart, Germany.
    Gerhardt, Ilja
    University of Stuttgart, Germany; University of Stuttgart, Germany.
    Ohshima, Takeshi
    Japan Atom Energy Agency, Japan.
    Gali, Adam
    Hungarian Academic Science, Hungary; Budapest University of Technology and Econ, Hungary.
    Janzén, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wrachtrup, Joerg
    University of Stuttgart, Germany; University of Stuttgart, Germany.
    Coherent control of single spins in silicon carbide at room temperature2015In: Nature Materials, ISSN 1476-1122, E-ISSN 1476-4660, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 164-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spins in solids are cornerstone elements of quantum spintronics(1). Leading contenders such as defects in diamond(2-5) or individual phosphorus dopants in silicon(6) have shown spectacular progress, but either lack established nanotechnology or an efficient spin/photon interface. Silicon carbide (SiC) combines the strength of both systems(5):it has a large bandgap with deep defects(7-9) and benefits from mature fabrication techniques(10-12). Here, we report the characterization of photoluminescence and optical spin polarization from single silicon vacancies in SiC, and demonstrate that single spins can be addressed at room temperature. We show coherent control of a single defect spin and find long spin coherence times under ambient conditions. Our study provides evidence that SiC is a promising system for atomic-scale spintronics and quantum technology.

  • 23.
    Zuo, Guangzheng
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Linares, Mathieu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Upreti, Tanvi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    General rule for the energy of water-induced traps in organic semiconductors2019In: Nature Materials, ISSN 1476-1122, E-ISSN 1476-4660, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 588-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Charge carrier traps are generally highly detrimental for the performance of semiconductor devices. Unlike the situation for inorganic semiconductors, detailed knowledge about the characteristics and causes of traps in organic semiconductors is still very limited. Here, we accurately determine hole and electron trap energies for a wide range of organic semiconductors in thin-film form. We find that electron and hole trap energies follow a similar empirical rule and lie similar to 0.3-0.4 eV above the highest occupied molecular orbital and below the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, respectively. Combining experimental and theoretical methods, the origin of the traps is shown to be a dielectric effect of water penetrating nanovoids in the organic semiconductor thin film. We also propose a solvent-annealing method to remove water-related traps from the materials investigated, irrespective of their energy levels. These findings represent a step towards the realization of trap-free organic semiconductor thin films.

1 - 23 of 23
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf