liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 18 of 18
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ait Ali, Abderrahman
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Stockholm.
    Eliasson, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish Transport Administration (Trafikverket), Solna.
    Warg, Jennifer
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm.
    Are commuter train timetables consistent with passengers' valuations of waiting times and in-vehicle crowding?2022In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 116, p. 188-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social cost-benefit analysis is often used to analyse transport investments, and can also be used for transport operation planning and capacity allocation. If it is to be used for resolving capacity conflicts, however, it is important to know whether transit agencies' timetable requests are consistent with the cost-benefit framework, which is based on passenger preferences. We show how a public transport agency's implicit valuations of waiting time and crowding can be estimated by analysing timetables, apply the method to commuter train timetables in Stockholm, and compare the implicit valuations to the corresponding passenger valuations in the official Swedish cost-benefit analysis guidelines. The results suggest that the agency puts a slightly lower value on waiting time and crowding than the passenger valuations codified in the official guidelines. We discuss possible reasons for this and implications for using cost-benefit analysis for capacity allocation. We also find that optimal frequencies are more sensitive to the waiting time valuation than to that of crowding.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Bastian, Anne
    et al.
    Centre for Transport Studies, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Börjesson, Maria
    Centre for Transport Studies, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Peak car?: Drivers of the recent decline in Swedish car use2015In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 42, p. 94-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has long been well-known that economic variables such as GDP and fuel price as well as socio-demographic characteristics and spatial distribution are key factors explaining car use trends. However, due. to the recently observed plateau of total car travel in many high income countries, it has been argued that other factors, such as changes in preferences, attitudes and life-styles, have become more important drivers of car use. This paper shows that the two variables, GDP per capita and fuel price, explain most of the aggregate trends in car distances driven per adult in Sweden: as much as 80% over the years 2002 to 2012. The estimated elasticities are well in line with previous literature and can reasonably well reproduce the trend in car distances driven per adult back to 1980. We find, however, a substantial variation in elasticities between municipalities depending on public transport supply, population density, share of foreign-born inhabitants and the average income level.

  • 3.
    Börjesson, Maria
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Centre for Transport Studies, Department of Transport Science, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Valuing perceived insecurity associated with use of and access to public transport2012In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 22, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study uses a stated choice experiment and drawings of four different type-environments to assess how various security-promoting factors in the built physical environment influence valuation of walking time when accessing public transport. Valuations that can be applied for evaluating policies to improve perceived security are obtained. Consistent results are achieved, indicating that the method is promising for incorporating aspects in the physical environment in the welfare analysis. The results indicate a systematic variation in value of walk time in different physical environments and it is more dependent of the physical environment for women than for men. This paper thereby contributes to the literature by showing that results by social sciences can be verified using methods and theories traditionally used in transport and welfare analysis and may therefore be incorporated in standard CBA. A contribution of this study is the insight that the perception of insecurity involved in accessing the public transport system is a welfare loss that can be quantified.

  • 4.
    Börjesson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Swedish Natl Rd & Transport Res Inst, Sweden.
    Asplund, Disa
    VTI Swedish Natl Rd & Transport Res Inst, Linkoping, Sweden; Natl Transport Adm, Sweden.
    Hamilton, Carl
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Optimal kilometre tax for electric vehicles2023In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 134, p. 52-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We approximate the spatial and temporal distribution of the Pigouvian kilometre tax for road traffic in the most urbanized part of Sweden, with four million inhabitants and a similar "degree of urbanization" to the Netherlands and the UK, in a future scenario where most vehicles are electric. We apply the national transport model and include all links and four time-of-day periods. We find that roughly half of the vehicle kilometres travelled in Ma center dot lardalen has a marginal external cost (congestion and other external costs included) below 0.04 euro/km which is below the fuel tax in 2019). The mean marginal external cost is higher, at 0.09 euro/km. Our focus is not the exact numbers but the magnitudes and the vast variation across links in a country-like region: 90 percent of the revenue is collected on 10 percent of the road network. Hence, a nation-wide kilometre tax, implying high enforcement cost, is likely not the best option. Instead, the marginal external cost could probably be internalized fairly accurate by a congestion tax in the big cities in combination with for instance an ownership tax. We find that the Pigouvian tax would cover the public costs for our target road system. We relate our findings to the mainstem fiscal tax literature.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Börjesson, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, Sweden.
    Brundell-Freij, Karin
    WSP Analysis & Strategy, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Jonas
    KTH, Sweden.
    Not invented here: Transferability of congestion charges effects2014In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 36, p. 263-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to explore to what extent the effects of congestion charges rely on specific features of a city and its transport system. We use Stockholm, and its current congestion charging scheme, as a case study by making various modifications in the transport system influencing the availability and attractiveness of public transport, bypasses and bottleneck capacities. We use a transport model to forecast the effects of the Stockholm charges given each transport system modification. Our main conclusion is that although the social benefit of a given charging system is considerably and non-linearly dependent on initial congestion levels, traffic effects and adaptations costs are surprisingly stable across transport system modifications. Specifically, the level of public transport provision has only small effects on baseline congestion, and therefore on the total benefit of the charges. Contrary to expectation, the charges' effect on traffic volumes remains virtually unchanged regardless of the changes in public transport supply. All results are compared to and consistent with the one-market standard model. We interpret our results with respect to common arguments against the transferability of experiences from cities having introduced congestion charges.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Börjesson, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, Centrum för transportstudier, CTS.
    Eliasson, Jonas
    KTH, Centrum för transportstudier, CTS.
    Beser Hugosson, Muriel
    KTH, Transport- och lokaliseringsanalys.
    Brundell-Freij, Karin
    Centre for Transport Studies, WSP Analysis and Strategy, Sweden.
    The Stockholm congestion charges-5 years on. Effects, acceptability and lessons learnt2012In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 20, no SI, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Congestion charges were introduced in Stockholm in 2006, first as a trial followed by a referendum, then permanently from 2007. This paper discusses what conclusions can be drawn from the first five years of operation, until mid-2011. We show that the traffic reduction caused by the charges has increased slightly over time, once external factors are controlled for. Alternative fuel vehicles were exempt from the charges through 2008, and we show that this substantially increased the sales of such vehicles. We discuss public and political acceptability, synthesising recent research and Swedish experience. We conclude that objective and subjective effects on the traffic system, as well as general environmental and political attitudes, formed the basis of the strong public support, while institutional reforms and resolution of power issues were necessary to gain political support. Finally, we briefly discuss implications for the transport planning process in general.

  • 7.
    Börjesson, Maria
    et al.
    The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Sweden.
    Rubensson, Isak
    Department for Transport Science, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Satisfaction with crowding and other attributes in public transport2019In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 79, p. 213-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyse customer satisfaction surveys conducted among public transport passengers over 15 years in Stockholm. We analyze satisfaction and importance of many attributes and their temporal trends, focusing on attributes that stand out from the rest in some way, which is primarily crowding. Crowding is the attribute with the lowest satisfaction and the only attribute for which satisfaction declines over time. However, in spite of the low satisfaction, crowding is still less important for the total satisfaction than the cognitive attributes reliability and frequency (the most important attributes). Only when crowding levels reach high levels, like that of the most crowded bus services in central Stockholm, does crowding become as important as the cognitive attributes. Also the attribute reliability stands out – it is the most important attribute. For the attributes reliability and crowding, data allow us to compare satisfaction and importance with performance. We find that that satisfaction and importance are influenced by the performance level for both attributes.

