liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Karlsson, David
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish Athletics Association, Sweden.
    Alonso, Juan-Manuel
    Aspetar, Qatar.
    Kowalski, Jan
    Swedish Athletics Association, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Sverker
    Linköping University. Swedish Athletics Association, Sweden.
    Depiesse, Frederic
    French Athletics Federation (FFA), France; University Hospital of Toulouse, France; European Athletics Association (EAA), Switzerland.
    Branco, Pedro
    International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF), Monaco; European Athletics Association (EAA), Switzerland.
    Edouard, Pascal
    French Athletics Federation (FFA), France; University Hospital of Saint-Etienne, France; University of Lyon, France.
    Electronic data capture on athletes pre-participation health and in-competition injury and illness at major sports championships: An extended usability study in Athletics2018In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 136-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study set out to identify factors critical for the usability of electronic data collection in association with championships in individual sports. A qualitative analysis of electronic data collection system usability for collection of data on pre-participation health from athletes and in-competition injury and illness from team physicians was performed during the 2013 European Athletics Indoor Championships. A total of 15 athletes and team physicians participated. Athletes were found to experience few problems interacting with the electronic data collection system, but reported concerns about having to reflect on injury and illness before competitions and the medical terminology used. Team physicians encountered problems when first navigating through the module for clinical reporting, but they were not subjected to motivational problems. We conclude that athletes motivation to self-report health data and the design of the human-computer interface for team physicians are key issues for the usability of electronic data collection systems in association with championships in individual sports.

  • 2.
    Olve, Nils-Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, EISLAB - Economic Information Systems.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, EISLAB - Economic Information Systems.
    Economic analyses for ICT in elderly healthcare: Questions and challenges2005In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 309-321Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Elderly healthcare is a likely arena for extensive change in years to come, and information and communication technology (ICT) will be an important enabler of such change. Before investing in new systems and practices, there will be a call for evaluations. To date, economic evaluations of ICT applications in healthcare have been rare, and a literature review did not turn up any examples of such evaluations of elderly care. The options for elderly care will often have to transcend organization boundaries, as the point of many ICT initiatives now being discussed is to make healthcare institutions, home care, and self-administered care interact in new ways. Analysts performing evaluations of such complex changes will have to be very specific about such classic issues in economic analysis as defining alternatives, the basis for comparison, and combining different indicators into an overall evaluation. Copyright © 2005 SAGE Publications.

  • 3.
    Robinson, Stephen Cory
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    No exchange, same pain, no gain: Risk–reward of wearable healthcare disclosure of health personally identifiable information for enhanced pain treatment2018In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wearable technologies have created fascinating opportunities for patients to treat chronic pain in a discreet, mobile fashion. However, many of these health wearables require patients to disclose sensitive information, including health information (e.g., heart rate, glucose levels) and personal information (location, email, name, etc.). Individuals using wearables for treatment of chronic pain may sacrifice social health elements, including their privacy, in exchange for better physical and mental health. Utilizing communication privacy management, a popular disclosure theory, this article explores the policy and ethical ramifications of patients disclosing sensitive health information in exchange for better health treatment and relief of chronic pain. The article identifies scenarios where a user must disclose information, and what factors motivate or dissuade disclosure, and ultimately the use of a health wearable. Practical implications of this conceptual article include an improved understanding of how and why consumers may disclose personal data to health wearables, and potential impacts for public policy and ethics regarding how wearables and their manufacturers entice disclosure of private health information.

  • 4.
    Stevenson, Jean E
    et al.
    University of Sheffield, UK; Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Israelsson, Johan
    Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Gunilla C
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Petersson, Göran I
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Bath, Peter A
    University of Sheffield, UK.
    Recording signs of deterioration in acute patients: The documentation of vital signs within electronic healthrecords in patients who suffered inhospital cardiac arrest2016In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 21-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vital sign documentation is crucial to detecting patient deterioration. Little is known about the documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. This study aimed to examine documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. We examined the vital signs documented in the electronic health records of patients who had suffered an in-hospital cardiac arrest and on whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation was attempted between 2007 and 2011 (n = 228), in a 372-bed district general hospital. We assessed the completeness of vital sign data compared to VitalPAC™ Early Warning Score and the location of vital signs within the electronic health records. There was a noticeable lack of completeness of vital signs. Vital signs were fragmented through various sections of the electronic health records. The study identified serious shortfalls in the representation of vital signs in the electronic health records, with consequential threats to patient safety.

