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  • 1.
    Erlingsson, Gissur Ó
    et al.
    School of Social Sciences, Växjö University, and the Ratio Institute, Sweden.
    Bergh, Andreas
    Department of Economics, Lund University, and the Ratio Institute, Sweden.
    Sjölin, Mats
    School of Social Sciences, Växjö University, Sweden.
    Public Corruption in Swedish Municipalities - Trouble Looming on theHorizon?2009In: Local Government Studies, ISSN 0300-3930, E-ISSN 1743-9388, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 595-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the 1990s, several public corruption scandals were uncovered in Sweden. This article focuses specifically on local corruption, and our purpose is to examine whether a case can be made that problems of public corruption in Swedish municipalities have increased. By applying instruments from the institutional rational choice framework, we reach the conclusion that there are indeed reasons to suspect that retrenchment initiatives and organisational reforms over the last two decades, often labelled 'new public management', have increased the risk of corruption. Although hard empirical data do not yet exist, the suspicion that public corruption in Swedish municipalities may have become an increasing problem cannot be disregarded. Hence, we conclude by calling for further empirical research in this field.

  • 2.
    Erlingsson, Gissur Ó
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Centre for Municipality Studies – CKS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Loxbo, Karl
    Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö, Sweden.
    Öhrvall, Richard
    Statistiska Centralbyrån, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Anti-Immigrant Parties, Local Presence and Electoral Success2012In: Local Government Studies, ISSN 0300-3930, E-ISSN 1743-9388, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 817-839Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Does the local organisational presence of anti-immigrant parties affect their chances for electoral success? In order to answer this question, the article explores the potential of a supply-oriented explanation to anti-immigrant party success by examining the electoral advancements the Sweden Democrats (SD) made in the 2006 and 2010 elections. Our results indicate that traditional demand-side explanations to anti-immigrant party success can be successfully complemented by an ‘internal supply-side argument’ to make the electoral fates of these parties more intelligible. Whether the SD had a local organisational presence had a substantial effect on its results in the national election and on the probability of gaining representation in local councils. Thus, the party’s fate in the national as well as local elections was largely determined by whether or not it had a local organisational presence in Swedish municipalities.

  • 3.
    Erlingsson, Gissur
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Centre for Municipality Studies.
    Ödalen, Jörgen
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Political Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    How Should Local Government Be Organised? Reflections from a Swedish Perspective2013In: Local Government Studies, ISSN 0300-3930, E-ISSN 1743-9388, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 22-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two main arguments are presented in this article. First, when alternatives for the future design of local government are debated, a government needs to address two basic issues simultaneously: (a) how big (and hence how many) municipalities ought the political system have?, and (b) how strong and well secured ought the principle of local self-government be in the constitution? Second, by using these two questions as guides for our analysis, we argue that there are instrumental as well as substantial reasons to guarantee a strong local self-government in the constitution. However, such a reform needs to be complemented by a politically neutral body of regulations that, under given conditions, secures geographically concentrated minorities a right to secede. Although we use the Swedish case as the empirical base for the discussion, our analysis has a bearing on recent developments in, for example, the other Nordic countries and England, where amalgamations at the local level have been on the agenda throughout the past decade.

  • 4.
    Guo, Ming
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Willner, Sam
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of History, Tourism and Media. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Swedish politicians preferences regarding the privatisation of elderly care2017In: Local Government Studies, ISSN 0300-3930, E-ISSN 1743-9388, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the 1990s, Sweden has embarked on a series of market reforms in public services, aiming for greater efficiency and better service quality. Nevertheless, the political debates do not seem to fade away and local politicians still have to decide on privatisation issues. We argue that attitude studies of local politicians are of importance and present a 2014 survey in this regard, using Swedish elderly care as one example. Our findings show that altitudinal difference between left-and right-wing politicians on private for-profit providers remains distinctive. Moreover, political orientations of individuals, political majority in the municipality, as well as privatisation level already achieved locally are identified as important factors in explaining local politicians willingness to privatise further. This case study serves as a good example to examine the market development of public welfare in advanced welfare states and also contributes to the contentious discussion of political roles in welfare reform.

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  • 5.
    Wallman Lundåsen, Susanne
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Centre for Municipality Studies – CKS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Patterns of civil society organisations' attempts to influence local politicians and local civil servants2019In: Local Government Studies, ISSN 0300-3930, E-ISSN 1743-9388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study aims to analyse these tensions and investigate the importance of the local political context with regard to the ability of local civil society organisations to influence local politicians and local public administrators. This paper contributes new knowledge on the question of what types of relational and contextual factors affect the outcome of attempts to exert influence in local communities. The study investigates whether the connectedness of organisations and the local political context matter.

    This study uses data from a national survey distributed to a random sample of 740 voluntary associations around Sweden. The survey focused on local civil societies’ attempts to influence Swedish decision-makers and public policy at a local level. The present study uses this data to addresses the possibility of a mutual relationship between civil society organisations and local political organisations and test whether contextual factors, such as the longevity of the current political majority, have any impact on the ability of civil society organisations to exert political influence. The results indicate that civil society organisations that have ongoing cooperative relationships with local governments seem to also have a more privileged position in terms of influencing both local civil servants and local politicians. The results also indicate that those local politicians that operate in municipalities that are governed by broad coalitions tend to be less responsive.

  • 6.
    Wihlborg, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Political Science . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Palm, Jenny
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Who is Governing What? Governing Local Technical Systems-an Issue of Accountability2008In: Local Government Studies, ISSN 0300-3930, E-ISSN 1743-9388, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 349-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article discusses accountability in governance of local energy and IT systems. The aim is to focus on accountability of local policy making regarding technical systems by comparing consequences when new forms of governance are developed. Governance steering demands and ensures a clear division of responsibility regarding what a network is responsible for, but not regarding who is accountable for the decision making and implementation. On the other hand, in a steering context characterized by government, it is clear who is responsible and accountable for decisions, but the specific issues for which different actors can be accountable are unclear. We argue that demands for clarifications of accountability emerges from the complex modern governance.

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    FULLTEXT01
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