  • 8.
    Eliasson, Jonas
    KTH, Transportplanering, ekonomi och teknik.
    Is congestion pricing fair?: Consumer and citizen perspectives on equity effects2016In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 52, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses and analyses whether congestion charges can be considered to be “fair” in different senses of the word. Two different perspectives are distinguished: the consumer perspective and the citizen perspective. The consumer perspective is the traditional one in equity analyses, and includes changes in travel costs, travel times and so on. Using data from four European cities, I show that high-income groups pay more than low-income groups, but low-income groups pay a larger share of their income. I argue that which of these distributional measures is most appropriate depends on the purpose(s) of the charging system. The citizen perspective is about individuals’ views of social issues such as equity, procedural fairness and environmental issues. I argue that an individual can be viewed as a “winner” from a citizen perspective if a reform (such as congestion pricing) is aligned with her views of what is socially desirable. Using the same data set, I analyse to what extent different income groups “win” or “lose” from a citizen perspective – i.e., to what extent congestion pricing is aligned with the societal preferences of high- and low-income groups. It turns out that these differences are small, but overall, middle-income groups “win” the most in this sense.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Eliasson, Jonas
    KTH, Centrum för transportstudier, CTS.
    Lessons from the Stockholm Congestion Charging Trial2009In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 395-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Stockholm congestion charging trial in 2006 resulted in large effects on traffic volumes and congestion. During the trial, public opinion gradually changed from a large majority opposed to the charges to a small majority in favour of them, and a referendum resulted in the charges being reintroduced in 2007. This paper summarises effects on traffic, travel times, travel patterns etc., and discusses what lessons can be learnt from the trial and the development after the reintroduction of the charges.

  • 10.
    Eliasson, Jonas
    et al.
    Centre for Transport Studies, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Börjesson, Maria
    Centre for Transport Studies, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    On timetable assumptions in railway investment appraisal2014In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 36, p. 118-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The benefits captured in an appraisal of a railway investment are determined by what timetables the analyst assumes in the scenarios with and without the investment. Without an explicit, objective and verifiable principle for which timetables to assume, the appraisal outcome is virtually arbitrary. This means that appraisals of railway investments cannot be compared to each other, and opens the door for strategic behaviour by stakeholders conducting seemingly objective cost-benefit analysis. We explain and illustrate the nature and extent of the problem, discuss possible timetable construction principles, and show that current practice is likely to exaggerate appraisal benefits.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11.
    Eliasson, Jonas
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Centre for Transport Studies, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Lina
    Centre for Transport Studies, Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Sweden.
    The unexpected “yes!”: Explanatory factors behind the positive attitudes to congestion charges in Stockholm2011In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 636-647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several authors have argued that acceptability for road pricing is likely to increase with familiarity. The experiences in Stockholm, where a trial period with congestion charges changed the public opinion from negative to positive, support this hypothesis. Analysing acceptability and attitudes in Stockholm allows us to study a situation where the population is in fact familiar with congestion charges, and explore what the decisive factors for acceptability are in such a situation. By analysing a survey collected after the referendum and the subsequent reintroduction of the charges, we analyse the prerequisites to achieve acceptability given that the public is familiar with congestion charges.As expected, low car dependence and good transit supply are associated with high acceptability. But the two most important factors turn out to be beliefs about the charges' effectiveness, and general environmental attitudes. The importance of beliefs and perceptions of the effects of the charges underscores the importance of both careful system design and careful evaluation and results communication. The strong connection between environmental concerns and positive attitudes to congestion charges underscores the importance of considering and "marketing" the charges' environmental effects. In Stockholm, the politicians' decision to "re-label" the congestion charges to "environmental charges" and emphasising their positive effects on air quality may very well have had a positive impact on acceptability.

  • 12.
    Eliasson, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH, Transportplanering, ekonomi och teknik.
    Proost, Stefaan
    KTH, Transportplanering, ekonomi och teknik.
    Is sustainable transport policy sustainable?2015In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 37, p. 92-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses a specific part of sustainable transport policy, namely policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the transport sector. We explain how assessments of such policies will overestimate their effectiveness if market responses are not taken into account. The substantial difference between market price and extraction cost of oil means that consumption reductions will be watered down by price responses causing increased consumption in other places (spatial leakage) and in the future (intertemporal leakage). The difference between market price and extraction cost also has negative implications for the viability of alternative technologies. Leakage effects become larger when consumption reductions are only undertaken by a subset of countries: we review some theoretical evidence why strong binding international climate agreements are so difficult to reach and to enforce. All this may require rethinking climate policies for the transport sector: What policies remain cost effective for reducing greenhouse gas emissions?

  • 13.
    Kristoffersson, Ida
    et al.
    VTI Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Engelson, Leonid
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Börjesson, Maria
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Efficiency vs equity: Conflicting objectives of congestion charges2017In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 60, p. 99-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the trade-off between equity and efficiency in the design of the Stockholm congestion charging systems. Comparing different designs for Stockholm, the paper shows that the most efficient system is the least equitable. Indeed, we show that moving towards a more efficient system design favours high-income-users most. The reason is the uneven distribution of workplaces and residential areas, combined with richer socio-economic groups living in areas with more workplaces. Hence, the conflict between efficiency and equity of this policy arises from the spatial mismatch of residential areas and locations of employment, and the spatial separation between low-income and high-income groups that characterise most cities. This paper shows that these spatial patterns have a large effect on the distribution effects of the congestion charges and that the system design can have a major impact on equity.

  • 14.
    Olsson, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hjalmarsson, Linnea
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wikström, Martina
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Mårten
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bridging the implementation gap: Combining backcasting and policy analysis to study renewable energy in urban road transport2015In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 37, p. 72-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper combines backcasting and policy analysis to identify the opportunities for and barriers to the increased use of renewable energy and energy-efficient vehicles in an urban road transport system, namely, that of Stockholm, Sweden, in 2030. The combination of methods could bridge the implementation gap between scenario-based research and actual policy implementation and thus increase the chances of research being implemented in practice. In the case study, backcasting identifies a need for diverse fuels and vehicles and for immediate policy action. However, analysis of policy integration demonstrates that such action is unlikely given current policy structures. The fundamental lack of integration between energy and transport policy obstructs measures to increase the use of renewable fuels and more energy-efficient vehicles, which in turn obstructs the reduction of CO2 emissions from transport. The combination of backcasting and policy analysis is demonstrated to improve our understanding of the prerequisites for transitioning to a system based on renewable energy, and could thus be useful in further research.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15.
    Solinen, Emma
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Trafikverket, Sweden.
    Palmqvist, Carl-William
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Development of new railway timetabling rules for increased robustness2023In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 133, p. 198-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to high demand and capacity consumption, railway timetables are often sensitive to disturbances. To maintain punctual operations, it is important that timetables are robust, and methods are needed that make them robust without consuming too much capacity. In this paper, we demonstrate how a policy change in the form of new timetable planning rules can be used to achieve more robust timetables. We present the use of the rules in a real-world case from 2019, when our rules were applied for the Swedish Southern mainline. In this paper, we describe how a new policy for scheduling trains can be applied, and we discuss implications observed when going from research to practice. We also describe how the proposed rules affect train paths and runtimes. The outcome of the rules is measured in a comprehensive evaluation of the traffic performance based on empirical operational data. The results from this study show that practical knowledge is necessary when developing a policy, as well as when developing a timetabling model. Insights, given to us by experienced timetable planners, can be used to enhance optimisation models and make the models more applicable in the real world. The main contribution of this paper is to show that it is possible to increase timetable robustness with a minor policy change based on previously presented research results. Even with relatively small timetable modifications, we can learn from the operational data that the new rules had the intended effect and that overall punctuality can be increased.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16.
    Suau-Sanchez, Pere
    et al.
    Cranfield University, England.
    Voltes-Dorta, Augusto
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Rodriguez-Deniz, Hector
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Statistics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Regulatory airport classification in the US: The role of international markets2015In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 37, p. 157-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a context of debate over the future of the US Federal Aviation Administrations (FAA) funding model, this paper revisits the current system of airport classification used for the allocation of public funding for capacity developments. Previous papers have already addressed the limitations of the FAAs uni-dimensional method, and proposed new approaches that take into account the two dimensions of "hubbing" activity, i.e., traffic generation and connectivity. However, these studies are biased by the lack of detailed demand data on international connections. Using an MIDT dataset comprising a sample of domestic and international markets served by US airports during the first quarter of 2013, this paper aims at providing a full picture on the pitfalls of the existing FAA method, as well as addressing the impact of international connectivity in characterising the airports hubbing profiles. Hierarchical clustering is used to provide alternative criteria for hub classification within the context of US National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems (NPIAS). This new typology of primary US airports can help to optimize AIP funding by allowing for further differentiation in the FAA allocation criteria.

