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  • 1.
    Arm, M
    Swedish Natl Rd & Transport Res Inst, VTI, SE-58195 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Self-cementing properties of crushed demolished concrete in unbound layers: results from triaxial tests and field tests2001In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 235-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A 2-year study is underway to evaluate the expected growth in stiffness in layers of crushed concrete from demolished structures. This growth is said to be a result of self-cementing properties. The study consists of repeated load triaxial tests on manufactured specimens after different storing time together with falling weight deflectometer, FWD, measurements on test sections. Results so far show a clear increase with time in resilient modulus and in back-calculated layer modulus for all concrete materials. The increase is the largest in the first months and then diminishes. The field measurements show a more considerable growth in stiffness than the laboratory tests, with a doubled value two years after construction. Comparative investigations on natural aggregates, mostly crushed granite do not show any growth in stiffness, neither in the laboratory nor in the field. Consequences for the choice of design modulus are discussed. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Einhaeupl, Paul
    et al.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium; UAntwerpen, Belgium.
    Krook, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Svensson, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Van Acker, Karel
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium; Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Van Passel, Steven
    UAntwerpen, Belgium.
    Eliciting stakeholder needs - An anticipatory approach assessing enhanced landfill mining2019In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 98, p. 113-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Landfill owners, governmental institutions, technology providers, academia and local communities are important stakeholders involved in Enhanced Landfill Mining (ELFM). This concept of excavating and processing historical waste streams to higher added values can be seen as a continuation of traditional landfill mining (LFM) and seems to be an innovative and promising idea for potential environmental and societal benefits. However, ELFMs profitability is still under debate, and environmental as well as societal impacts have to be further investigated. This study provides a first step towards an anticipatory approach, assessing ELFM through stakeholder integration. In the study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with various stakeholders, involved in a case study in Flanders, Belgium. Participants were selected across a quadruple helix (QH) framework, i.e. industrial, governmental, scientific, and local community actors. The research comprises 13 interviews conducted with an aim to elicit stakeholder needs for ELFM implementation using a general inductive approach. In total 18 different stakeholder needs were identified. The paper explains how the stakeholder needs refer to the different dimensions of sustainability, which groups of stakeholders they primarily affect, and what types of uncertainty could be influenced by their implementation. The stakeholder needs are structured into societal, environmental, regulatory and techno-economic needs. Results show additional economic, environmental, and societal aspects of ELFM to be integrated into ELFM research, as well as a need for the dynamic modeling of impacts. (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Ekstrand, Eva-Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Karlsson, Marielle
    Linköping University, Biogas Research Center. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Scandinavian Biogas Fuels AB, Sweden.
    Truong, Xu-Bin
    Linköping University, Biogas Research Center. Scandinavian Biogas Fuels AB, Sweden.
    Björn, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Karlsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Biogas Research Center. Scandinavian Biogas Fuels AB, Sweden.
    Svensson, Bo H.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ejlertsson, Jörgen
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Scandinavian Biogas Fuels AB, Sweden.
    High-rate anaerobic co-digestion of kraft mill fibre sludge and activated sludge by CSTRs with sludge recirculation2016In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 56, p. 166-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Kraft fibre sludge from the pulp and paper industry constitutes a new, widely available substrate for thebiogas production industry, with high methane potential. In this study, anaerobic digestion of kraft fibresludge was examined by applying continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTR) with sludge recirculation.Two lab-scale reactors (4L) were run for 800 days, one on fibre sludge (R1), and the other on fibre sludgeand activated sludge (R2). Additions of Mg, K and S stabilized reactor performance. Furthermore, theCa:Mg ratio was important, and a stable process was achieved at a ratio below 16:1. Foaming was abatedby short but frequent mixing. Co-digestion of fibre sludge and activated sludge resulted in more robustconditions, and high-rate operation at stable conditions was achieved at an organic loading rate of 4 gvolatile solids (VS) L1 day1, a hydraulic retention time of 4 days and a methane production of230 ± 10 Nm L per g VS.

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  • 4.
    Fallman, AM
    Swedish Geotech Inst, SE-58193 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Leaching of chromium and barium from steel slag in laboratory and field tests - a solubility controlled process?2000In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 20, no 2-3, p. 149-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Differences in concentrations in leachates and leaching conditions were found in laboratory and field tests on electric are furnace steel slag. Solid phases were assumed to control the leachate concentrations of chromium and barium. Geochemical modelling was used to indicate solubility controlling solid phases. The mineral BaSO4(c) and solid solutions of Ba(S,Cr)O-4 were predicted to control the concentrations of barium and chromium in the leachates, respectively. These solids were not expected to be present as primary minerals in the steel slag but were rapidly formed, within 6 h. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 5.
    Frändegård, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Krook, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Svensson, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Integrating remediation and resource recovery: On the economic conditions of landfill mining2015In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 42, p. 137-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes the economic potential of integrating material separation and resource recovery into a landfill remediation project, and discusses the result and the largest impact factors. The analysis is done using a direct costs/revenues approach and the stochastic uncertainties are handled using Monte Carlo simulation.

    Two remediation scenarios are applied to a hypothetical landfill. One scenario includes only remediation, while the second scenario adds resource recovery to the remediation project. Moreover, the second scenario is divided into two cases, case A and B. In case A, the landfill tax needs to be paid for re-deposited material and the landfill holder does not own a combined heat and power plant (CHP), which leads to disposal costs in the form of gate fees. In case B, the landfill tax is waived on the re-deposited material and the landfill holder owns its own CHP.

    Results show that the remediation project in the first scenario costs about €23/ton. Adding resource recovery as in case A worsens the result to −€36/ton, while for case B the result improves to −€14/ton. This shows the importance of landfill tax and the access to a CHP. Other important factors for the result are the material composition in the landfill, the efficiency of the separation technology used, and the price of the saleable material.

  • 6.
    Gålfalk, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bastviken, David
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Remote sensing of methane and nitrous oxide fluxes from waste incineration2018In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 75, p. 319-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Incomplete combustion processes lead to the formation of many gaseous byproducts that can be challenging to monitor in flue gas released via chimneys. This study presents ground-based remote sensing approaches to make greenhouse gas (GHG) flux measurements of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) from a waste incineration chimney at distances of 150-200 m. The study found emission of N2O (corresponding to 30-40 t yr(-1)), which is a consequence of adding the reduction agent urea to decrease NOx emissions due to NOx regulation; a procedure that instead increases N2O emissions (which is approximately 300 times more potent as a GHG than CO2 on a 100-year time scale). CH4 emissions of 7-11 t yr(-1) was also detected from the studied chimney despite the usage of a high incineration temperature. For this particular plant, local knowledge is high and emission estimates at corresponding levels have been reported previously. However, emissions of CH(4 )are often not included in GHG emission inventories for waste incineration. This study highlights the importance of monitoring combustion processes, and shows the possibility of surveying CH4 and N2O emissions from waste incineration at distances of several hundred meters. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 7.
    Johansson, Nils
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Krook, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Frändegård, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A new dawn for buried garbage?: An investigation of the marketability of previously disposed shredder waste2017In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 60, p. 417-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the market potential of disposed shredder waste, a resource that is increasingly emphasized as a future mine. A framework with gate requirements of various outlets was developed and contrasted with a pilot project focusing on excavated waste from a shredder landfill, sorted in an advanced recycling facility. Only the smallest fraction by percentage had an outlet, the metals (8%), which were sold according to a lower quality class. The other fractions (92%) were not accepted for incineration, as construction materials or even for re-deposition. Previous studies have shown similar lack of marketability. This means that even if one fraction can be recovered, the outlet of the other material is often unpredictable, resulting in a waste disposal problem, which easily prevents a landfill mining project altogether. This calls for marketability and usability of deposited waste to become a central issue for landfill mining research. The paper concludes by discussing how concerned actors can enhance the marketability, for example by pre-treating the disposed waste to acclimatize it to existing sorting methods. However, for concerned actors to become interested in approaching unconventional resources such as deposited waste, greater regulatory flexibility is needed in which, for example, re-deposition could be allowed as long as the environmental benefits of the projects outweigh the disadvantages.

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  • 8.
    Jonsson, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ejlertsson, Jörgen
    Vatten, Produktion Tekniska Verken.
    Svensson, Bo
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Transformation of phthalates in young landfill cells2003In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 23, no 7, p. 641-651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phthalic acid diesters are additives in a variety of materials that can end up in landfills. Leachates from a series of full-scale young landfill cells were analysed over time for dimethyl, diethyl, dibutyl, butylbenzyl, and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (respectively designated DMP, DEP, DBP, BBP, and DEHP), and their corresponding monoesters monomethyl, monoethyl, monobutyl, monobenzyl, and mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MMP, MEP, MbutP, MbenzP, and MEHP, respectively), as well as o-phthalic acid (PA). One landfill cell was created in each of three consecutive years by deposition of the same type of waste in July and August. The pH, volatile fatty acids (VFAs), and total organic carbon (TOC) were measured to characterise development of the degradation phases in three landfill cells, which revealed early acidogenic to initial methanogenic stages. Analysis of the phthalate compounds showed that observed concentrations of the degradation products were below the detection limit in the acidogenic leachates but exceeded concentrations of their corresponding diesters in leachates from cells in the initial methanogenic phase. Maximum and average concentrations of phthalic acid were 50 and 23 mg/l, respectively, and the corresponding values for the other phthalates were 430 and 27 ╡g/l. The concentrations of all phthalates decreased during the establishment of stable methanogenic conditions. ⌐ 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 9.
    Krook, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Developing a monitoring method facilitating continual improvements in the sorting of waste at recycling centres2010In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 32-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Beneficial use of waste relies on efficient systems for collection and separation. In Sweden, a bring system involving recycling centres for collection of bulky, electr(on)ic and hazardous waste has been introduced. A significant share of this waste is incorrectly sorted, causing downstream environmental implications. At present, however, there is a lack of affordable and accurate monitoring methods for providing the recycling centres with the necessary facts for improving the sorting of waste. The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate the usability of a simplified and potentially more suitable waste monitoring method for recycling centres. This method is based on standardised observations where the occurrence of incorrect sorting is monitored by taking digital pictures of the waste which then are analysed according to certain guidelines. The results show that the developed monitoring method could offer a resource-efficient and useful tool for proactive quality work at recycling centres, involving continuous efforts in developing and evaluating measures for improved sorting of waste. More research is however needed in order to determine to what extent the obtained results from the monitoring method are reliable.

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  • 10.
    Krook, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Svensson, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Landfill mining: A critical review of two decades of research2012In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 513-520Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Landfills have historically been seen as the ultimate solution for storing waste at minimum cost. It is nowa well-known fact that such deposits have related implications such as long-term methane emissions,local pollution concerns, settling issues and limitations on urban development. Landfill mining has beensuggested as a strategy to address such problems, and in principle means the excavation, processing,treatment and/or recycling of deposited materials. This study involves a literature review on landfill miningcovering a meta-analysis of the main trends, objectives, topics and findings in 39 research paperspublished during the period 1988–2008. The results show that, so far, landfill mining has primarily beenseen as a way to solve traditional management issues related to landfills such as lack of landfill space andlocal pollution concerns. Although most initiatives have involved some recovery of deposited resources,mainly cover soil and in some cases waste fuel, recycling efforts have often been largely secondary. Typically,simple soil excavation and screening equipment have therefore been applied, often demonstratingmoderate performance in obtaining marketable recyclables. Several worldwide changes and recentresearch findings indicate the emergence of a new perspective on landfills as reservoirs for resourceextraction. Although the potential of this approach appears significant, it is argued that facilitating implementationinvolves a number of research challenges in terms of technology innovation, clarifying theconditions for realization and developing standardized frameworks for evaluating economic and environmentalperformance from a systems perspective. In order to address these challenges, a combination ofapplied and theoretical research is required.

  • 11.
    Krook, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mårtensson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Libiseller, Claudia
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Statistics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Swedish recovered wood waste: Linking regulation and contamination2008In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 638-648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, large amounts of wood waste are generated annually from construction and demolition activities, but also from other discarded products such as packaging and furniture. A large share of this waste is today recovered and used for heat production. However, previous research has found that recovered wood waste (RWW) contains hazardous substances, which has significant implications for the environmental performance of recycling. Improved sorting is often suggested as a proper strategy to decrease such implications. In this study, we aim to analyse the impacts of waste regulation on the contamination of RWW. The occurrence of industrial preservative-treated wood, which contains several hazardous substances, was used as an indicator for contamination. First the management of RWW during 1995–2004 was studied through interviews with involved actors. We then determined the occurrence of industrial preservative-treated wood in RWW for that time period for each supplier (actor). From the results, it can be concluded that a substantially less contaminated RWW today relies on extensive source separation. The good news is that some actors, despite several obstacles for such upstream efforts, have already today proved capable of achieving relatively efficient separation. In most cases, however, the existing waste regulation has not succeeded in establishing strong enough incentives for less contaminated waste in general, nor for extensive source separation in particular. One important factor for this outcome is that the current market forces encourage involved actors to practice weak quality requirements and to rely on end-of-pipe solutions, rather than put pressure for improvements on upstream actors. Another important reason is that there is a lack of communication and oversight of existing waste regulations. Without such steering mechanisms, the inherent pressure from regulations becomes neutralized.

  • 12.
    Laner, David
    et al.
    Univ Kassel, Germany; TU Wien, Austria.
    Esguerra, John Laurence
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Antwerp, Belgium.
    Krook, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Horttanainen, Mika
    Lappeenranta Univ Technol, Finland.
    Kriipsalu, Mait
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Estonia.
    Rosendal, Rene Moller
    Danish Waste Solut ApS, Denmark.
    Stanisavljevic, Nemanja
    Univ Novi Sad, Serbia.
    Systematic assessment of critical factors for the economic performance of landfill mining in Europe: What drives the economy of landfill mining?2019In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 95, p. 674-686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Landfill mining (LFM) is a strategy to mitigate environmental impacts associated with landfills, while simultaneously recovering dormant materials, energy carriers, and land resources. Although several case study assessments on the economy of LFM exist, a broader understanding of the driving factors is still lacking. This study aims at identifying generically important factors for the economy of LFM in Europe and understanding their role in developing economically feasible projects in view of different site, project and system-level conditions. Therefore, a set-based modeling approach is used to establish a large number (531,441) of LFM scenarios, evaluate their economic performance in terms of net present value (NPV), and analyze the relationships between input factors and economic outcome via global sensitivity analysis. The scenario results range from -139 Euro to +127 Euro/Mg of excavated waste, with 80% of the scenarios having negative NPVs. Variations in the costs for waste treatment and disposal and the avoided cost of alternative landfill management (i.e. if the landfill was not mined) have the strongest effect on the scenario NPVs, which illustrates the critical role of system level factors for LFM economy and the potential of policy intervention to incentivize LFM. Consequently, system conditions should guide site selection and project development, which is exemplified in the study for two extreme regional archetypes in terms of income and waste management standard. Future work should further explore the developed model to provide decision support on LFM strategies in consideration of alternative purposes, stakeholders, and objectives. (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    The full text will be freely available from 2021-07-09 14:49
  • 13.
    Lind, B.B.
    et al.
    Swedish Geotechnical Institute, Regional Office Göteborg, Chalmers Vasa, Building 5, SE-412 96 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Fallman, A.-M.
    Larsson, L.B.
    Swedish Geotechnical Institute, Regional Office Göteborg, Chalmers Vasa, Building 5, SE-412 96 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Environmental impact of ferrochrome slag in road construction2001In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 255-264Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Vargon Alloys in Western Sweden is one of the largest producers of ferrochrome slag in Europe. Ferrochrome slag is a by-product from the production of ferrochrome, an essential component in stainless steel. Extensive tests have been carried out on the physical properties of the ferrochrome slag from Vargon Alloys and it was found to be highly suitable as road construction material. The composition and leaching tests of the ferrochrome slag show that the chromium content is high, 1-3%, although leaching under normal conditions is very low. With the exception of potassium (K), which had a potential leaching capacity (availability test) of around 16%, the leaching of chromium, nickel, zinc and other elements was just a few per cent. However, all these tests were conducted in the laboratory. What happens out in the field, under the influence of acid rain and biological activity, and how does this compare with the laboratory results? To answer this question an investigation was carried out to study the environmental impact of ferrochrome slag in roads that were built in 1994. The investigation includes soil sampling (total content and leachable amounts of metals) and groundwater analysis (filtered and non-filtered samples). In addition, a new method involving the bio-uptake of chromium and other metals by the roots of the dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) was tested. The results show that there was a low migration of particles from the slag to the underlying soil and that the leaching into the groundwater was also low for all the elements analysed. However, there seemed to be a significant uptake of Cr by plants growing with their roots in the slag. An investigation of plant uptake was an important complement to laboratory leaching tests on alternative materials. Copyright (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.Vargon Alloys in Western Sweden is one of the largest producers of ferrochrome slag in Europe. Ferrochrome slag is a by-product from the production of ferrochrome, an essential component in stainless steel. Extensive tests have been carried out on the physical properties of the ferrochrome slag from Vargon Alloys and it was found to be highly suitable as road construction material. The composition and leaching tests of the ferrochrome slag show that the chromium content is high, 1-3%, although leaching under normal conditions is very low. With the exception of potassium (K), which had a potential leaching capacity (availability test) of around 16%, the leaching of chromium, nickel, zinc and other elements was just a few per cent. However, all these tests were conducted in the laboratory. What happens out in the field, under the influence of acid rain and biological activity, and how does this compare with the laboratory results? To answer this question an investigation was carried out to study the environmental impact of ferrochrome slag in roads that were built in 1994. The investigation includes soil sampling (total content and leachable amounts of metals) and groundwater analysis (filtered and non-filtered samples). In addition, a new method involving the bio-uptake of chromium and other metals by the roots of the dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) was tested. The results show that there was a low migration of particles from the slag to the underlying soil and that the leaching into the groundwater was also low for all the elements analyzed. However, there seemed to be a significant uptake of Cr by plants growing with their roots in the slag. An investigation of plant uptake was an important complement to laboratory leaching tests on alternative materials.

  • 14.
    Moestedt, J.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Biogas Research Center. Department of R&D Biogas, Tekniska verken i Linköping AB, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Microbiology, BioCenter, University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nordell, E.
    Linköping University, Biogas Research Center. Department of R&D Biogas, Tekniska verken i Linköping AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Shakeri Yekta, Sepehr
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center.
    Lundgren, J.
    Linköping University, Biogas Research Center. Department of R&D Biogas, Tekniska verken i Linköping AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Marti, Magali
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center.
    Sundberg, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center.
    Ejlertsson, Jörgen
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center. Scandinavian Biogas Fuels AB, Sweden.
    Svensson, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center.
    Björn, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center.
    Effects of trace element addition on process stability during anaerobic co-digestion of OFMSW and slaughterhouse waste2016In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 47, no Pt A, p. 11-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study used semi-continuous laboratory scale biogas reactors to simulate the effects of trace-element addition in different combinations, while degrading the organic fraction of municipal solid waste and slaughterhouse waste. The results show that the combined addition of Fe, Co and Ni was superior to the addition of only Fe, Fe and Co or Fe and Ni. However, the addition of only Fe resulted in a more stable process than the combined addition of Fe and Co, perhaps indicating a too efficient acidogenesis and/or homoacetogenesis in relation to a Ni-deprived methanogenic population. The results were observed in terms of higher biogas production (+9%), biogas production rates (+35%) and reduced VFA concentration for combined addition compared to only Fe and Ni. The higher stability was supported by observations of differences in viscosity, intraday WA-and biogas kinetics as well as by the 16S rRNA gene and 16S rRNA of the methanogens.(c) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 15.
    Nordell, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Biogas Research Center. Tekniska Verken Linkoping AB Publ, Dept Biogas RandD, SE-58115 Linkoping, Sweden .
    B Hansson, Anna
    Linköping University, Biogas Research Center. Tekniska Verken Linkoping AB Publ, Dept Biogas RandD, SE-58115 Linkoping, Sweden .
    Karlsson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center. Tekniska Verken Linkoping AB Publ, Dept Biogas RandD, SE-58115 Linkoping, Sweden .
    Zeolites relieves inhibitory stress from high concentrations of long chain fatty acids2013In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 33, no 12, p. 2659-2663Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein and fat rich slaughterhouse waste is a very attractive waste stream for the production of biogas because of the high biochemical methane potential of the substrate. The material has however some drawbacks as the sole material for biogas production due to the production of several process disturbing metabolites such as ammonia, sulfides and long chain fatty acids. We can in this work present results that show that zeolites have the potential to relieve inhibitory stress from the presence of long chain fatty acids. Moreover, the results strongly indicate that it is mainly acetic acid consumers that are most negatively affected by long chain fatty acids and that the mechanism of stress relief is an adsorption of long chain fatty acids to the zeolites. In addition to this, it is shown that the effect is immediate and that only a small amount of zeolites is necessary to cancel the inhibitory effect of long chain fatty acids.

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