  • 5.
    Timpka, Toomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ölvander, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hallberg, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDA - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Information system needs in health promotion: Case study of Safe Community program using requirements engineering  methods2008In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 183-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To explore the need for information system support in health promotion programs.

    Methods: The international Safe Community program was used as the setting for a case study. The 14 Safe Communities active in Sweden during 2002 were invited to participate. 13 of them accepted. A questionnaire containing questions about computer usage and a critical incident technique instrument was distributed to all practitioners involved in the programs either at a municipality office or a county council (n=202). The Voice of the Customer Table method was used to transform the critical incident data into needs for information system support. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze data on computer usage.

    Results: Sharing of management information, creating social capital for safety promotion, and injury data recording were found to be key areas that need to be further supported by computer-based information systems in safety promotion practice. 90% (111/123) of the respondents reported having access to a personal computer workstation with standard office software. The interest in using more advanced computer applications was low among the practitioners, and there was considerable need for technical user support.

    Conclusions: Areas where information systems can be used to make health promotion practice more efficient were identified, and patterns of computers usage were described. These results can be used to guide future information systems development projects in health and safety promotion.

  • 6.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDA - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Olve , Nils-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economic Information Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Scandurra , Isabella
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Koch , Sabine
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Organizational effects of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in elderly homecare: A case study2008In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 195-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of information and communication technology (ICT) to support integrated healthcare services in elderly homecare is becoming a self-evident part of home healthcare services. Especially, when it comes to information exchange, knowledge sharing and documentation at the point-of-care (POC), ICT is an enabling technique. The aim of this study was to explore the effects from the use of the OLD@HOME-prototype. 

    The results shown that the OLD@HOME prototype was perceived to contribute in developing horizontal links for communication between individuals who work together, independent of geographical distance or organizational affiliation, and to contribute to increased work efficiency. The prototype was further seen to reduce professional isolation by providing a holistic overview of the care process. User centred design and implementation of the OLD@HOME prototype was considered a key issue to facilitate acceptance of organizational changes. Participation of care professionals not only led to a better understanding of the needs of involved organizations, it also increased end-users’ involvement and commitment, stimulating them to test and improve the prototype until the final version.

  • 7.
    Wass, Sofie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Same, same but different: Perceptions of patients' online access to electronic health records among healthcare professionals2018In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we explore how healthcare professionals in primary care and outpatient clinics perceive the outcomes of giving patients online access to their electronic health records. The study was carried out as a case study and included a workshop, six interviews and a survey that was answered by 146 healthcare professionals. The results indicate that professionals working in primary care perceive that an increase in information-sharing with patients can increase adherence, clarify important information to the patient and allow the patient to quality-control documented information. Professionals at outpatient clinics seem less convinced about the benefits of patient accessible electronic health records and have concerns about how patients manage the information that they are given access to. However, the patient accessible electronic health record has not led to a change in documentation procedures among the majority of the professionals. While the findings can be connected to the context of outpatient clinics and primary care units, other contextual factors might influence the results and more in-depth studies are therefore needed to clarify the concerns.

  • 8.
    Wass, Sofie
    et al.
    Jönköping Univ, Sweden.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Jönköping Univ, Sweden.
    Ros, Axel
    Jönköping Univ, Sweden.
    Exploring patients perceptions of accessing electronic health records: Innovation in healthcare2019In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 203-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The more widespread implementation of electronic health records has led to new ways of providing access to healthcare information, allowing patients to view their medical notes, test results, medicines and so on. In this article, we explore how patients perceive the possibility to access their electronic health record online and whether this influences patient involvement. The study includes interviews with nine patients and a survey answered by 56 patients. Our results show that patients perceive healthcare information to be more accessible and that electronic health record accessibility improves recall, understanding and patient involvement. However, to achieve the goal of involving patients as active decision-makers in their own treatment, electronic health records need to be fully available and test results, referrals and information on drug interactions need to be offered. As patient access to electronic health records spreads, it is important to gain a deeper understanding of how documentation practices can be changed to serve healthcare professionals and patients.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf