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  • 1.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Bergbäck, Bo
    Tema V LIU.
    Lohm, Ulrik
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Flow and distribution of chormium in the swedish environment: A new approach to studying environmental pollution1989In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 18, p. 216-220Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Angelstam, Per
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skinnskatteberg, Sweden .
    Roberge, Jean-Michel
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden .
    Axelsson, Robert
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skinnskatteberg, Sweden .
    Elbakidze, Marine
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skinnskatteberg, Sweden .
    Bergman, Karl-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dahlberg, Anders
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Degerman, Erik
    Institute of Freshwater Research, Örebro, Sweden .
    Eggers, Sönke
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Essen, Per-Anders
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Hjältén, Joakim
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden .
    Johansson, Therese
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden .
    Müller, Jörg
    National Park Bavarian Forest, Grafenau, Germany.
    Paltto, Heidi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Snäll, Tord
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Solovity, Ihor
    Ukrainian National Forestry University, Lviv, Ukraine .
    Törnblom, Johan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skinnskatteberg, Sweden .
    Evidence-Based Knowledge Versus Negotiated Indicators for Assessment of Ecological Sustainability: The Swedish Forest Stewardship Council Standard as a Case Study2013In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 229-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessing ecological sustainability involves monitoring of indicators and comparison of their states with performance targets that are deemed sustainable. First, a normative model was developed centered on evidence-based knowledge about (a) forest composition, structure, and function at multiple scales, and (b) performance targets derived by quantifying the habitat amount in naturally dynamic forests, and as required for presence of populations of specialized focal species. Second, we compared the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certification standards’ ecological indicators from 1998 and 2010 in Sweden to the normative model using a Specific, Measurable, Accurate, Realistic, and Timebound (SMART) indicator approach. Indicator variables and targets for riparian and aquatic ecosystems were clearly under-represented compared to terrestrial ones. FSC’s ecological indicators expanded over time from composition and structure towards function, and from finer to coarser spatial scales. However, SMART indicators were few. Moreover, they poorly reflected quantitative evidence-based knowledge, a consequence of the fact that forest certification mirrors the outcome of a complex social negotiation process.

  • 3.
    Arheimer, Berit
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahné, Joel
    SMHI.
    Donnelly, Chantal
    SMHI.
    Climate change impact on riverine nutrient load and land-based remedial measures of the Baltic sea action plan.2012In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 600-612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To reduce eutrophication of the Baltic Sea, all nine surrounding countries have agreed upon reduction targets in the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP). Yet, monitoring sites and model concepts for decision support are few. To provide one more tool for analysis of water and nutrient fluxes in the Baltic Sea basin, the HYPE model has been applied to the region (called Balt-HYPE). It was used here for experimenting with land-based remedial measures and future climate projections to quantify the impacts of these on water and nutrient loads to the sea. The results suggest that there is a possibility to reach the BSAP nutrient reduction targets by 2100, and that climate change may both aggravate and help in some aspects. Uncertainties in the model results are large, mainly due to the spread of the climate model projections, but also due to the hydrological model.

  • 4.
    Arheimer, Berit
    et al.
    SMHI.
    Löwgren, Marianne
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Pers, Charlotta
    SMHI.
    Rosberg, Jörgen
    SMHI.
    Integrated catchment modeling for nutrient reduction: Scenarios showing impacts, potential, and cost of measures2005In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 513-520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A hydrological-based model (HBV-NP) was applied to a catchment (1900 km2) in the southern part of Sweden. Careful characterization of the present load situation and the potential for improved treatment or reduced soil leaching were analyzed. Several scenarios were modeled to find strategies to reach the Swedish environmental goals of reducing anthropogenic nitrogen load by 30% and phosphorus load by 20%. It was stated that the goals could be reached by different approaches that would affect different polluters and social sectors. However, no single measure was enough by itself. Instead, a combination of measures was necessary to achieve the goals. The nitrogen goal was the most difficult to attain. In order to be cost-effective, these measures should be applied to areas contributing the most to the net loading of the sea. This strategy could reduce the costs by 70%-80% when compared with implementing the measures in the entire catchment. Integrated catchment models may thus be helpful tools for reducing costs in environmental control programs. © Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences 2005.

  • 5.
    Axelsson, Robert
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skinnskatteberg, Sweden.
    Angelstam, Per
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skinnskatteberg, Sweden.
    Myhrman, Lennart
    Foundation Säfsen Forests, Skinnskatteberg, Sweden .
    Sädbom, Stefan
    Bergskraft Bergslagen Economic Association, Kopparberg, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Milis
    Avjord Corporation, Fjugesta, Sweden.
    Elbakidze, Marine
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skinnskatteberg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Kenneth
    Swedish Forest Agency, Dala-Järna, Sweden.
    Cupa, Petr
    Lower Morava Biosphere Reserve, Breclav, Czech Republic.
    Diry, Christian
    Biosphärenpark Wienerwald Management GmbH, Tullnerbach, Austria.
    Doyon, Frederic
    Université du Québec en Outaouais, Ripon, Canada.
    Drotz, Marcus K.
    The Lake Vänern Museum of Natural and Cultural History (Vänermuseet), Lidköping, Sweden .
    Hjorth, Arne
    Skinnskatteberg Municipality, Sweden.
    Hermansson, Jan Olof
    Ludvika Municipality, Sweden.
    Kullberg, Thomas
    Lekeberg Municipality, Fjugesta, Sweden.
    Lickers, F. Henry
    Akwesasne Task Force on the Environment, Hogansburg, NY, USA..
    McTaggart, Johanna
    Biosfärkontoret, Mariestad, Sweden.
    Olsson, Anders
    Teatermaskinen, Skräppbo Skola, Riddarhyttan, Sweden.
    Pautov, Yurij
    Silver Taiga Foundation, Syktyvkar, Komi Republic, Russia.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Apel-FoU, Örebro, Sweden.
    Törnblom, Johan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skinnskatteberg, Sweden.
    Evaluation of Multi-level Social Learning for Sustainable Landscapes: Perspective of a Development Initiative in Bergslagen, Sweden2013In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 241-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To implement policies about sustainable landscapes and rural development necessitates social learning about states and trends of sustainability indicators, norms that define sustainability, and adaptive multi-level governance. We evaluate the extent to which social learning at multiple governance levels for sustainable landscapes occur in 18 local development initiatives in the network of Sustainable Bergslagen in Sweden. We mapped activities over time, and interviewed key actors in the network about social learning. While activities resulted in exchange of experiences and some local solutions, a major challenge was to secure systematic social learning and make new knowledge explicit at multiple levels. None of the development initiatives used a systematic approach to secure social learning, and sustainability assessments were not made systematically. We discuss how social learning can be improved, and how a learning network of development initiatives could be realized.

  • 6.
    Bergbäck, Bo
    et al.
    Högskolan i Kalmar.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Lunds universitet.
    Lohm, Ulrik
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lead load: Historical pattern of lead use in Sweden1992In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 21, p. 159-165Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bishop, Kevin
    et al.
    Swedish University Agriculture Science, Sweden.
    Beven, Keith
    Swedish University Agriculture Science.
    Destouni, Georgia
    Swedish University Agriculture Science.
    Abrahamsson, Katarina
    Gothenburg University.
    Andersson, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnson, Richard K
    Swedish University Agriculture Science.
    Rodhe, Johan
    Gothenburg University.
    Hjerdt, Niclas
    Swedish Meteorological & Hydrological Institute.
    Nature as the "Natural" Goal for Water Management: A Conversation2009In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 209-214Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The goals for water-quality and ecosystem integrity are often defined relative to "natural" reference conditions in many water-management systems, including the European Union Water Framework Directive. This paper examines the difficulties created for water management by using "natural" as the goal. These difficulties are articulated from different perspectives in an informal (fictional) conversation that takes place after a workshop on reference conditions in water-resources management. The difficulties include defining the natural state and modeling how a system might be progressed toward the natural, as well as the feasibility and desirability of restoring a natural state. The paper also considers the appropriateness for developing countries to adopt the use of natural as the goal for water management. We conclude that failure to critically examine the complexities of having "natural" as the goal will compromise the ability to manage the issues that arise in real basins by not making the ambiguities associated with this "natural" goal explicit. This is unfortunate both for the western world that has embraced this model of "natural as the goal" and for the developing world in so far as they are encouraged to adopt this model.

  • 8.
    Callaghan, Terry V.
    et al.
    Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Tweedie, Craig E.
    University of Texas at El Paso, USA .
    Åkerman, Jonas
    Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Andrews, Christopher
    Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Penicuik, UK .
    Bergstedt, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Ecology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Butler, Malcolm G.
    North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, USA .
    Christensen, Torben R.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Cooley, Dorothy
    Department of Environment, Yukon Territorial Government, Dawson City, YT, Canada.
    Dahlberg, Ulrika
    Lantmäteriet, Gävle, Sweden .
    Danby, Ryan K.
    Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada.
    Daniëls, Fred J. A.
    Institute of Biology and Biotechnology of Plants, Münster, Germany .
    de Molenaar, Johannes G.
    Maurik, The Netherlands .
    Dick, Jan
    Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Penicuik, UK .
    Mortensen, Ebbe
    Alterra, Wageningen University, The Netherlands .
    Ebert-May, Diane
    Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA .
    Emanuelsson, Urban
    Swedish Biodiversity Centre, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Hedenås, Henrik
    Abisko Scientific Research Station, Sweden.
    Henry, Greg. H. R.
    University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada .
    Hik, David S.
    University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada .
    Hobbie, John E.
    Ecosystems Center, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA, USA.
    Jantze, Elin J.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Jaspers, Cornelia
    DTU Aqua, Charlottenlund, Denmark .
    Johansson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Johansson, Margareta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Johnson, David R.
    University of Texas at El Paso, USA .
    Johnstone, Jill F.
    University of Saskatchewan, Canada.
    Jonasson, Christer
    Abisko Scientific Research Station, Sweden.
    Kennedy,, Catherine
    Department of Environment, Yukon Territorial Government, Whitehorse, YT, Canada .
    Kenney, Alice J.
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada .
    Keuper, Frida
    VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Koh, Saewan
    University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada .
    Krebs, Charles J.
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada .
    Lantuit, Hugues
    Alfred Wegener Institute, Potsdam, Germany .
    Lara, Mark J.
    University of Texas at El Paso, USA .
    Lin, David
    University of Texas at El Paso, USA .
    Lougheed, Vanessa L.
    University of Texas at El Paso, USA .
    Madsen, Jesper
    Aarhus University, Roskilde, Denmark .
    Matveyeva, Nadya
    Department of Vegetation of the Far North, Komarov Botanical Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia .
    McEwen, Daniel C.
    Minnesota State University, Moorhead, MN, USA .
    Myers-Smith, Isla H.
    University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada .
    Narozhniy, Yuriy K.
    Tomsk State University, Russia .
    Olsson, Håkan
    Swedish university of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden .
    Pohjola, Veijo A.
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Price, Larry W.
    Portland State University, OR, USA .
    Rigét, Frank
    Minnesota State University, Moorhead, MN, USA .
    Rundqvist, Sara
    Umeå Univerity, Sweden .
    Sandström, Anneli
    Gävle, Sweden .
    Tamstorf, Mikkel
    Minnesota State University, Moorhead, MN, USA .
    Van Bogaert, Rik
    Flanders Research Foundation, Brussels, Belgium .
    Villarreal, Sandra
    University of Texas at El Paso, USA .
    Webber, Patrick J.
    Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA .
    Zemtsov, Valeriy A.
    Tomsk State University, Russia.
    Multi-Decadal Changes in Tundra Environments and Ecosystems: Synthesis of the International Polar Year-Back to the FutureProject (IPY-BTF)2011In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 705-716Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the responses of tundra systemsto global change has global implications. Most tundraregions lack sustained environmental monitoring and oneof the only ways to document multi-decadal change is toresample historic research sites. The International PolarYear (IPY) provided a unique opportunity for such researchthrough the Back to the Future (BTF) project (IPY project#512). This article synthesizes the results from 13 paperswithin this Ambio Special Issue. Abiotic changes includeglacial recession in the Altai Mountains, Russia; increasedsnow depth and hardness, permafrost warming, andincreased growing season length in sub-arctic Sweden;drying of ponds in Greenland; increased nutrient availabilityin Alaskan tundra ponds, and warming at mostlocations studied. Biotic changes ranged from relativelyminor plant community change at two sites in Greenland tomoderate change in the Yukon, and to dramatic increasesin shrub and tree density on Herschel Island, and in subarcticSweden. The population of geese tripled at one sitein northeast Greenland where biomass in non-grazed plotsdoubled. A model parameterized using results from a BTFstudy forecasts substantial declines in all snowbeds andincreases in shrub tundra on Niwot Ridge, Colorado overthe next century. In general, results support and provideimproved capacities for validating experimental manipulation,remote sensing, and modeling studies.

  • 9.
    Castensson, Reinhold
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wittgren, Hans B
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gipperth, Lena
    Göteborg university.
    Joelsson, Arne
    Counyt Council, Halland.
    Castensson, Reinhold
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Jonasson, Lars
    AgrDr Haraldsmåla.
    Thunvik, Roger
    Dept of Land and Water Resources Royal Institute of Technology.
    Thorstensson, Gunnar
    Dept of Water Quality Management Univ. of Agricultural Sciences.
    An Actor Game on Implementation of Environmental Quality Standards for Nitrogen in a Swedish Agricultural Catchment2005In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 237-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite politcal efforts, diffuse pollution from agiculture continues to be the single largest socuce of nitogen (N) emissions. The results from the study indicate that it is possible without economic losses to drastically reduce the nitrogene emissions. At actor game was shown to be be a good method for learning about Swedish Environmental Code and its implications on nitrogen emissions.

  • 10.
    Collentine, Dennis
    et al.
    Gävle University.
    Galaz, Victor
    Stockholm University.
    Kallner Bastviken, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Ecology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Stahl-Delbanco, Annika
    Lund University.
    CATCH: A method for structured discussions and a tool for decision support2005In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 579-580Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 11.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rapid Population Increase: A Development Trap. A Study of a Social Sector Development in Rural Tanzania1994In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 23, no 4-5, p. 309-311Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Geranmayeh, Pia
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Sweden.
    Johannesson, Karin M.
    Swedish National Forens Centre, S-58194 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Ulen, Barbro
    Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Sweden.
    Tonderski, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Particle deposition, resuspension and phosphorus accumulation in small constructed wetlands2018In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 47, p. 134-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To improve understanding of phosphorus (P) retention processes in small constructed wetlands (CWs), we analysed variations in sediment deposition and accumulation in four CWs on clay soils in east-central Sweden. Sediment deposition (in traps) generally exceeded the total suspended solids (TSS) load suggesting that resuspension and wetland base erosion were important. This was confirmed by quantification of particle accumulation (on plates) (1-23 kg m(-2) year(-1)), which amounted to only 13-23% of trap deposition. Spatial mean P concentrations in accumulated sediment on plates (0.09-0.15%) were generally similar to temporal mean P concentrations of particles in water (0.11-0.15%). Deposition/accumulation was minor in one wetland with high hydraulic load (400 m year(-1)), suggesting that such small wetlands are not efficient as particle sinks. Economic support for CWs are given, but design and landscape position are here demonstrated to be important for effective P retention.

  • 13.
    Glaas, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Storbjörk, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Schmid Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Bohman, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Muthumanickam, Prithiviraj
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Developing transformative capacity through systematic assessments and visualization of urban climate transitions2019In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 515-528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transforming cities into low-carbon, resilient, and sustainable places will require action encompassing most segments of society. However, local governments struggle to overview and assess all ongoing climate activities in a city, constraining well-informed decision-making and transformative capacity. This paper proposes and tests an assessment framework developed to visualize the implementation of urban climate transition (UCT). Integrating key transition activities and process progression, the framework was applied to three Swedish cities. Climate coordinators and municipal councillors evaluated the visual UCT representations. Results indicate that their understanding of UCT actions and implementation bottlenecks became clearer, making transition more governable. To facilitate UCT, involving external actors and shifting priorities between areas were found to be key. The visual UCT representations improved system awareness and memory, building local transformative capacity. The study recommends systematic assessment and visualization of process progression as a promising method to facilitate UCT governance, but potentially also broader sustainability transitions.

  • 14.
    Grennfelt, Peringe
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environm Research Institute, Sverige .
    Kjellen, Bo
    Stockholm Environm Institute, Sverige.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zetterberg, Lars
    IVL Swedish Environm Research Institute, Sverige.
    Socio-Economic Research in Support of Climate Policy Development: Mistras Research Program Clipore2012In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mistras Climate Policy Research Program, Clipore, is one of the largest research programs directed to support international climate policy development, involving research groups in Sweden, Norway, United States and India. It has been running from 2004 to 2011 with a budget of more than 100 MSEK (15 M USD). The paper briefly describes the program and its outcomes in relation to climate policy development. Discussion focuses on how the program has been able to be in the front of and include the development of emissions trading systems in Europe and the United States and how the program has been able to follow and produce inputs to the agenda of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The paper also discusses how the program has managed to present its outcomes and maintain an active dialogue with the various stakeholders. The paper emphasises options and obstacles in the communication between science and policy.

  • 15.
    Hedenas, Henrik
    et al.
    Abisko Science Research Stn.
    Olsson, Hakan
    Swedish University of Agriculture Science.
    Jonasson, Christer
    Abisko Science Research Stn.
    Bergstedt, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Ecology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dahlberg, Ulrika
    Royal Swedish Academic Science.
    Changes in Tree Growth, Biomass and Vegetation Over a 13-Year Period in the Swedish Sub-Arctic2011In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 672-682Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was conducted in the Swedish sub-Arctic, near Abisko, in order to assess the direction and scale of possible vegetation changes in the alpine-birch forest ecotone. We have re-surveyed shrub, tree and vegetation data at 549 plots grouped into 61 clusters. The plots were originally surveyed in 1997 and re-surveyed in 2010. Our study is unique for the area as we have quantitatively estimated a 19% increase in tree biomass mainly within the existing birch forest. We also found significant increases in the cover of two vegetation types-"birch forest-heath with mosses and "meadow with low herbs, while the cover of snowbed vegetation decreased significantly. The vegetation changes might be caused by climate, herbivory and past human impact but irrespective of the causes, the observed transition of the vegetation will have substantial effects on the mountain ecosystems.

  • 16.
    Humborg, C.
    et al.
    SU.
    Conley, D.
    DMU.
    Rahm, Lars
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wulff, F.
    SU.
    Cociasu, A.
    Ittekot, V.
    University of Bremen.
    Silicon retention in river basins: Far-reaching effects on biogeochemistry and aquatic food webs in coastal marine environments2000In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 45-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regulation of rivers by damming as well as eutrophication in river basins has substantially reduced dissolved silicon (DSi) loads to the Black Sea and the Baltic Sea. Whereas removal of N and P in lakes and reservoirs can be compensated for by anthropogenic inputs in the drainage basins, no such compensation occurs for DSi. The resulting changes in the nutrient composition (DSi:N:P ratio) of river discharges seem to be responsible for dramatic shifts in phytoplankton species composition in the Black Sea. In the Baltic Sea, DSi concentrations and the DSi:N ratio have been decreasing since the end of the 1960s, and there are indications that the proportion of diatoms in the spring bloom has decreased while flagellates have increased. The effects on coastal biogeochemical cycles and food web structure observed in the Black Sea and the Baltic Sea may be far reaching, because it appears that the reductions in DSi delivery by rivers are probably occurring worldwide with the ever increasing construction of dams for flow regulation.

  • 17.
    Inganäs, Olle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sundström, V
    Chemical Physics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Solar energy for electricity and fuels.2016In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 45 (Suppl 1), p. S15-S23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Solar energy conversion into electricity by photovoltaic modules is now a mature technology. We discuss the need for materials and device developments using conventional silicon and other materials, pointing to the need to use scalable materials and to reduce the energy payback time. Storage of solar energy can be achieved using the energy of light to produce a fuel. We discuss how this can be achieved in a direct process mimicking the photosynthetic processes, using synthetic organic, inorganic, or hybrid materials for light collection and catalysis. We also briefly discuss challenges and needs for large-scale implementation of direct solar fuel technologies.

  • 18.
    Inganäs, Olle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zhang, Fengling
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats R
    Chalmers, Sweden .
    Alternating Copolymers and Alternative Device Geometries for Organic Photovoltaics2012In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 41, p. 138-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The efficiency of conversion of light to electrical energy with the help of conjugated polymers and molecules is rapidly improving. The optical absorption properties of these materials can be designed, and implemented via molecular engineering. Full coverage of the solar spectrum is thus feasible. Narrow absorption spectra allow construction of tandem solar cells. The poor transport properties of these materials require thin devices, which limits optical absorption. Alternative device geometries for these flexible materials compensate for the optical absorption by light trapping, and allow tandem cells.

  • 19.
    Jensen, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Zoology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Leif
    Animal genetics Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Genomics Meets Ethology: A New Route to Understanding Domestication, Behavior, and Sustainability in Animal Breeding2005In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 34, p. 320-324Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Jonsson, Anna
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Public participation in water resources management: Stakeholder voices on degree, scale, potential, and methods in future water management2005In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 495-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Water Framework Directive puts strong emphasis on stakeholder and public participation in water management. Several practical questions regarding who should be involved, why, when, and how still remain unanswered. This paper investigates stakeholders' own experiences and views of increased public participation in water management. The article also explores the potential for increasing levels of participation by forming catchment committees with representation from stakeholder groups and through the use of various practical methods for participation. For both these aspects of participation, the views, expectations, and apprehensions of different stakeholder groups involved in nutrient loss management are investigated. Stakeholder opinions were collected by inviting representatives from five stakeholder groups within the Rönneå catchment in southern Sweden to a catchment dialog process.

  • 21.
    Jonsson, Anna
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Public particiption in water resources management - stakeholder voices on degree, scale, potential and methods in future water management2005In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 7, p. 495-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

         

  • 22.
    Jonsson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Danielsson, Ingela
    Jöborn, Anna
    Designing a multipurpose methodology for strategic environmental research2005In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 7, p. 489-494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 23. Jöborn, Anna
    et al.
    Danielsson, Ingela
    Arheimer, Berit
    Jonsson, Anna
    Larsson, Martin H
    Lundqvist, Lernnart J
    Löwgren, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Tonderski, Karin
    Integrated Water Management for Eutrophication Control: Public Participation, Pricing Policy and Catchment Modeling2005In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 482-488Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Karlsson, Christer
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet, Sweden.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Parker, Charles
    Uppsala Universitet, Sweden.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Legitimacy of Leadership in International Climate Change Negotiations2012In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 41, no S1, p. 46-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leadership is an essential ingredient in reaching international agreements and overcoming the collective action problems associated with responding to climate change. In this study, we aim at answering two questions that are crucial for understanding the legitimacy of leadership in international climate change negotiations. Based on the responses of three consecutive surveys distributed at COPs 14–16, we seek first to chart which actors are actually recognized as leaders by climate change negotiation participants. Second, we aim to explain what motivates COP participants to support different actors as leaders. Both these questions are indeed crucial for understanding the role, importance, and legitimacy of leadership in the international climate change regime. Our results show that the leadership landscape in this issue area is fragmented, with no one clear-cut leader, and strongly suggest that it is imperative for any actor seeking recognition as climate change leader to be perceived as being devoted to promoting the common good.

  • 25.
    Köhlin, Gunnar
    et al.
    Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Ostwald, Madelene
    Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Impact of Plantations on Forest Use and Forest Status in Orissa, India2001In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 37-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Orissa 100 thousand ha of village plantations were established from 1985 to 1992 as an aid project to support the subsistence needs of rural poor and to relieve heavy pressure on the natural forests. The aim of this paper is to examine the welfare and environmental effects of these village plantations. To do this, extensive data collection was needed which included both household utilization of different sources of biomass as well as remote-sensing information, to establish the status of the vegetation and it's spatial location vis-a-vis the users. The study shows that plantations have the potential for substantial welfare improvements for the target population, especially women, through increased consumption of biomass, decreased time for collection and decreased pressure on natural forests. However, interventions need to be very selective in order to be successful, with special consideration given to plantation location compared to natural forest.

  • 26.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Pahuja, Neha
    TERI, Indien.
    A Registry of Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Goals, Outcomes, and Institutional Requisites2012In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 41, no S1, p. 56-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     This article examines key issues in operationalizing

    a registry of nationally appropriate mitigation actions

    (NAMAs) undertaken by developing countries party to the

    United Nations framework convention on climate change. It

    analyzes goals, outcomes, and institutional prerequisites

    underlying various proposals to determine how a NAMA

    mechanism could work in international climate cooperation.

    The different proposals for how NAMA shall be designed

    relate to three basic effort-sharing arrangements in a future

    climate regime: binding commitments for all Parties, purely

    voluntary commitments for all, and legally binding commitments

    for Annex I countries but voluntary ones for others.

    We conclude that a NAMA registry could be designed so as

    initially to suit all three types of effort-sharing regimes. The

    article identifies three areas of potential common ground in a

    registry irrespective of effort-sharing type: the principle of

    common but differentiated responsibilities, the sustainable

    development objectives of the Convention, and the need for

    a systemic transition toward low-carbon energy technologies.

  • 27.
    Lundqvist, Jan Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Tortajada, C
    Varis, O
    Biswas, A
    Water management in megacities2005In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 267-268Other (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Löwgren, Marianne
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Water Framework Directive: Stakeholder preferences and catchment management strategies - are they reconcileable?2005In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. XXXIV, no 7, p. 501-506Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Markus Meier, H. E.
    et al.
    Swedish Meteorol and Hydrol Institute, Sweden .
    Andersson, Helen C.
    Swedish Meteorol and Hydrol Institute, Sweden .
    Arheimer, Berit
    Swedish Meteorol and Hydrol Institute, Sweden .
    Donnelly, Chantal
    Swedish Meteorol and Hydrol Institute, Sweden .
    Eilola, Kari
    Swedish Meteorol and Hydrol Institute, Sweden .
    Gustafsson, Bo G.
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Kotwicki, Lech
    Polish Academic Science, Poland .
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Niiranen, Susa
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Piwowarczyk, Joanna
    Polish Academic Science, Poland .
    Savchuk, Oleg P.
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Schenk, Frederik
    Helmholtz Zentrum Geesthacht, Germany .
    Marcin Weslawski, Jan
    Polish Academic Science, Poland .
    Zorita, Eduardo
    Helmholtz Zentrum Geesthacht, Germany .
    Ensemble Modeling of the Baltic Sea Ecosystem to Provide Scenarios for Management2014In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 37-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a multi-model ensemble study for the Baltic Sea, and investigate the combined impact of changing climate, external nutrient supply, and fisheries on the marine ecosystem. The applied regional climate system model contains state-of-the-art component models for the atmosphere, sea ice, ocean, land surface, terrestrial and marine biogeochemistry, and marine food-web. Time-dependent scenario simulations for the period 1960-2100 are performed and uncertainties of future projections are estimated. In addition, reconstructions since 1850 are carried out to evaluate the models sensitivity to external stressors on long time scales. Information from scenario simulations are used to support decision-makers and stakeholders and to raise awareness of climate change, environmental problems, and possible abatement strategies among the general public using geovisualization. It is concluded that the study results are relevant for the Baltic Sea Action Plan of the Helsinki Commission.

  • 30.
    Mattsson, Eskil
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden .
    Ostwald, Madelene
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden .
    Nissanka, S. P.
    University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka .
    Marambe, Buddie
    University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka .
    Homegardens as a Multi-functional Land-Use Strategy in Sri Lanka with Focus on Carbon Sequestration2013In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 42, no 7, p. 892-902Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the concept of homegardens and their potential functions as strategic elements in land-use planning, and adaptation and mitigation to climate change in Sri Lanka. The ancient and locally adapted agroforestry system of homegardens is presently estimated to occupy nearly 15 % of the land area in Sri Lanka and is described in the scientific literature to offer several ecosystem services to its users; such as climate regulation, protection against natural hazards, enhanced land productivity and biological diversity, increased crop diversity and food security for rural poor and hence reduced vulnerability to climate change. Our results, based on a limited sample size, indicate that the homegardens also store significant amount of carbon, with above ground biomass carbon stocks in dry zone homegardens (n = 8) ranging from 10 to 55 megagrams of carbon per hectare (Mg C ha(-1)) with a mean value of 35 Mg C ha(-1), whereas carbon stocks in wet zone homegardens (n = 4) range from 48 to 145 Mg C ha(-1) with a mean value of 87 Mg C ha(-1). This implies that homegardens may contain a significant fraction of the total above ground biomass carbon stock in the terrestrial system in Sri Lanka, and from our estimates its share has increased from almost one-sixth in 1992 to nearly one-fifth in 2010. In the light of current discussions on reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+), the concept of homegardens in Sri Lanka provides interesting aspects to the debate and future research in terms of forest definitions, setting reference levels, and general sustainability.

  • 31.
    McCarthy, Jenny
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology.
    Gumbricht, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    McCarthy, Terence
    University of the Witwatersrand.
    Frost, Phillip
    Institute for Soil, Climate and Water, South Africa.
    Wessels, Konrad
    University of Maryland.
    Seidel, Frank
    Technical University of Dresden.
    Flooding patterns of the Okavango wetland in Botswana between 1972 and 20002003In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 32, no 7, p. 453-457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The inundated area of the Okavango Delta changes annually and interannually. The variability relates to regional precipitation over the catchment area in the Angolan highlands, and to local rainfall. The patterns of the wetland were captured using more than 3000 satellite images for the period 1972 to 2000, near daily NOAA AVHRR data for 1985-2000, and less frequent images of the Landsat sensors from 1972 onwards. One AVHRR image for every 10-day period was classified into land and water using an unsupervised classification method. Evaluation against Landsat TM and ERS2-ATSR data indicate an agreement of 89% for the size of estimated inundation area. Results show that the wetland area has varied between approximately 2450 km(2) and 11 400 km(2) during the last 30 years.

  • 32.
    Morth, Carl-Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Humborg, Christoph
    Stockholms universitet.
    Eriksson, Hanna
    Stockholms universitet.
    Danielsson, Åsa
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Medina, Miguel Rodriguez
    Stockholms universitet.
    Lofgren, Stefan
    SLU.
    Swaney, Dennis P.
    Cornell University.
    Rahm, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Modeling riverine nutrient transport to the Baltic Sea: A large-scale approach2007In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 36, no 02-Mar, p. 124-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We developed for the first time a catchment model simulating simultaneously the nutrient land-sea fluxes from all 105 major watersheds within the Baltic Sea drainage area. A consistent modeling approach to all these major watersheds, i.e., a consistent handling of water fluxes (hydrological simulations) and loading functions (emission data), will facilitate a comparison of riverine nutrient transport between Baltic Sea subbasins that differ substantially. Hot spots of riverine emissions, such as from the rivers Vistula, Oder, and Daugava or from the Danish coast, can be easily demonstrated and the comparison between these hot spots, and the relatively unperturbed rivers in the northern catchments show decisionmakers where remedial actions are most effective to improve the environmental state of the Baltic Sea, and, secondly, what percentage reduction of riverine nutrient loads is possible. The relative difference between measured and simulated fluxes during the validation period was generally small. The cumulative deviation (i.e., relative bias) [Sigma(Simulated - Measured)/Sigma Measured X 100 (%)] from monitored water and nutrient fluxes amounted to+8.2% for runoff, to-2.4% for dissolved inorganic nitrogen, to +5.1% for total nitrogen, to +13% for dissolved inorganic phosphorus and to +19% for total phosphorus. Moreover, the model suggests that point sources for total phosphorus compiled by existing pollution load compilations are underestimated because of inconsistencies in calculating effluent loads from municipalities.

  • 33.
    Olsson, Johanna Alkan
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Berg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Local stakeholders acceptance of model-generated data used as a communication tool in water management: The Ronnea study2005In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 507-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to increase the knowledge of local stakeholders acceptance of model-generated data when used as a communication tool in water quality management. The Ronnea catchment in the southwest of Sweden was chosen as the study area. The results indicate the model-generated data served as a uniting factor. Simultaneously, the stakeholders were concerned with presented data, the main problems being sources of pollution, which were not accounted for, lack of trustworthiness when measuring pollution, and the uncertainty of the impact of natural variation and delayed effects. Four clusters of factors were identified as influencing stakeholders acceptance of the model-generated data: confidence in its practical applications, confidence in the people involved in or providing material for the dialog (such as experts, decision-makers, and media), the social characteristics of the participants (such as age and profession), and the way of communicating the data (such as tone of communication, group composition, duration, and geographical scope of the dialog). The perception of the fairness of the practical application of given model-generated data was also an important factor for acceptance.

  • 34.
    Piwowarczyk, Joanna
    et al.
    Institute of Oceanology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland.
    Hansson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Chubarenko, Boris
    Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia.
    Karmanov, Konstantin
    Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia.
    Climate change in the baltic sea region: A cross-country analysis of institutional stakeholder perceptions2012In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 645-655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Before climate change is considered in long-term coastal management, it is necessary to investigate how institutional stakeholders in coastal management conceptualize climate change, as their awareness will ultimately affect their actions. Using questionnaires in eight Baltic Sea riparian countries, this study examines environmental managers’ awareness of climate change. Our results indicate that problems related to global warming are deemed secondary to short-term social and economic issues. Respondents agree that problems caused by global warming will become increasingly important, but pay little attention to adaptation and mitigation strategies. Current environmental problems are expected to continue to be urgent in the future. We conclude that an apparent gap exists between decision making, public concerns, and scientific consensus, resulting in a situation in which the latest evidence rarely influences commonly held opinions.

  • 35.
    Sharpley, Andrew N.
    et al.
    University of Arkansas, AR 72701 USA.
    Bergstrom, Lars
    Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Sweden.
    Aronsson, Helena
    Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Sweden.
    Bechmann, Marianne
    Bioforsk, Norway.
    Bolster, Carl H.
    ARS, KY 42104 USA.
    Borling, Katarina
    Swedish Board Agriculture, Sweden.
    Djodjic, Faruk
    Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Sweden.
    Jarvie, Helen P.
    Centre Ecol and Hydrol, England.
    Schoumans, Oscar F.
    Alterra Wageningen UR, Netherlands.
    Stamm, Christian
    Eawag, Switzerland.
    Sundblad-Tonderski, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ulen, Barbro
    Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Sweden.
    Uusitalo, Risto
    MTT Agrifood Research Finland, Finland.
    Withers, Paul J. A.
    Bangor University, Wales.
    Future agriculture with minimized phosphorus losses to waters: Research needs and direction2015In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 44, p. S163-S179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The series of papers in this issue of AMBIO represent technical presentations made at the 7th International Phosphorus Workshop (IPW7), held in September, 2013 in Uppsala, Sweden. At that meeting, the 150 delegates were involved in round table discussions on major, predetermined themes facing the management of agricultural phosphorus (P) for optimum production goals with minimal water quality impairment. The six themes were (1) P management in a changing world; (2) transport pathways of P from soil to water; (3) monitoring, modeling, and communication; (4) importance of manure and agricultural production systems for P management; (5) identification of appropriate mitigation measures for reduction of P loss; and (6) implementation of mitigation strategies to reduce P loss. This paper details the major challenges and research needs that were identified for each theme and identifies a future roadmap for catchment management that cost-effectively minimizes P loss from agricultural activities.

  • 36.
    Stigebrandt, Anders
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Liljebladh, Bengt
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    de Brabandere, Loreto
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium .
    Forth, Michael
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Granmo, Åke
    Marine Monitoring AB, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Hall, Per
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Hammar, Jonatan
    Marine Monitoring AB, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Hansson, Daniel
    Swedish Institute for the Marine Environment, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Kononets, Mikhail
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Marina
    Marine Monitoring AB, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Norén, Fredrik
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Rahm, Lars
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Treusch, Alexander H.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Viktorsson, Lena
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    An Experiment with Forced Oxygenation of the Deepwater of the Anoxic By Fjord, Western Sweden2015In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 42-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a 2.5-year-long environmental engineering experiment in the By Fjord, surface water was pumped into the deepwater where the frequency of deepwater renewals increased by a factor of 10. During the experiment, the deepwater became long-term oxic, and nitrate became the dominating dissolved inorganic nitrogen component. The amount of phosphate in the water column decreased by a factor of 5 due to the increase in flushing and reduction in the leakage of phosphate from the sediments when the sediment surface became oxidized. Oxygenation of the sediments did not increase the leakage of toxic metals and organic pollutants. The bacterial community was the first to show changes after the oxygenation, with aerobic bacteria also thriving in the deepwater. The earlier azoic deepwater bottom sediments were colonized by animals. No structural difference between the phytoplankton communities in the By Fjord and the adjacent Havsten Fjord, with oxygenated deepwater, could be detected during the experiment.

  • 37.
    Stigebrandt, Anders
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Rahm, Lars
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Viktorsson, Lena
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Odalen, Malin
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Hall, Per O. J.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Liljebladh, Bengt
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    A New Phosphorus Paradigm for the Baltic Proper2014In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 634-643Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The external phosphorus (P) loading has been halved, but the P content in the water column and the area of anoxic bottoms in Baltic proper has increased during the last 30 years. This can be explained by a temporary internal source of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) that is turned on when the water above the bottom sediment becomes anoxic. A load-response model, explaining the evolution from 1980 to 2005, suggests that the average specific DIP flux from anoxic bottoms in the Baltic proper is about 2.3 g P m(-2) year(-1). This is commensurable with fluxes estimated in situ from anoxic bottoms in the open Baltic proper and from hydrographic data in the deep part of Bornholm Basin. Oxygenation of anoxic bottoms, natural or manmade, may quickly turn off the internal P source from anoxic bottoms. This new P-paradigm should have far-reaching implications for abatement of eutrophication in the Baltic proper.

  • 38.
    Sundh, I
    et al.
    SLU, Dept Microbiol, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden SLU, Dept Forest Ecol, SE-90183 Umea, Sweden Off Environm & Construct, SE-29324 Olofstrom, Sweden Ralph M Parsons Lab, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA Linkoping Univ, Dept Water & Environm Studies, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Nilsson, M
    Mikkela, C
    SLU, Dept Microbiol, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden SLU, Dept Forest Ecol, SE-90183 Umea, Sweden Off Environm & Construct, SE-29324 Olofstrom, Sweden Ralph M Parsons Lab, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA Linkoping Univ, Dept Water & Environm Studies, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Granberg, G
    SLU, Dept Microbiol, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden SLU, Dept Forest Ecol, SE-90183 Umea, Sweden Off Environm & Construct, SE-29324 Olofstrom, Sweden Ralph M Parsons Lab, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA Linkoping Univ, Dept Water & Environm Studies, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Svensson, Bo
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Fluxes of methane and carbon dioxide on peat-mining areas in Sweden2000In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 29, no 8, p. 499-503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drainage and peat harvesting may induce considerable changes in the fluxes to the atmosphere of the greenhouse gases CH4 and CO2 in peatlands. In this study, fluxes of CH4 and CO2 were measured with the closed chamber method in 6 Swedish peatlands that are being mined. Fluxes of CH4 were much higher from ditches than from mining "strips", i.e. emissions from ditches dominated in most peatlands. The total CH4 emission during the growing season (0.41 to 4.5 g CH4 m(-2) yr(-1)) was similar to emissions from virgin peatlands. Emissions from ditches can probably be kept low by keeping the ditches clear from vegetation. Like CH4, CO2 was released to the atmosphere from both ditches and strips in most peatlands. The total emission during the growing season (0.23 to 1.0 kg CO2 m(-2) yr(-1)) was strongly dominated by the strips. Compared to the total peat yield during mining these CO2 emission rates imply that on average ca 6% of the peat carbon is lost by microbial decomposition in the mire.

  • 39.
    Tonderski, Karin S
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Ecology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Arheimer, Berit
    Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute.
    Pers, Charlotta B.
    Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute.
    Modeling the impact of potential wetlands on phosphorus retention in a Swedish catchment2005In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 544-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In southern Sweden, wetlands are constructed to remove nitrogen (N) in agricultural catchments. The possible effects of such wetlands on riverine phosphorus (P) were also estimated using input-output data from three well-monitored wetlands. This was done to formulate a simple model for removal of P that is dependent on inflow characteristics. Next, the N- and P-reducing effects of wetlands were modeled on a catchment scale (1900 km 2) using the HBV-NP model and various assumptions about the wetland area and location. All three wetlands functioned as sinks for total P (tot-P) and for total suspended solids (TSS) with a removal of 10% to 31% and 28% to 50%, respectively. Mean P-removal rates of 17-49 kg ha(-1) yr(-1) were well simulated with the model. Catchment scale simulations indicated that wetlands were more efficient (in percentage of load) as traps for P than for N and that this may motivate the construction of wetlands for P removal far upstream from the catchment outlet.

  • 40.
    Withers, Paul J. A.
    et al.
    Bangor University, United Kingdom.
    van Dijk, Kimo C.
    Wageningen University, The Netherlands.
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Nesme, Thomas
    Bordeaux University, France.
    Oenema, Oene
    Wageningen University, The Netherlands.
    Rubæk, Gitte H.
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Schoumans, Oscar
    Wageningen University, The Netherlands.
    Smit, Bert
    Wageningen University, The Netherlands.
    Pellerin, Sylvain
    INRA, France.
    Stewardship to tackle global phosphorus inefficiency: The case of Europe2015In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 193-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The inefficient use of phosphorus (P) in the food chain is a threat to the global aquatic environment and the health and well-being of citizens, and it is depleting an essential finite natural resource critical for future food security and ecosystem function. We outline a strategic framework of 5R stewardship (Re-align P inputs, Reduce P losses, Recycle P in bioresources, Recover P in wastes, and Redefine P in food systems) to help identify and deliver a range of integrated, cost-effective, and feasible technological innovations to improve P use efficiency in society and reduce Europe’s dependence on P imports. Their combined adoption facilitated by interactive policies, co-operation between upstream and downstream stakeholders (researchers, investors, producers, distributors, and consumers), and more harmonized approaches to P accounting would maximize the resource and environmental benefits and help deliver a more competitive, circular, and sustainable European economy. The case of Europe provides a blueprint for global P stewardship.

  • 41.
    Wittgren, Hans Bertil
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies.
    Castensson, Reinhold
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Gipperth, L
    Joelsson, A
    Jonasson, L
    Pettersson, A
    Thunvik, R
    Torstensson, G
    An actor game on implementation of environmental quality standards for nitrogen in a Swedish agricultural catchment2005In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 237-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite political efforts, diffuse pollution from agriculture continues to be the single largest source of nitrogen (N) emissions into the aquatic environment in many countries and regions. This fact, and the recent enactment of a new Swedish environmental code, led to the design of a study targeted at the evaluation of new N pollution abatement strategies. An actor game was chosen as the key component of the study, with a focus on four major goals: to test the implementability of legally binding environmental quality standards for nitrate concentration in groundwater and N transport to the sea, to find sets of agriculturally feasible and cost-effective measures to decrease N loads, to investigate the possibilities for collective action through negotiated and institutionalized actor cooperation, and to investigate the role of mathematical modeling in environmental N management. Characteristics from the agriculturally dominated catchment of Genevadsan (224 km(2)) on the southwest coast of Sweden served as the playing field for the actor game. The most noteworthy result from the study was that it appeared to be possible to meet ambitious environmental N standards with less economically drastic measures than anticipated by most of the participants. The actor game was shown to be a good method for learning about the new Swedish environmental code and its application and for gaining deeper insight into the issues of N management. In addition, the actor game functioned as an arena for gaining a more thorough understanding of the views of different stakeholders.

  • 42.
    Wulff, Fredrik
    et al.
    Dept. of Systems Ecology Stockholm University.
    Rahm, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Jonsson, Per
    Dept. of Limnology Uppsala University.
    Brydsten, Lars
    Dept. of Physical Geography Umeå University.
    Ahl, Torsten
    Dept. of Water Resources SLU.
    Granmo, Åke
    Kristineberg Research Station Göteborg University.
    A mass balance of chlorinated organic matter for the Baltic Sea - A challenge to ecotoxicology1992In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 27-31Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Wulff, Fredrik
    et al.
    Dept. of Systems Ecology Stockholm University.
    Stigebrandt, Anders
    Dept. of Oceanography Göteborg University.
    Rahm, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Nutrient dynamics of the Baltic Sea1990In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 126-133Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 43 of 43
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