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  • 1.
    Aspegren Kendall, Sally
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Börgesson, A
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Karlsson, E
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    The effect of a session of exercise of moderate intensity level on pressure pain thresholds in healthy women2003In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 15-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this investigation was to study in healthy women the effect of a moderately intensive physical exercise session on the pressure pain thresholds of tendon, bone and muscle. Twenty-four healthy women in the 7-14th day of the menstruation cycle took part in a 60-min exercise class. Pressure pain thresholds were measured by electronic algometer at four points before and after the class. Habitual exercise habits and perceived class exercise intensity were recorded. There was no change in pressure pain sensitivity at any site. Increased pressure pain thresholds tended to be linked to older age and later day in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. In conclusion, a single session of moderate exercise in an exercise setting outside the healthcare system or the laboratory did not increase pressure pain thresholds at group level in healthy women.

  • 2.
    Bergström, Ingrid
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Bergström, Karin
    Stockholm shool of economics.
    Grahn Kronhed, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Rehabilitation in West County.
    Karlsson, Susanne
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Brinck, Jonas
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Back extensor training increases muscle strength in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, kyphosis and vertebral fractures2011In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 110-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We determined the efficacy of a back muscle extensor strengthening program on the back muscle extensor strength, kyphosis, height and thoracic expansion in women with at least one vertebral fracture, kyphosis and osteoporosis. Thirty-six patients were included and randomized to a control or a training group. The training focused on back muscle extensor strengthening program for 1 h, twice a week for 4 months and was performed by a physiotherapist. The main outcome measure was the back muscle extensor strength. In an intention-to-treat analysis no significant effects on back muscle strength in the training group vs. controls could be seen (p = 0.74). In a per-protocol analysis (n = 28), the training group increased back muscle strength from 290 ± 87 to 331 ± 89 N while the control group showed no improvement. After adjusting for the strength at baseline, a significant effect of training could be demonstrated (p = 0.029). When comparing the heights between the groups a significant group × time interaction was observed (p = 0.012) where the training women increased their mean height with 0.3 cm (p = 0.101) and controls decreased 0.44 cm (p = 0.045). The training group improved their thoracic expansion compared with baseline (p = 0.03). No effect of training on kyphosis was seen. In conclusion, a 4-months back extensor training program can improve back strength and seems to maintain height and thoracic expansion.

  • 3.
    Broberg, C.
    et al.
    Inst. of Occup. Therapy/Physiother., Sahlgrenska Acad. at Goteborg Univ., P.O. Box 455, SE 405 30 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Aars, M.
    School of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tromsø University College, Tromsø, Norway.
    Beckmann, Kristina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy.
    Emaus, N.
    School of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tromsø University College, Tromsø, Norway.
    Lehto, P.
    Degree Programme in Physiotherapy, Pirkanmaa Polytechnic, Tampere, Finland.
    Lahteenmaki, M.-L.
    Lähteenmäki, M.-L..
    Licentiate, A.
    Degree Programme in Physiotherapy, Pirkanmaa Polytechnic, Tampere, Finland.
    Thys, W.
    Department of Physiotherapy, Arteveldehogeschool, Gent, Belgium.
    Vandenberghe, R.
    Department of Physiotherapy, Arteveldehogeschool, Gent, Belgium.
    A conceptual framework for curriculum design in physiotherapy education - An international perspective2003In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 161-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Globalization is having a significant impact on healthcare and physiotherapy education, among other sectors, can benefit from this trend. The main aim of this work was to develop and describe a conceptual framework for physiotherapy curriculum design and, in doing so, to stimulate international debate on physiotherapy education. The framework was developed through an international collaboration and was tried out in the participating schools in order to refine it further. The current framework consists of three elements to be taken into account in physiotherapy curriculum design: (1) The content aspect or the knowledge base of physiotherapy, (2) the learning aspect or the student's learning process, and (3) the socio-cultural context aspect, which concerns the way in which physiotherapy is experienced and practised. The content aspect includes a description of core concepts of physiotherapy: body, movement and interaction, and acknowledges that physiotherapy should be science-based. The learning aspect and the socio-cultural context aspect form separate parts of the framework. Nonetheless, all aspects are intertwined and reflect theory-practice integration. This framework is offered for critical reflection and as the basis for a debate on the development and evaluation of physiotherapy programmes. Further work is needed in testing the relevance of this framework for curriculum design in different countries and setting.

  • 4.
    Engstrom, Elise
    et al.
    Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ottosson, Elin
    Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University,Sweden.
    Wohlfart, Björn
    Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University and Igelösa Medical Clinic, Lund, Sweden.
    Grundstrom, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wisen, Anita
    Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Comparison of heart rate measured by Polar RS400 and ECG, validity and repeatability2012In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 115-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The purpose of this study was to investigate criterion-related validity and testretest repeatability of the heart rate monitor Polar RS400 versus electrocardiogram (ECG). Methodology: Ten healthy subjects, 19-34 years, performed a cycle ergometer test 5 min on each load (50, 100 and 150 W). Heart rate (HR) was measured with ECG and Polar RS400 and recorded digitally. After at least one hour resting the test was repeated. Major findings: The results showed a significant correlation between HR measured by ECG and by Polar RS400 with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.97 to 1.00. In test 1 the mean difference ±2SD between HR Polar and HR ECG was 0.7±4.3 bpm and in test 2, 0.2±3.2 bpm. In the repeated tests, the mean difference of HR between test 2 and test 1±2SD was 3.2±11.9 bpm with ECG and 2.6±14.3 bpm with Polar RS400 and these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion: This study indicates good criterion-related validity and testretest repeatability of Polar RS400. Differences observed at individual levels should be noticed, but are not considered to be clinically important. Polar RS400 is thus well suited for recording HR during physical activity and exercise training. © 2012 Informa Healthcare.

  • 5.
    Grahn Kronhed, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Angbratt, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Blomberg, Carina
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Waller, John
    Möller, Margareta
    Research and Development Unit, Primary Health Care, BorÅs, Sweden.
    Association between physical activity and forearm bone mineral density in 20-72-year-olds2002In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 87-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical activity may influence bone mineral density (BMD) in different ways. In the present study the amount of physical activity and the associations between forearm BMD, body mass index, physical activity and several other lifestyle factors were explored. A random sample of the population in a Swedish municipality was invited to the study and examined by a questionnaire and by forearm bone mineral measurements using single photon absorptiometry. Forearm BMD was measured in 880 subjects. Forearm BMD was stable from 20 to 50 years of age in women and from 20 to 60 years of age in men. Reported moderate leisure-time physical activity levels in men were significantly associated with higher forearm BMD than low leisure-time physical activity levels ( p = 0.042). The findings that moderate levels of leisure-time physical activity in men were associated with higher forearm BMD, give some support to the hypothesis that increased amount of physical activity in a population might be of benefit in the prevention of osteoporosis. Further longitudinal studies of the effect of physical activity in the prevention of osteoporosis, falls and fractures are warranted.

  • 6.
    Grahn Kronhed, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallberg, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Möller, Margareta
    Centre for Health Care Sciences, Örebro University Hospital.
    Effect of training on health-related quality of life, pain and falls in osteoporotic women2009In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 154-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical inactivity is a risk factor for osteoporosis and fractures. The aim of the study was to see if supervised training would improve health-related quality of life (HRQL), reduce pain and falls in osteoporotic women. Women with established osteoporosis (n=124) were invited to a 1-year, follow-up study. Seventy-three women aged 60-81 years met the inclusion criteria and were randomized to an exercise (E) or control (C) group. A 4-month, supervised group training programme was designed. Participants were studied using HRQL questionnaires, clinical tests and dynamic posturography. Thirty-one women in the E-group and 34 women in the C-group completed the study. The E-group improved in six SF-36 domains and mental component summary (MCsum) index and also in worst pain intensity (p<0.01) after the supervised exercise training. Differences were found between the groups when comparing changes in four SF-36 domains, MCsum and worst pain (p=0.001). Physical activity level decreased in the E-group after the supervised period. Mean time to first fall occurred earlier in the C-group than in the E-group for the first 4 months but the trend did not last for the 1-year follow-up. The study suggests that supervised group training is beneficial for women with established osteoporosis.

  • 7.
    Heiwe, Susanne
    et al.
    Njurmedicin Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education.
    Living with chronic renal failure: Coping with physical activities of daily living2004In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 147-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Several studies have shown that patients with chronic renal failure have a reduced physical exercise capacity compared to the expected norm. In a previous study, we described and analysed the various ways in which patients with chronic renal failure experienced their physical/functional capacity and their daily life situation. It became evident that the patients experienced their physical capacity as limiting in their daily life. Coping has been proposed as an important mediating factor with regard to adaptation to illness. In the present study, our aim was to describe and analyse the qualitatively different coping strategies used by these patients to be able to perform physical activities in their daily life. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data, which were then analysed according to a phenomenographic approach. Results: Three overarching coping strategies were discerned and categorized through the analysis, scheduling, adjusting pace and avoiding. The strategies were problem-focused, and the patients used active-, avoidant- and social-support coping strategies. Conclusions: As there is a relationship between coping and health, knowledge of the various coping strategies is important with regard to the establishment and implementation of appropriate rehabilitation interventions for patients with chronic renal failure.

  • 8.
    Hultman, Kristin
    et al.
    Department of Physiotherapy, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Fältström, Anne
    Department of Physiotherapy, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Ulrika
    Futurum – The Academy of Healthcare, County Council Jönköping, Sweden.
    The effect of early physiotherapy after an acute ankle sprain2010In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 65-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ankle sprain is one of the most common injuries treated in emergency departments (ED). In clinical practice, these injuries are expected to heal by themselves, often without any treatment other than short information about the RICE regime (rest, ice, compression and elevation). Still, remaining symptoms are reported to occur in 30% of the cases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of early physiotherapy intervention after an acute ankle sprain. Sixty-five patients were recruited from the ED at a general hospital in Sweden (mean age 35 years; 30 women), and allocated into an intervention group with early physiotherapy or a control group. Both groups were evaluated 6 weeks and 3 months after their injury. As primary outcome, the disease-specific Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) was used. The patients also rated their physical activity ability and how satisfied they were with their ankle on a visual analogue scale (VAS). The intervention group made significant improvements compared with the control group at both evaluations measured with FAOS and the VAS questions. These findings indicate that early physiotherapy intervention has a positive effect on patient-focused foot and ankle function after an acute ankle sprain. © 2010 Informa UK Ltd.

  • 9.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bergquist Larsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skargren, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Reliability of clinical balance tests and subjective ratings in dizziness and disequilibrium2005In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 96-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to assess (i) the test–retest and inter-rater reliability of, and (ii) the relationships between, commonly used clinical balance tests and subjective ratings in subjects with dizziness and disequilibrium. Fifty subjects (26 men and 24 women, mean age 63 years) with dizziness and disequilibrium following acute unilateral vestibular loss or central neurological dysfunction were tested with static and dynamic clinical balance tests, visual analogue scales (VAS), University of California Los Angeles Dizziness Questionnaire (UCLA-DQ), Dizziness Beliefs Scale (DBS), European Quality of Life questionnaire (EQ-5D), Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Most tests showed good test–retest and inter-rater reliability. Few correlations were seen between objective and subjective tests, but several correlations were found between the different subjective instruments. Sharpened Romberg's test eyes closed, standing on foam eyes closed, standing on one leg eyes open and walking in a figure-of-eight are recommended as reliable and appropriate clinical balance tests in subjects with dizziness and disequilibrium. Subjects with central lesions may have difficulties when rating their symptoms on VAS. Total scores rather than scores for separate items are recommended for UCLA-DQ and DHI.

  • 10.
    Kamwendo, K
    et al.
    Örebro.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Gustavsson, U
    Norrköping.
    Jansson, M
    Norrtälje.
    Adherence to healthy lifestyles - A comparison of nursing and physiotherapy students2000In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 63-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For nurses as well as physiotherapists, there is increasing emphasis on patient education. It is a challenge for health science educational institutions to motivate students to healthy lifestyles and prepare them for their role as health educators. In the present study we compare first-term nursing and physiotherapy students on a number of lifestyle and health indicators, musculoskeletal problems and measures taken to prevent and treat back pain. A questionnaire was distributed to physiotherapy (n = 92) and nursing students (n = 115) at three different universities in Sweden. The results show that physiotherapy students are more physically active, smoke less, and eat fewer sweets and unhealthy snacks compared to nursing students. Both groups reported high back pain prevalences, and both groups favoured relaxation techniques, massage, rest and heat as treatment for back pain. The study questions the credibility of the students as role models. In order to help students adhere to healthy lifestyles and strengthen their efficacy as health educators, educational institutions need to pay attention to students' own lifestyles.

  • 11.
    Lagerqvist, J
    et al.
    Landstinget i Kalmar län.
    Skargren, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Pusher syndrome: Reliability, validity and sensitivity to change of a classification instrument2006In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 154-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stroke patients with "pusher syndrome" actively push away from the non-paretic side, leading to postural imbalance. The Clinical Scale for Contraversive Pushing (SCP) is the only known instrument developed to evaluate the degree of pushing, but its reliability and validity has not been evaluated. A pilot study of the Swedish version showed that the instrument needed modification. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the interrater reliability and validity of the modified SCP. In addition, the purpose was to determine the change in pushing and functional ability during the acute rehabilitation period. Nineteen consecutive patients exhibiting pushing after stroke were tested before and after the rehabilitation. Berg's Balance Scale and S-COVS were used to study concurrent validity and functional ability. Interrater reliability was measured using Kappa and Spearman's rho. The kappa value was 0.51 before, 0.73 after, and rs was 0.82/0.94. Concurrent validity as determined by Spearman's rho was rs= -0.52/-0.49 in comparison with Berg's Balance Scale and rs= -0.43/-0.45 regarding S-COVS. Degree of pushing and S-COVS improved significantly during the rehabilitation period. The study suggests that the modified SCP has a moderate to good interrater reliability and is sensitive to changes, but further studies are needed to evaluate the prognostic value.

  • 12.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hamp, Catarina
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Albinsson, Anna-Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engdahl, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Test position and reliability in measurements of dorsal neck muscle endurance2007In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 181-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of the study were to compare the relative electromyographic (EMG) activity of the extensor muscles at three different locations of the spine (cervical, thoracic and lumbar) during three different dorsal neck muscle endurance test procedures, in order to determine the procedure in which the dorsal neck muscles are maximally activated in asymptomatic individuals. The reliability for one of these test procedures was evaluated using an endurance test expressed in seconds in both healthy volunteers and patients with neck discomfort. Surface EMG activity of the spinal extensor muscles was acquired in three different locations during three different test procedures: the “extended neck lift”, and “straight neck lift” with light and heavy loads in 12 healthy volunteers. The “extended neck lift” was assessed for intra-rater reliability in 30 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with neck disorders and for inter-rater reliability in another 30 healthy volunteers and nine patients with neck disorders. EMG activation of the spinal extensor muscles was generally low. Only during the “extended neck lift” was there a slight tendency that cervical extensors were more activated compared with thoracic extensors. The reliability was good (ICC 0.80–0.94); however, the maximal intra-individual differences and the measurement error were large. The different test procedures used are comparable but there was a slight tendency for “the extended neck lift” to be a more selective measurement for the cervical extensors. The “extended neck lift” is reliable and could be appropriate for evaluating groups of patients.

  • 13.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dynamic posturography in patients with cervical disc disease compared with patients with whiplash-associated disorders and healthy volunteers2004In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 173-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Today there is limited knowledge of postural control and remaining dizziness after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF).

    Objective: The purpose of the present study was to compare the results from dynamic posturography (sensory organization test (SOT) 1–6 and SOT 1–2 in flexed and extended neck position, respectively) in patients with cervical disc disease with healthy controls and with patients with a previous whiplash-associated disorder (WAD). Another purpose was to investigate which objective and/or subjective factors that were related to the outcome on SOT 5 and SOT 6 in patients after ACDF.

    Design: Fifteen patients, half with self-perceived dizziness, who had undergone ACDF with cervical carbon fibre intervertebral fusion cage, were consecutively included in the study. Background data, active range of motion of the neck, neck and hand strength, neck muscle endurance and subjective variables were used in a multiple regression model to find the strongest factor of a good postural performance.

    Results: Not only WAD patients but also a major part of ACDF patients had dizziness and impaired postural control. Male patients without dizziness, with a low pain and disability level had the best results on dynamic posturography. Conclusions: Many patients with cervical disc disease had remaining disability due to postural control and are in need of specific physiotherapy after ACDF.

  • 14.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vavruch, Ludek
    Department of Neuro-Orthopedic Surgery, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Disability after anterior decompression and fusion for cervical disc disease2002In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 111-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few prospective studies on outcome have been conducted with respect to disability after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF), and the need for further rehabilitation after surgery is unknown. Thirty-four patients with cervical disc disease verified by magnetic resonance imaging were included before ACDF with a cervical carbon fibre intervertebral fusion cage. Measurements took place the day before, 6 months and 1 year after surgery, and consisted of both objective and subjective measurements. The results showed a significant improvement from surgery in neck muscle endurance in flexion, neck strength in lateral flexion, some of the pain variables, numbness, neck specific disability, change in general health and symptom satisfaction at the 1-year follow-up. Except for worsening in general health, there were no significant differences between the 6-month and the 1-year follow-up. Despite improvement in several of the variables, about one-third of the patients had deficits in the objective measurements and about two-thirds had deficits in the subjective variables. Only five patients were without neck problems according to average pain, the Neck Disability Index and general health. This suggests that there is still a great need for improvement both of the surgical procedure and the rehabilitation afterwards.

  • 15.
    Peolsson, Michael
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Säljö, Roger
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sätterlund Larsson, U.
    Trollhättan | Uddevalla University, Vänersborg, Sweden.
    Experiencing and Knowing Pain: Patients’ Perspectives2000In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 146-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on patients’ accounts of chronic pain and the manner in which they communicate their experiences. The data have been generated through interviews with chronic pain patients undergoing treatment for their problems. The results show that patients develop a set of discursive markers by means of which they are able to make distinctions between different kinds of pain. These distinctions are made with respect to pain qualities and pain localizations in the body. Further, a majority of the patients report that one pain generally transforms into another. This subjectively perceived patterning we refer to as pain transformations and these, in turn, contain different pain phases. Most patients report pains as dynamic and tients report pains as dynamic and stable and consistent sensation. The results also show that some patients identify certain pain phases as precursors of more severe phases, and that they use this knowledge as a means for taking preventive actions. Since experiencing pain often involves a discursive element gaining linguistic control over one’s pain provides the person with an important resource for dealing with pain

  • 16.
    Qvist, Ninni
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Bergström, Ingrid
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Grahn Kronhed, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Rehabilitation in West County.
    Karlsson, Susanne
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Forss, Anette
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Empowering the fragile body: Experiences of a back muscle group training program in postmenopausal women with vertebral fractures. A qualitative interview study2011In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 63-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was undertaken to explore the experiences of a professionally supervised back muscle exercise group training program (BMTP) in women with osteoporosis-related vertebral fractures and increased thoracic kyphosis. Method: A qualitative interview study was carried out with 11 women, aged 60–93 years (median age 68 years), participating in the BMTP for 4 months. Analysis of the open interviews was supported by qualitative content analysis. Findings: Two categories and four sub-categories were constructed from the analysis: Awareness and experiences of the body through back muscle exercise (sub-categories; Sense and awareness of straightening the back and The usefulness of increased bodily strength and mobility) and Social dimensions of group training (sub-categories: Affinity and support and Sense of trust and safety). The women experienced both bodily and social benefits from participation in the BMTP, including improved mobility, increased strength, physical activity, better sleep, reduced pain and uncertainty as well as positive experiences of training in a group under professional supervision. Conclusion: The study showed that professionally supervised specific back exercise training brought benefits to everyday life, increased well-being and quality of life, and provided an empowering complement to pharmacological therapy in this group of women.

  • 17.
    Ryding, C.
    et al.
    Kvartersakuten, Surbrunnsgatan 66, SE-113 27 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rudebeck, Carl-Edvard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mattson, B.
    Department of Primary Health Care, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Body awareness in movement and language: Concordance and disparity2004In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 158-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose: Body Awareness Scale-Health (BAS-H) is a physiotherapy scoring instrument that assesses the quality and harmony in posture and simple movements. In the present work, we have studied the concordance between body awareness scores and described body experience to further refine the concept of body awareness. Method: Sixteen general practitioners were assessed according to BAS-H and interviewed using a semi-structured method concerning their own body experience in relation to three themes. The interviews for the five participants who were found to have the most well-developed body awareness were compared, with the five that had the least developed body awareness. Results: The participants in the group with well-developed body awareness described a more positive attitude towards the body, and they gave clearer descriptions about their experiences of emotions and conditions such as hunger and tiredness. However, there were important exceptions. Body awareness has two dimensions-an outward/expressive dimension that is expressed in posture and movement, and an inward/introspective dimension. Summary hypotheses: The study was summarized in several hypotheses concerning the relationship between expressive and introspective body awareness. © 2004 Taylor & Francis.

  • 18.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Cognitive and communicative perspectives on physiotherapy: A review.1999In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 1, p. 37-44Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Siebers, A
    et al.
    Rehabiliteringsmedicinska kliniken Länssjukhuset Ryhov.
    Skargren, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Improvement and impact of initial motor skill after intensive rehabilitation - CI-therapy in patients with chronic hemiplegia. A follow-up study2006In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 146-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies suggest that constraint-induced movement therapy (CI-therapy) in the chronic phase after hemiplegia improves motor skill and increases the use of the affected arm. The purpose of the study was to evaluate outcome after modified CI-therapy and to study the influence of degree of motor skill. Twenty-six consecutive patients with chronic hemiplegia, who could actively extend the wrist 20° and the finger joints 10° were included. The patients were tested before and after a 2-week training period and 6 months later. Subgroup analyses were based on BL motor assessment, upper extremity. BL motor assessment, Finger-Nose Test (FNT), Motor Activity Log (MAL) and Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS) were the main measures. Highly significant improvements (p<0.001) were found in all instruments (BL motor assessment, 6.5 points, FNT, 6 s, MAL, 1 step and PSFS, 3.3 steps). The result remained at the 6-month follow-up. Significant improvements were seen in all subgroups. The improvements did not differ between the subgroups. The literature states that no further improvements of motor arm function are to be expected in the chronic phase after stroke. This study showed that CI-therapy improved motor skill and use in daily life, and that the improvements remained after 6 months. The initial level of motor skill did not influence degree of improvement.

  • 20.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Clinical reasoning in occupational health services for individuals with musculoskeletal and mental disorders2012In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 155-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To investigate whether there are associations between the professional assessment of a patient's main clinical problem and the patient's self-reported health among patients with musculoskeletal disorders and/or mental disorders. To investigate differences in self-reported health and work-related measures in patients who were recommended clinical versus work-related interventions. Method: A cross-sectional study, including a convenience sample of 210 patients, visiting occupational health service. Patients answered a questionnaire on demographic variables, dimensions of health, functioning, work ability and working conditions. Patients’ main clinical problem and type of intervention was classified by physiotherapists. Activity limitations were identified using the Patient-Specific Functional Scale. Findings: The main clinical problems were: medical/organic problems (39%), psychosocial problems (46%) and physical work-related problems (15%). The psychosocial group reported more problems in mental functioning and the medical/organic group had worse physical functioning. There were significant differences for the main clinical problem, educational level, work ability, social interaction skills and mobility in patients who were recommended clinical versus work-related interventions. Conclusions: There are associations between the professional biopsychosocial classification and the patient's self-reported health and functioning. Clinical reasoning may be improved by including systematic biopsychosocial assessment of specific health and working conditions, and activity limitations according to Patient-Specific Functional Scale.

  • 21.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjellman, Görel
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skargren, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Back pain in primary care: a prospective cohort study of clinical outcome and healthcare consumption2003In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 98-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to describe the clinical course without active treatment in patients with low back and neck pain visiting primary care. A prospective consecutive study was done with follow-ups weekly for 6 weeks and at 3, 6, 12 and 30 months. Main outcome measures were proportion of patients who were free of pain and back-related disability and proportion of patients found to have received additional healthcare at 3-, 6-, 12- and 30-month follow-ups. The physiotherapist predicted additional treatment. Eighty consecutive patients were included. 39 low back pain and 17 neck pain patients underwent 30 months of follow-up. The results on a group level were consistent from about 4 weeks. In the low back pain group, 41% reported no pain and no disability after 30 months, within 3 months 33% and within 30 months 64% had received additional healthcare. In the neck pain group, 12% reported no pain and no disability after 30 months, within 3 months 59% and within 30 months 71% had received additional healthcare. A higher proportion of the patients, predicted with a high probability to seek additional care also reported additional care. It can be expected that half the back pain patients being cared for in primary care will continue to suffer from problems 30 months later. The slope of recovery is most prominent during the first 4 weeks, and a worse outcome is in the neck pain patients. Further healthcare is not equal to self-reported back pain problems at baseline. The 4-week evaluation can be used to predict groups with future healthcare utilization up until 30 months. Further studies including larger cohorts are needed to confirm the results.

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