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  • 1.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Authority through synergism: The roles of climate change linkages2006In: European Environment, ISSN 0961-0405, E-ISSN 1099-0976, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 278-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the conceptual basis of synergies between the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and other international organizations and agreements. It discusses why synergies are made, what kinds there are and their potential consequences. Considering actors' divergent goals, synergies do not necessarily imply win-win outcomes. The article distinguishes between positive and negative synergetic effects, which should be explicated at different levels, such as the differing goals of various agreements, institutions, parties and social groups. Efforts of international organizations to increase synergy can be regarded as attempts to build authority. Yet, synergy is also used by countries to influence this process. Current synergetic efforts may profoundly affect the relocation of authority in global environmental governance, not only by streamlining mandates, practices and objectives, but also by leading to more powerful international organizations (e.g. WTO) increasingly taking precedence over climate change agreements. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment.

  • 2.
    Strachan, P.A.
    et al.
    The Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen Business School, Garthdee Road, Aberdeen AB10 7QE, United Kingdom.
    Lal, D.
    The Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen Business School, Garthdee Road, Aberdeen AB10 7QE, United Kingdom.
    von Malmborg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management .
    The evolving UK wind energy industry: Critical policy and management aspects of the emerging research agenda2006In: European Environment, ISSN 0961-0405, E-ISSN 1099-0976, Vol. 16, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, renewable energy - and in particular wind power - has come to the fore of both international and UK national environmental policy debates. In addition to helping to meet its Kyoto obligations, the British Government has indicated its desire For a much larger slice of the international wind energy market, and has consequently developed a national strategy to stimulate a more vibrant UK wind energy industry. With this in mind, the British Government's Climate Change Programme (DETR, 2000) and more recent Energy White Paper (DTI, 2003) outline the UK energy strategy for the coming two decades, with wind power featuring as a core component. This article critically considers the prospects for the development of a wind energy industry in the UK and introduces five strategic opportunities and five strategic barriers in this evolving segment of the energy market. The article concludes with recommendations to enhance public acceptance of wind energy and four important areas for future research are outlined. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment.

  • 3.
    von Malmborg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management .
    Conditions for regional public-private partnerships for sustainable development - Swedish perspectives2003In: European Environment, ISSN 0961-0405, E-ISSN 1099-0976, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 133-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a study of public-private collaboration in partnerships for integrated environmental management and business development in two Swedish regions, this paper aims to elucidate the conditions for collaboration on sustainability issues amongst different local and regional actors. From interviews with local and regional public administration officers and with CEOs of several SMEs, it was found that public-private collaboration related to sustainable development does exist and takes place in many different ways. In common, however, local or regional authorities initiate them all, indicating an asymmetric interest in public-private partnerships. In relation to the interest asymmetry, which could also be seen as an expression of asymmetric power-dependence relations between SMEs and public authorities, with SMEs as the stronger part, a limited knowledge among SMEs about their role in larger contexts and different understandings of sustainable development among the regional actors, the major obstacle for public-private collaboration seems to be the limited confidence in local and regional authorities among SMEs. In all, there seems to be a need for further discussion in the regions and local communities on views of and potential ways towards sustainable development, which also includes the articulation of the roles of different actors. © 2003 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment.

  • 4.
    von Malmborg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management.
    Conditions for Regional Public-Private Partnerships for Sustainable Development - Swedish Perspectives2003In: European Environment, ISSN 0961-0405, E-ISSN 1099-0976, Vol. 13, p. 133-149Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    von Malmborg, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management .
    Strachan, P.A.
    The Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen Business School, Department of Business and Management, Garthdee Road, Aberdeen AB10 7QE, United Kingdom.
    Climate policy, ecological modernization and the UK emission trading scheme2005In: European Environment, ISSN 0961-0405, E-ISSN 1099-0976, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 143-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the election of the Labour government in 1997, leading to a flurry of policy documents utilizing ecological modernization language, the UK has seen a steady growth in the use of new environmental policy instruments, with the British government having launched in 2002 the world's first national economy-wide emission trading scheme for greenhouse gases. Among other things, the UK Emissions Trading Scheme aims at stimulating a transition of the UK towards a low-carbon economy. Reporting findings of a recent survey of those 31 organizations participating directly in the scheme, this article critically examines the effectiveness of the scheme as an instrument in climate policy and ecological modernization. The study reveals a number of issues that appear to have been 'glossed over' by recent Government reports, and questions whether the UK ETS and climate policy in practice are vehicles for ecological modernization. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment.

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