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  • 1.
    Ernst, Kathleen M.
    et al.
    Univ Tennessee, TN 37996 USA; NOAA, MS 39529 USA.
    Swartling, Asa Gerger
    Stockholm Environm Inst, Sweden.
    Andre, Karin
    Stockholm Environm Inst, Sweden.
    Preston, Benjamin L.
    RAND Corp, CA USA.
    Klein, Richard
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Stockholm Environm Inst, Sweden; Global Ctr Adaptat, Netherlands; Global Ctr Adaptat, Netherlands.
    Identifying climate service production constraints to adaptation decision-making in Sweden2019In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 93, p. 83-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change adaptation efforts continue to increase as the impacts of climate change increase, intensify, and become more apparent. However, many adaptation efforts fail to result in adaptation actions. This inaction has been linked to several constraining factors including a lack of actionable information for adaptation decision-making processes. We wonder if climate service producers face constraints as they try to create and deliver actionable information for adaptation decision-making efforts? This paper draws on semi-structured interviews and participant-observations across climate service production environments in Sweden to answer our research question and fords that climate service producers engage in research, coordination, and communication to varying degrees and experience constraints related to the production and dissemination of actionable information and stakeholder engagement, as well as funding, professional, and institutional constraints. Some constraints are experienced differently by climate service producers depending on their specific role, institutional affiliation, agency, and experience. Additionally, some climate service production constraints create or exacerbate additional constraints for adaptation decision-making stakeholders. Therefore, climate service production constraints limit the effectiveness of climate services, and overcoming them would help make progress towards more adaptation implementation in specific contexts. However, for adaptation actions to be widespread, the production and dissemination of climate services must be met with additional support and guidance for adaptation efforts beyond the provision of actionable information.

  • 2.
    Johansson, Nils
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Krook, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The institutional capacity for a resource transition: A critical review of Swedish governmental commissions on landfill mining2017In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 70, p. 46-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recycling of minerals from waste deposits could potentially double the recycling flows while offering an opportunity to address the many problematic landfills. However, this type of activity, i.e., landfill mining, brings many advantages, risks and uncertainties and lacks economic feasibility. Therefore, we investigate the capacity of the Swedish authorities to navigate the environmental, resource, and economic conditions of landfill mining and their attitude to support such radical recycling alternatives towards a resource transition.

    By analyzing three governmental commissions on landfill mining, we show how the authorities seem unable to embrace the complexity of the concept. When landfill mining is framed as a remediation activity the authorities are positive in support, but when it is framed as a mining activity the authorities are negative. Landfill mining is evaluated based on how conventional practices work, with one and only one purpose: to extract resources or remediation. That traditional mining was a starting point in the evaluation becomes particularly obvious when the resource potential shall be evaluated. The resource potential of landfills is assessed based on metals with a high occurrence in the bedrock. If the potential instead had been based on metals with low incidence in the Swedish bedrock, the potential would have been found in the human built environment.

    Secondary resources in landfills seem to lack an institutional affiliation, since the institutional arrangements that are responsible for landfills primarily perceive them as pollution, while the institutions responsible for resources, on the other hand, assume them to be found in the bedrock. Finally, we suggest how the institutional capacity for a resource transition can increase by the introduction of a broader approach when evaluating emerging alternatives and a new institutional order.

  • 3.
    Juhola, Sirkku
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Finland; Aalto University, Finland.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Neset, Tina Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Redefining maladaptation2016In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 135-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As experiences of implementation of climate change adaptation are accumulating, there is a need toincrease the understanding of the potential negative consequences of adaptation actions that mightoccur, and the capacity of research to assess them. Maladaptation used in this context has remainedelusively defined and sparingly used, and therefore difficult to apply. Based on a literature review, wediscuss the conceptual boundaries of maladaptation and how it can be used to analyse negativeoutcomes of adaptation and propose a refined definition. We present a typology of maladaptation thatdistinguishes between three types of maladaptive outcomes – rebounding vulnerability, shiftingvulnerability and eroding sustainable development, and argue that maladaptation can be defined as a resultof an intentional adaptation policy or measure directly increasing vulnerability for the targeted and/orexternal actor(s), and/or eroding preconditions for sustainable development by indirectly increasing society’svulnerability. We note that the recognition of adaptation as an intentional action and the importance ofsetting clear spatial and temporal boundaries, as well as thresholds, are key to analysing negativeoutcomes.

  • 4.
    Klein, Richard
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Stockholm Environment Institute, Sweden.
    Juhola, Sirkku
    University of Helsinki, Finland; Aalto University, Finland .
    A framework for Nordic actor-oriented climate adaptation research2014In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 40, p. 101-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The past ten years have seen a substantial increase in research on climate change adaptation, but a large gap remains between adaptation research and action. Adaptation researchers have either failed to demonstrate the relevance of their findings to practitioners and policymakers, or stakeholders have based their views and decisions on other kinds of information. In addition, in sectors such as agriculture, forestry, nature conservation, urban planning, water management and energy supply, adaptation has been studied separately from mitigation, which contradicts the reality of many practitioners. This paper identifies five bottlenecks to the use of adaptation research in adaptation practice and policy. These bottlenecks have gone unnoticed because the traditional framing of adaptation does not adequately consider the notion of agency, often rendering stakeholder interactions ineffective. Knowledge and use of actor-oriented theory when analysing and discussing adaptation needs and options could serve to find ways to overcome the bottlenecks and narrow the gap between research and action. The paper presents a novel framework for actor-oriented adaptation research that is being conducted within the Nordic Centre of Excellence for Strategic Adaptation Research (NORD-STAR). It frames climate adaptation as addressing both the impacts of climate change and the consequences of climate policy. Two methodological approaches - modelling and visualisation, and policy analysis - are applied to three thematic issues: land-use change, energy transitions, and insurance and finance.

  • 5.
    Livingston, Jasmine E.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Lövbrand, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Alkan Olsson, Johanna
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    From climates multiple to climate singular: Maintaining policy-relevance in the IPCC synthesis report2018In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 90, p. 83-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has provided periodic assessments of the state of knowledge on climate change for 30 years. While these assessments have been central to the making of international climate policy, their relevance has been questioned in the post-Paris era. Can the IPCCs global kinds of knowledge match the demands of an increasingly decentralized and polycentric policy landscape? In this paper we respond to this question by analysing how the IPCC renders a multiple object such as climate change amenable to political intervention. We are particularly interested in the socio-material practices undertaken to translate a complex body of knowledge into a synthesis relevant to climate policy-making. To that end we trace the production of the Synthesis Report (SYR) to the IPCCs 5th Assessment Report (AR5), from scoping, to chapter crafting and final plenary approval, using author interviews, document analysis and observations. We argue that the writing of an IPCC synthesis is a constitutive process that rests upon numerous practices of standardization, aggregation and simplification. While these practices allow the authors to produce a coherent story of global climate change, they are less attuned to demands for geographically-sensitive representations of climate impacts, vulnerabilities and a diversity of response options. As the ways of responding to a changing climate multiply, we argue, so should the understanding and making of policy-relevant knowledge.

  • 6.
    Lovbrand, E.
    et al.
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Kalmar University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Öberg, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Environmental Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Comment on "How science makes environmental controversies worse" by Daniel Sarewitz, Environmental Science and Policy, 7, 385-403 and "When Scientists politicise science: Making sense of the controversy over The Skeptical Environmentalist" by Roger A. Pielke Jr., Environmental Science and Policy, 7, 405-4172005In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 195-197Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 7.
    Lövbrand, Eva
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Pure science or policy involvement? Ambiguous boundary work for Swedish carbon cycle research2007In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 10, p. 39-47Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Metson, Genevieve
    et al.
    Department of Natural Resource Sciences and McGill School of Environment, McGill University, 21,111 Lakeshore Road, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC, Canada.
    Iwaniec, David
    Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5402, USA.
    Baker, Lawrence
    Department of Bioproducts and Biosystems Engineering, University of Minnesota, 1390 Eckles Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55108, USA.
    Bennett, Elena
    Department of Natural Resource Sciences and McGill School of Environment, McGill University, 21,111 Lakeshore Road, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC, Canada.
    Childers, Daniel
    School of Sustainability, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5502, USA.
    Cordell, Dana
    Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology Sydney, P.O. Box 123, Broadway, NSW 2007, Australia.
    Grimm, Nancy
    Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5402, USA.
    Grove, J. Morgan
    US Forest Service, Northern Research Station, Baltimore, MD, USA.
    Nidzgorski, Daniel
    Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota, 1987 Upper Buford Circle, St. Paul, MN 55108, USA.
    White, Stuart
    Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology Sydney, P.O. Box 123, Broadway, NSW 2007, Australia.
    Urban phosphorus sustainability: Systemically incorporating social, ecological, and technological factors into phosphorus flow analysis2015In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 47, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential fertilizer for agricultural production but is also a potent aquatic pollutant. Current P management fails to adequately address both the issue of food security due to P scarcity and P pollution threats to water bodies. As centers of food consumption and waste production, cities transport and store much P and thus provide important opportunities to improve P management. Substance flow analysis (SFA) is often used to understand urban P cycling and to identify inefficiencies that may be improved on. However, SFAs typically do not examine the factors that drive observed P dynamics. Understanding the social, ecological, and technological context of P stocks and flows is necessary to link urban P management to existing urban priorities and to select local management options that minimize tradeoffs and maximize synergies across priorities. Here, we review P SFA studies in 18 cities, focusing on gaps in the knowledge required to implement P management solutions. We develop a framework to systemically explore the full suite of factors that drive P dynamics in urban systems. By using this framework, scientists and managers can build a better understanding of the drivers of P cycling and improve our ability to address unsustainable P use and waste.

  • 9.
    Mobjörk, Malin
    et al.
    Department of Infrastructure, Urban Studies KTH, Sverige.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sustainable funding? How funding agencies frame science for sustainable development2006In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 67-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how research funding agencies have responded to the challenge of operationalising the policy agenda of sustainable development. Drawing on the results of a research project studying Swedish funding agencies' policy declarations, mandates and priorities as well as abstracts from funded projects, we analyse how the research domains of sustainable development are defined as well as what type of research projects they support. The article discusses consequences for the internationally emerging field of science for sustainable development. We conclude that even though economic and social aspects have been increasingly recognised, agencies predominantly emphasise the environmental dimension of sustainable development. The agencies characterise environmental research in terms of basic research and sustainable development research as applied. As a consequence, sustainable development research has become heavily oriented towards implementing the dominant political agenda. Such short-term political utility is interpreted by the funding agencies as applied research. A worrying consequence is that many fundamental questions posed within the area of sustainable development receive little or no attention in the funding agencies' priorities. Such neglected research domains include those that posit alternative framings, identify potential problems and reflect on implications of current sustainable development policy. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 10.
    Sietz, Diana
    et al.
    Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, P.O. Box 60 12 03, 14412 Potsdam, Germany.
    Boschütz, Maria
    Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, P.O. Box 60 12 03, 14412 Potsdam, Germany.
    Klein, Richard J T
    Stockholm Environment Institute, Kräftriket 2B, 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mainstreaming climate adaptation into development assistance: rationale, institutional barriers and opportunities in Mozambique2011In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 493-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Mozambique, weather extremes threaten development progress, while pronounced poverty aggravates the climate vulnerability of the population. With the country being a major recipient of official development assistance, Mozambique’s development strongly depends on donor investments. Against this background, we aim to encourage the mainstreaming of climate adaptation into development assistance. An analysis of donor investments at a sub-national level showed that a significant proportion of development assistance was invested in climate-sensitive sectors in regions highly exposed to extreme weather conditions. Major damage caused by weather extremes motivates a stronger integration of climate policies into development assistance. Although Mozambique has a supportive legislative environment and climate awareness among donors was found to be high, the limited institutional capacity restricted mainstreaming initiatives. Given major barriers at the national level, bilateral and multilateral donors are able to play a key role in fostering mainstreaming in Mozambique.

  • 11.
    Udovyk, Oksaria
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Sodertorn University, Sweden .
    Gilek, Michael
    Sodertorn University, Sweden .
    Coping with uncertainties in science-based advice informing environmental management of the Baltic Sea2013In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 29, p. 12-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Managing uncertainty is a main challenge for sustainable management of complex socioecological systems, such as marine ecosystems. Today, a growing number of scientific publications address decision-making practices under conditions of high uncertainty. However, very few studies have analyzed how science treats uncertainty before it reaches decision-makers, especially for various marine environmental issues. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThis study aims to fill these research gaps by identifying the main theoretical approaches to science-based uncertainty management proposed in the scientific literature. Furthermore, by scrutinizing advisory documents, current approaches and methods to assess and treat uncertainty in science-based advice are analyzed and compared for five significant environmental issues in the Baltic Sea (eutrophication, fisheries, invasive species, chemical pollution, and oil spills). Specifically, the study analyzes the types of uncertainties acknowledged, how strategies and practices present and address uncertainties, and whether new theoretical proposals identified in the scientific literature affect existing practices. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThe studys results reveal that current scientific practices do not adequately address uncertainty in advice formulation. First, no common guideline is in use, resulting in significant differences among studied environmental issues and a common lack of structure, clarity, established terminology, and transparency in the assessment and treatment of uncertainty. Furthermore, new theoretical developments connected with uncertainty appraisal (such as theoretical typologies) and new tools and methods for handling uncertainty (such as precautionary and participatory approaches) are hardly utilized in practice in the management of the Baltic ecosystem. Consequently, although theoretical approaches for coping with uncertainty in complex socio-ecological systems are ample, the challenge for the future is to implement these approaches more effectively in assessment and management frameworks. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThe study discusses possible improvements to current practices in environmental management of large-scale socio-ecological systems such as the Baltic Sea and other regional seas, acknowledging that these measures will not reduce all existing uncertainty but rather contribute to a more comprehensive treatment of uncertainties.

  • 12.
    Wahlin, Karl
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Statistics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Grimvall, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Statistics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Uncertainty in water quality data and its implications for trend detection: lessons from Swedish environmental data2008In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 115-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The demands on monitoring systems have gradually increased, and interpretation of the data is often a matter of controversy. As an example of this, we investigated water quality monitoring and the eutrophication issue in Sweden. Our results demonstrate that powerful statistical tools for trend analysis can reveal flaws in the data and lead to new and revised interpretations of environmental data. In particular, we found strong evidence that long-term trends in measured nutrient concentrations can be more extensively influenced by changes in sampling and laboratory practices than by actual changes in the state of the environment. On a more general level, our findings raise important questions regarding the need for new paradigms for environmental monitoring and assessment. Introduction of a system in which conventional quality assurance is complemented with thorough statistical follow-up of reported values would represent a first step towards recognizing that environmental monitoring and assessment should be transformed from being a system for sampling and laboratory analyses into a system for interpreting information to support policy development.

  • 13.
    Öberg, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Environmental Science.
    Lövbrand, Eva
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science Kalmar University.
    Towards reflexive scientization of environmental policy2005In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 195-197Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 13 of 13
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