  • 17.
    Tovar, Beatriz
    et al.
    University of Las Palmas Gran Canaria, Spain.
    Hernandez, Ruben
    Mahidol University, Thailand.
    Rodriguez-Deniz, Hector
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Statistics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Container port competitiveness and connectivity: The Canary Islands main ports Case2015In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 38, p. 40-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Canary Islands economy is extremely dependent on sea transport. Since accessibility and connectivity are major determinants of international transport costs, the analysis of their main ports connectivity is crucial for keeping costs under control. Since different port authorities manage the major ports of the Canary Islands, they could be tempted to compete for transshipment cargoes, instead of working together to facilitate supply chain integration that would increase their competitive standing. The aim of the paper is twofold. First, the infrastructure and superstructure endowment of the main Canarian ports and their accessibility, by evaluating site and situation factors, is documented. Secondly, the connectivity of the main Canarian ports is assessed by means of graph theory. This provides important measures that define a ports competitiveness, and its potential to achieve or keep regional or global hub status, and also to follow its evolution. A brief review of papers measuring port connectivity based on graph theory is included to illustrate the current approaches in port network analysis, and to justify our methodological framework. A sub-network of 53 ports directly related with Las Palmas and Tenerife ports has been selected for this purpose. Our findings are mainly related to the connections among the nodes in the sample network, and to the position that the targeted ports hold. Additionally, some policy recommendations, regarding how to improve the connectivity and competitiveness of the Canarian ports, are also enumerated. Previous analysis indicates that, at present, the Las Palmas port is the only regional hub in the Canaries. Both Canarian port authorities should differentiate themselves by specializing in certain valued added services and increasing traffic in these services. This would avoid the danger of a destructive competition between them to attract transit traffic. In summary they should be proactive in maintaining and improving the main Canarian ports connectivity.

  • 18.
    Van Wee, Bert
    et al.
    Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management, The Netherlands.
    Börjesson, Maria
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), School of Architecture and the Built Environment, Centre for Transport Studies, Stockholm, Sweden.
    How to make CBA more suitable for evaluating cycling policies2015In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 44, p. 117-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we argue that there is no reason to a priori reject the use of CBA for the evaluation of cycling policies. A CBA can be very helpful to ex ante evaluate the impacts of candidate cycling policies although the outcomes need to be carefully examined and could be misleading. This is firstly due to current practice and modelling tools which do not address cycling well, key issues being the poor inclusion of cycling in transport models even in countries with high bicycle levels, and the use of aggregate average risk data which do not reflect marginal risk changes in specific cases. In addition it is doubtful whether the value of travel time gains can be captured by the cyclist's willingness to pay. Secondly, some important effects are generally ignored, typically difficulties in quantifying and monetizing the potential impacts on the urban environment, social exclusion and the option value. We point out some research and modelling challenges essential for improving CBA for the evaluation of cycling policies.

1 - 18 of 18
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf