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  • 1.
    Backstrand, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Kuyper, Jonathan W.
    Stockholm University, Sweden; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. University of Oxford, England.
    Lövbrand, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Non-state actors in global climate governance: from Copenhagen to Paris and beyond2017In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 26, no 4, 561-579 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 2.
    Kuchler, Magdalena
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    The human rights turn: ENGOs changing tactics in the quest for a more transparent, participatory and accountable CDM2017In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 26, no 4, 648-668 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-state actors are increasingly participating in international climate diplomacy. The tactics employed by diverse civil society agents to influence climate policymaking are radicalizing through the adoption of more confrontational language. Activist groups have been seeking opportunities to influence policymakers regarding the rules related to transparency, public participation and accountability in the Kyoto Protocols Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). By scrutinizing efforts of three environmental NGOs (ENGOs) - Climate Action Network, Center for International Environmental Law and Carbon Market Watch - the analysis concentrates on what tactical shifts have occurred in the framing positions and approaches of these activists during the 1997-2015 period. After several years of legal advocacy, expertise and/or critique in an effort to reform input legitimacy of CDM governance, the selected ENGOs have recently drifted away from narratives of green governmentality and ecological modernization and, instead, radicalized their rhetorical tactics by turning to a human rights perspective under the umbrella of climate justice.

  • 3.
    Lövbrand, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. University of Oxford, England.
    Making climate governance global: how UN climate summitry comes to matter in a complex climate regime2017In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 26, no 4, 580-599 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the role the UNFCCC plays in a polycentric climate regime complex. Through an extended questionnaire survey at the UN Climate Conferences in Warsaw (2013), Lima (2014) and Paris (2015), we study what government delegates and non-state observers see as the main purpose of UN climate summitry and their roles therein. Only a minority of these actors attend UN Climate Conferences to actively influence the outcome of the intergovernmental negotiation process. Instead, most come to these meetings to network, build interpersonal relationships, learn from each other and foster a sense of community across scales of difference. The ability of the UNFCCC to bring together different actors across time and space, to perform multiple policy tasks, has become one of its notable strengths and is an important facilitative practice that holds the polycentric regime complex together.

  • 4.
    Parker, Charles
    et al.
    Department of Government, Uppsala University, Sweden; Centre for Natural Disaster Science, Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Karlsson, Christer
    Department of Government, Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fragmented Climate Change Leadership: making sense of the ambiguous outcome of COP-152012In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 21, no 2, 268-286 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article utilizes a leadership perspective to analyze the ambiguous outcome of the 2009 UN climate summit in Copenhagen. By considering follower perspectives, using unique survey data to empirically identify the leading actors in the climate negotiations, and examining the goals, strategies, and interplay of the different leadership forms of all the main leadership candidates, we are able to give a fuller picture of the importance of leadership in international negotiations and what role leadership played at the COP-15 conference. In addition to the insights generated concerning the dynamics that led to the Copenhagen Accord, the article contributes to the leadership scholarship by illustrating the importance of an analytical framework that incorporates the demand side of leadership, the supply side of leadership, the interplay of leadership visions and forms, and the fit between these elements. We conclude by discussing the implications that our findings hold for future UNFCCC climate negotiations.

  • 5.
    Uhrqvist, Ola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Lövbrand, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Rendering global change problematic: the constitutive effects of Earth System research in the IGBP and the IHDP2014In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 23, no 2, 339-356 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Efforts to predict the future habitability of Earth are examined in three interrelated IGBP and IHDP projects: Global Change and Terrestrial Ecosystems (GCTE), Land Use and Land Cover Change (LUCC), and the Global Land Project (GLP). Drawing upon project documentation and research plans from 1986 to 2012, and 10 interviews with researchers involved in project design and implementation, we trace how these projects have represented the problem of global change in the modelling of ecosystem and land-use dynamics. The imagining of global change was recalibrated as project participants brought more aspects of natural and human life into their computations. A top-down gaze informed by atmospheric physics and predictable cause–effect relationships gave way to a more complex Anthropocene imaginary dominated by non-linearity and less predictable thresholds and pathways. Given intrinsic links between ways of representing and knowing a phenomenon and ways of acting upon it so as to transform it, qualitative change in how the Earth System is ‘rendered problematic’ may imply changes for the practices of environmental science and governance.

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